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Bob Woodward

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NEWS
May 7, 1991 | By Mike Capuzzo, Inquirer Staff Writer
He sure seems like a nice guy, this fella Bob from the Midwest. He's in town on business, glad to make your acquaintance, talking about his new car, an Acura Legend. "I wanted something unpretentious, and I really wanted two airbags," he says, and you can tell when he talks about safety he's thinking of Elsa, his beloved wife. Something reassuring about Bob - sturdy farmer-type frame, handsome guy, at 48, in a plain WASP sort of way. Firm handshake, strong jaw, honest brown eyes.
LIVING
June 27, 1996 | By Steve Goldstein, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Bob Woodward is not Anonymous. His sources may be anonymous, but Woodward, the reporter who brought down a president and for two decades has kept the attention of subsequent White House residents, puts his name on his work. Anonymous is the person who last rattled the bars of Beltway inmates, delivering a stirring, albeit fictional, account of the Clinton presidential campaign. But Primary Colors triggered more gossip about the unknown author than about its content. Woodward, the bard of Watergate, is the best respected and most feared journalist in the nation.
NEWS
April 14, 2004 | By Dave Boyer
News item: Former New Jersey Gov. Christie Whitman will appear on Jeopardy! during the week of May 10 as part of the game show's "Power Players" series. Sources have provided the following unauthorized transcript of the show. Host Alex Trebek: "Welcome to Jeopardy!, ladies and gentlemen. This week we're in Washington for our 'Power Players' edition. Our contestants today are former EPA administrator Christie Whitman, comedian Al Franken, and Washington Post journalist Bob Woodward.
NEWS
June 30, 1996 | By Ellen O'Brien, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ladies and gentlemen, welcome to today's column, which, following the example of our nation's first lady, Hillary Rodham Clinton, will consist of an interview with a famous dead person. As you might remember, Clinton was pilloried in the press last week after Bob Woodward wrote in his book The Choice that the first lady had called on today's guest for guidance. Our interviewee, who is now a hot guest on the talk-show circuit, is an international celebrity in her own right - Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt.
NEWS
September 30, 1987 | Daily News Wire Services
Bob Woodward and editors of the Washington Post agreed months ago that his hospital interview with the late CIA Director William Casey was too "ambiguous" to merit a Post story, New York Newsday reported yesterday. In the interview, which ends Woodward's book "Veil: The Secret Wars of the CIA, 1981-87," Casey nods when Woodward asks whether he knew about the diversion of funds from the secret Iran arms deal to the Contras in Nicaragua. Robert Kaiser, Post assistant managing editor for national affairs, told Newsday that the way the incident is presented in the book, "it's a profoundly ambiguous scene.
NEWS
September 28, 1987 | Associated Press (The New York Daily News contributed to this report.)
The widow of CIA director William Casey doubts claims that her husband knew of a diversion of money to the Contras, and she has labeled "absolute blasphemy" a report that he had criticized President Reagan as "lazy and distracted. " "He's lying about that," Sophia Casey said yesterday of writer Bob Woodward's account of an interview with the hospitalized Casey in which the CIA director reportedly acknowledged knowing about the diversion of funds from the secret Iran arms sale. Woodward said he stood by his story, which was included in his new book, "VEIL: The Secret Wars of the CIA, 1981-1987.
NEWS
October 9, 1987 | BY DONALD KAUL
I'm not saying it happens all of the time, mind you, but there are occasions when we of the liberal press exhibit a touch of hypocrisy. Like now. We pride ourselves on a tough, cynical "show-me" attitude toward matters. We give no benefit of the doubt, we take no one's word. We showed it in the recent Bork confirmation hearings. Much of Judge Bork's testimony could be described as a retreat from earlier, more reactionary positions. The Robert Bork who emerged from that testimony was not the monster liberals had been using to scare schoolchildren.
NEWS
April 22, 2004
The lie about tax cuts Re: "Taxes: Civic duty or moral outrage," Commentary Page, April 15: The two commentaries printed under this headline miss the critical point on taxes, which the Republican Party has not been willing to engage: Taxes pay for government, which is not free. The Republican Party and its policy of tax cuts would have us believe we can cut taxes and still have everything. That is not possible; it is a deceit. Politicians should be honest with Americans.
NEWS
July 24, 1994 | By Sandy Bauers, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
"Hunk City. " The smooth and streetwise Boston private eye, Spenser, has been called many things in the many books in which he foils the forces of crime. But "Hunk City" beats them all. Robert B. Parker's newest Spenser mystery, Walking Shadow, is right in the groove. It's slick, smart, sexy, chic and chock-a-block with exquisite repartee. As always, Spenser and Hawk maintain their wit, aplomb and general hunk- ism, although they are threatened and shot at. After someone tries to kill them in a drive-by shooting, Hawk and Spenser pick themselves up from the floor and coolly critique the attempt as a shoddy job. The plot?
NEWS
April 19, 2013 | By Ellen Gray
* ALL THE PRESIDENT'S MEN REVISITED. 8 p.m. Sunday, Discovery.   ROBERT Redford wasn't exactly itching to return to Watergate. When the Discovery Channel approached the man who'd played Washington Post reporter Bob Woodward in "All the President's Men" about doing a film to commemorate the scandal's sort-of anniversary - it's been almost 41 years since the break-in and not quite 39 since Richard Nixon's resignation - "my first reaction...
