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NEWS
January 15, 2002 | By Will Van Sant INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
It was Margate in August, the end of a long summer at the Shore. Liz Felten of Haddonfield and four girlfriends decided to visit a local tattoo and piercing parlor. It just seemed to be the thing. Felten emerged with a hoop in her right eyebrow. Two weeks later, she got something extra - a nasty eye infection. Body-art industry issues - such as sanitation and training - were addressed by New Jersey health regulators yesterday with first-ever state rules that require parental permission for minors, rigorous sterilization procedures, uniform training programs, and local approval.
NEWS
November 15, 1998 | By Mike Madden, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
All the tattoo parlors and body-piercing shops in town may soon face a new set of regulations, thanks to an ordinance the Borough Council is considering. That isn't likely to upset many people, though, as there are no tattoo parlors or body-piercing shops in Pine Hill - and officials do not expect any to open. The law under consideration is a "just in case" measure. "Who knows?" said borough solicitor John Kearney. "You might as well watch out. " The ordinance is based on a sample text circulated by the Camden County Department of Health and Human Services, which asked municipalities in the county to adopt the measure.
NEWS
April 15, 1999 | By Martin Z. Braun, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
It's not what you do, it's the way that you do it. The Borough Council introduced an ordinance last night setting out uniform health and safety standards for tattoo and body-piercing parlors while at the same time upholding the right of such businesses to operate. Modeled on an ordinance circulated to local governments by the Camden County Board of Health, the law requires all tattoo and piercing establishments interested in opening up shop in Oaklyn to meet certain health and safety conditions.
NEWS
August 14, 1996 | By Erin Einhorn, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
There are two tattoo parlors, two body piercing shops, and one studio for body branding in the trendy Main Street shopping district. These stores also will be the last. In an unceremonious vote Monday night, the Borough Council unanimously approved a zoning designation that limits all future body art stores to the fringes of town. The move is an attempt to control the number of body art shops, without banning them. "We're not saying they can't do it. We're not making any value judgments.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2012 | Dear Abby
DEAR ABBY: On a recent airline flight, a tall man who sat behind me had his left leg out in the aisle during most of the trip. He was wearing shorts, and you could see his large tattoo of a naked woman on his thigh. The drawing was very explicit, and there was no way to avoid seeing it because passengers had to cross over his leg to reach the bathroom. How do you explain this kind of "art" to children? Would the airline have the right to ask him to cover the tattoo if it was objectionable?
NEWS
March 3, 1994 | By Reid Kanaley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Carly Fretz, 18, had stepped cautiously into Studio One Dermagraphics in Norwood last week. She did not know quite what to expect from what, despite its fancy name, is a tattoo parlor. She looked at the proprietor, Paul Palladino, 38, a former art student who was wearing a dark, long-sleeved sweater. None of his many tattoos was in sight. His jeans covered the Elvis on his leg. "I thought you'd be a big, like, Harley-Davidson guy," Fretz said. He smiled. "This is the totally opposite of what you're going to see" elsewhere, Palladino assured her. Aside from the walls covered with "flash" - sheets of sample tattoo designs - Studio One resembled a dentist's office.
NEWS
August 30, 2012 | By Julie Zauzmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Temporary tattoos were once relegated to children's party favors and Cracker Jack boxes. Now, several companies hope that adults - men and women - will apply warm water and a bit of colored stickum to their bodies before they go out for a night on the town. The newest breed of temporary tattoos are produced by hip designers and high-fashion houses for a nostalgic population that appreciates fine body art without the permanence or pain. There's Tattly, which offers tattoos of everything from bicycles to booze bottles drawn by hot artists such as Jessica Hische, Oliver Jeffers, and James Victore.
NEWS
April 14, 1996 | By Erin Einhorn, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Officials here don't want to publicly condemn the local shops that pierce belly buttons, tattoo ankles or brand backsides with burning steel. But they want them safe and they want to keep them from spreading through the quaint downtown area. The Borough Council this week voted to contact the county Health Department about examining - and, if necessary, regulating - piercers, branders and tattoo artists. And, they ordered the Planning Commission to consider a zoning ordinance to ban body art shops from the downtown area, restricting new stores to the shopping centers west of the borough center.
NEWS
July 7, 1996 | By Erin Einhorn, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When the 15-year-old girl was brought to Ron Rotatori's New Hope branding and piercing studio by her mother, her new eyebrow ring was red and puffy and popping through her eyelid, scarily close to her eye. She had Rotatori remove the ring, and then took her daughter to a doctor. "It did not become infected, but it was not done properly. She was very lucky, my daughter," said the woman, who asked that her name not be used. Last summer, another woman's navel ring was wedged in so far that Rotatori was afraid it had punctured an organ.
