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Bobby Clarke

NEWS
June 10, 1999
Flyers would have been on thin ice without Bobby Fans forget how significant general manager Bobby Clarke has been in transforming Philadelphia into one of North America's most respected hockey bastions. Attending Game One of the opening playoff round, I was thrilled to see Clarke in the upper deck, and to have my son see a living legend. What a shock then, when the Flyers were losing, to have a fan yell, "Hey, Clarke, I want my money back!" The Flyers were a lackluster expansion team until they "took a chance" on Clarke, a diabetic overlooked by all the other National Hockey League teams.
SPORTS
July 17, 1998 | By Jerry Brewer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Flyers coach Roger Neilson met with Eric Lindros yesterday and assured the star center that Neilson does not want Lindros to be traded. The two-hour meeting, which took place in Canada, was scheduled before trade rumors about Lindros surfaced on Wednesday. "I'm not even thinking about trading him," Neilson said in a telephone interview. "It would be crazy to speculate. He'll be here next year. That's what I think. That's what I'm counting on, anyway. " The meeting had been scheduled before broadcast reports out of Toronto had Lindros being sent to the Maple Leafs for forwards Mats Sundin and Mark Recchi.
SPORTS
February 13, 1998 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bob Clarke is back at center. The center of attention. With the main draw of the Olympic hockey tournament set to start today, issues raised here by the Canadian general manager suddenly are at the heart of the competition - at least for the Canadian and American teams. Three days ago, less than 24 hours after arriving in a nation where outspokenness is a vice, Clarke denigrated the U.S. team and vilified Gary Suter. Yesterday, Clarke's remarks surfaced at a U.S. team meeting, prompting someone to ask how Clarke, who once admitted breaking a Soviet star's ankle and captained the notorious Broad Street Bullies, could criticize anyone.
SPORTS
February 6, 1998 | by Sam Donnellon, Daily News Sports Writer
Be on alert, Trent Klatt. This warning is meant for you, Dainius Zubrus. Score. Or else. When the Olympic break is over, a kind of late-season training camp begins anew. "There's a gap between our top guys and our bottom guys that doesn't seem to be filling in too well," Flyers president and general manager Bobby Clarke said yesterday, after announcing the acquisition of yet another center/right wing, Vancouver's Mike Sillinger. "We've got to get more goals in our lineup and we think Mike can do that for us. He's a very competitive player.
SPORTS
September 25, 1994 | By Bob Ford, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The team player is in the office at the top of the stairs once again, sitting behind the desk in a room made heavy by dark wood and expectation. From the windows along a side wall, there is the half-light of the empty hockey rink, its clean ice waiting for the team to practice. "I've moved enough," Bobby Clarke says with a smile. "This is home. " Clarke - president, general manager and last great hope of the Philadelphia Flyers - keeps the outside world beyond the door of his office.
SPORTS
June 24, 1994 | By Gary Miles, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Terry Murray, who was hired yesterday as the Flyers' new coach, wasn't the most well-known player when he was on the team two decades ago. In fact, his career as a Flyers defenseman was rather forgettable. In 115 games over four seasons, Murray had 31 points and 69 penalty minutes. A mere blip in the club's 27-year history. But Murray absorbed the essence of those Flyers teams. He learned that hard work, dedication and defense - as basic and corny as that sounds - really do pay off in the NHL. That's why the 43-year-old native of Shawville, Quebec, was hired yesterday as the team's 10th coach.
NEWS
May 21, 1994 | By Gary Miles, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Flyers rearranged the deck chairs on the Titanic yesterday. Five weeks after the ship sank again. After missing the NHL playoffs for a fifth straight spring, the Flyers decided that Terry Simpson was not the man to lead them again next season. So yesterday, five weeks after the regular season ended, they fired their third coach in three years. In dismissing the tight-lipped, stone-faced, gum-chewing Simpson after only one season, the Flyers took the latest step in their unchecked downturn and created the shortest coaching tenure in the history of this city's once- proudest sports franchise.
SPORTS
April 26, 1992 | By Gary Miles, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Those underachieving, unpredictable Minnesota North Stars are at it again. Just a year after they surprised even themselves by making it to the Stanley Cup finals, the North Stars are giving the favored Detroit Red Wings fits in the Norris Division semifinals. Won't those guys ever learn? According to general manager Bobby Clarke, the Stars, who were up three games to one after Friday's game, are succeeding in the playoffs for the second straight year for the same reasons they won last season: good goaltending and defensive intimidation.
SPORTS
June 9, 1990 | By Ray Didinger, Daily News Sports Writer
For the past seven weeks, Bob Clarke kept his emotions in check. Whatever pain he felt following his dismissal as Flyers general manager, he kept buried inside. Yesterday, following his introduction as the new vice president and general manager of the Minnesota North Stars, Clarke finally opened up. He made it clear that while he was happy in his new National Hockey League home, he was deeply wounded by what happened to him in Philadelphia. "It has been brutal (since the firing)
SPORTS
May 20, 1990 | By Ray Parrillo and Gary Miles, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bobby Clarke, the hockey player, carved out a Hall of Fame career with a competitiveness that his opponents found as irritating as a fever blister. Now, Bob Clarke, the job applicant for an NHL front-office position, has irritated some of the people who run the Detroit Red Wings. According to a source close to Detroit, the Red Wings are angry with Clarke for saying publicly that he was a candidate to become their next general manager. Angry because, as of now, Jim Devellano is still the Detroit GM. In an interview with the Detroit Free Press last week, Jim Lites, executive vice president of the Red Wings, theorized that Clarke and other candidates for the GM job in Minnesota are using the Red Wings to gain leverage in their negotiations with the North Stars by hinting that Detroit is looking for a GM. "We haven't interviewed anybody and we don't plan to interview anybody," Lites told the Free Press.
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