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NEWS
April 19, 2013 | By Ellen Gray
* ALL THE PRESIDENT'S MEN REVISITED. 8 p.m. Sunday, Discovery.   ROBERT Redford wasn't exactly itching to return to Watergate. When the Discovery Channel approached the man who'd played Washington Post reporter Bob Woodward in "All the President's Men" about doing a film to commemorate the scandal's sort-of anniversary - it's been almost 41 years since the break-in and not quite 39 since Richard Nixon's resignation - "my first reaction...
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2010
By Bob Woodward Simon & Schuster. 441 pp. $30 Reviewed by Robert Schmuhl The three most recent American presidents - Bill Clinton, George W. Bush, and Barack Obama - won the White House by campaigning as outsiders, and all defeated Washington insiders (George H.W. Bush, Al Gore, and John McCain) to gain the nation's highest office. A prime lesson of Bob Woodward's secret-strewn, leak-brimming book, Obama's Wars , is that an outsider without governing experience needs time to learn before ever trying to lead.
NEWS
October 3, 2006 | By Tom Teepen
Like a used car, just about every two-term presidency is pretty well beaten up by midpoint in its second go-round, but President Bush's is damaged far beyond bumper scuffs and door dings. One more wheel gone, and it'll have to go up on cinder blocks. The deterioration started back when the post-combat search for WMDs in Iraq turned from an earnest search to a sitcom scramble. The president weathered that hit - and more: the "Mission Accomplished" farce, the worsening insurgency in Iraq, the inept performance of the contractor/friends chosen for Iraq's rebuilding, the president's grudging admission that Iraq and Saddam Hussein hadn't had beans to do with the 9/11 attacks.
NEWS
November 19, 2005
The revelation that acclaimed journalist Bob Woodward sat on information in the CIA leak case for two years is difficult to defend even by "mainstream" journalists who have admired his work for more than three decades. Woodward testified to special prosecutor Patrick Fitzgerald on Monday that a senior Bush administration official told him in mid-June 2003 about Valerie Plame's job at the CIA. She is the wife of former ambassador Joseph Wilson, an outspoken critic of the administration's handling of intelligence leading up to the war in Iraq.
NEWS
April 22, 2004
The lie about tax cuts Re: "Taxes: Civic duty or moral outrage," Commentary Page, April 15: The two commentaries printed under this headline miss the critical point on taxes, which the Republican Party has not been willing to engage: Taxes pay for government, which is not free. The Republican Party and its policy of tax cuts would have us believe we can cut taxes and still have everything. That is not possible; it is a deceit. Politicians should be honest with Americans.
NEWS
April 21, 2004 | By Claude Lewis
Bob Woodward has done it again. His new book, Plan of Attack, is a compelling account of how the administration went to war in Iraq after first creating a war plan behind the scenes. The process was a bitter battle that left Secretary of State Colin Powell on the outside looking in as Vice President Dick Cheney pulled strings to get back to the "unfinished business" of Iraq. It was Cheney who orchestrated an in-house battle that clearly pitted Powell against most of the others. Woodward's book comes on the heels of another controversial book, Against All Enemies, which hit the bookstores a month ago. This one was written by Richard A. Clarke, a former intelligence officer and chief of counterterrorism during several administrations over more than two decades.
NEWS
April 14, 2004 | By Dave Boyer
News item: Former New Jersey Gov. Christie Whitman will appear on Jeopardy! during the week of May 10 as part of the game show's "Power Players" series. Sources have provided the following unauthorized transcript of the show. Host Alex Trebek: "Welcome to Jeopardy!, ladies and gentlemen. This week we're in Washington for our 'Power Players' edition. Our contestants today are former EPA administrator Christie Whitman, comedian Al Franken, and Washington Post journalist Bob Woodward.
NEWS
July 1, 1996 | BY DONALD KAUL Donald Kaul is a syndicated columnist
According to a new book by Bob (Hero of Watergate) Woodward, Hillary Clinton has been having imaginary conversations with Eleanor Roosevelt and Mahatma Gandhi. She had them during a White House brainstorming session with a group of popular self-help authors she'd invited over. That's disappointing. As a graduate of Wellesley College and Yale Law, we have a right to expect better of her. At the very least, she should have talked to Hammurabi. I think the whole episode is a cynical attempt to appeal to the Nancy Reagan vote, people who not only read the National Enquirer but believe it. Mrs. Reagan, of course, was famous for her consultations with astrologers.
NEWS
June 30, 1996 | By Ellen O'Brien, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ladies and gentlemen, welcome to today's column, which, following the example of our nation's first lady, Hillary Rodham Clinton, will consist of an interview with a famous dead person. As you might remember, Clinton was pilloried in the press last week after Bob Woodward wrote in his book The Choice that the first lady had called on today's guest for guidance. Our interviewee, who is now a hot guest on the talk-show circuit, is an international celebrity in her own right - Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt.
LIVING
June 27, 1996 | By Steve Goldstein, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Bob Woodward is not Anonymous. His sources may be anonymous, but Woodward, the reporter who brought down a president and for two decades has kept the attention of subsequent White House residents, puts his name on his work. Anonymous is the person who last rattled the bars of Beltway inmates, delivering a stirring, albeit fictional, account of the Clinton presidential campaign. But Primary Colors triggered more gossip about the unknown author than about its content. Woodward, the bard of Watergate, is the best respected and most feared journalist in the nation.
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