NEWS
April 30, 2001 | by Marybeth T. Hagan
Pop culture makes patsies out of females who will buy anything to stay stylish. Women and teens are increasingly duped into making permanent fashion statements by accessorizing their bodies with tattoos as the trend traditionally associated with machismo in our society has been repackaged to include the opposite sex. The feminization of tattoos includes a refinement of the term. People who support today's tattooing movement refer to the illustrations mounted on their skin as "body art. " The popularity of tattoos among teen girls is "all about girl power," said Cheryl Ann Wadlington, a widely published journalist who teaches a fashion-writing class at Temple University.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2013 | By Samantha Melamed, For The Inquirer
Beth and Jimmy McMillan will never forget their anniversary. After all, the Oaklyn couple share a permanent reminder of their wedding date, Nov. 11, 2011: a pair of matching tattoos, reading "11 11 11" in a tidy, inch-high serif. Many brides still cover up their tattoos for the big day, layering on heavy concealer or professionally airbrushed makeup. But a growing number not only are selecting gowns that showcase their body art, they're also augmenting their ink with new wedding tattoos that serve as modern, elegant (and, yes, permanent)
NEWS
May 24, 2013
By Susan Jaffe I have no tattoos, not even one that is tiny and pretty and discreet. But I see plenty of them as the city warms up. It is May. Flowers, trees, and shrubs are blossoming everywhere. The soft green adds to the fabulous architecture of the city and enhances many neighborhoods. When the warm weather arrives, the clothes disappear. Guys and gals of a certain age, mostly 30 and under, are covered like the budding trees. No face, neck, arm is unadorned. A walk in the city means seeing all kinds of tattoos, and many aren't tiny or pretty or discreet.
NEWS
August 30, 2012 | By Julie Zauzmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Temporary tattoos were once relegated to children's party favors and Cracker Jack boxes. Now, several companies hope that adults - men and women - will apply warm water and a bit of colored stickum to their bodies before they go out for a night on the town. The newest breed of temporary tattoos are produced by hip designers and high-fashion houses for a nostalgic population that appreciates fine body art without the permanence or pain. There's Tattly, which offers tattoos of everything from bicycles to booze bottles drawn by hot artists such as Jessica Hische, Oliver Jeffers, and James Victore.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2012 | Dear Abby
DEAR ABBY: On a recent airline flight, a tall man who sat behind me had his left leg out in the aisle during most of the trip. He was wearing shorts, and you could see his large tattoo of a naked woman on his thigh. The drawing was very explicit, and there was no way to avoid seeing it because passengers had to cross over his leg to reach the bathroom. How do you explain this kind of "art" to children? Would the airline have the right to ask him to cover the tattoo if it was objectionable?
SPORTS
September 3, 2010 | by Bernard Fernandez
The modern football game, with its pass-rushing specialists and situational running backs, bears only a passing resemblance to one-platoon football. Although he is, in many ways, the most contemporary of athletes, Penn State's Chaz Powell also could be considered a throwback to a time when football was played in leather helmets and without face masks. His versatility is his link between then and now. If this were, say, 1950 (the year Joe Paterno arrived in Happy Valley as a 23-year-old assistant coach)
NEWS
April 28, 2009 | By Shannon T. Curley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Throughout American history, sailors have branded themselves and one another with permanent "markings" commemorating battles or comrades or the names of women waiting back at home. Marking that history, the Independence Seaport Museum has opened "Skin & Bones: Tattoos in the Life of the American Sailor," with the tagline: "If you have a tattoo, thank a sailor. " "The whole idea behind the show is these guys are getting tattooed not because they are pretty, but because they felt strongly" about what they were honoring, said Craig Bruns, the show's curator.
NEWS
October 29, 2008 | By Melissa Dribben INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the recesses of the Sub Octo gallery, where the light was as smudgy and dark as the eyeshadow on the models, four women and one man sat for hours in a stylized pose while dozens of strangers gawked. There was plenty to gawk at, because each individual was heavily tattooed, from neck nape to ankles. Aptly named Stare, this art installation was one of more than 90 events in the weeklong DesignPhiladelphia celebration that ended last Wednesday. A form of art that flirts with the boundary between public and private, tattoos are rarely offered up for everyone and anyone to see, said Hilary Jay, executive director of the Design Center at Philadelphia University.
NEWS
July 3, 2007 | By DANIEL A. CIRUCCI
SUMMER IS HERE, and, naturally, tattoos are in evidence almost everywhere. Do you tattoo? If so, why? Trying to make a statement? Part of an emotional commitment? Remembering someone who passed away? Or did you just decide to get tattooed on a whim or a dare? Whatever the reason, I don't get it. Still, it's obvious to me that others are into the tattoo craze and the movement seems to be growing, especially among young people. A recent Northwestern University survey indicated that 36 percent of Americans 18 to 29 and 24 percent of those 18 to 50 have tattoos.
NEWS
April 20, 2006 | By Phyllis Voren
As a former hippie and career liberal, I think it's my duty to support the younger generation and their various trends and fashions. So, if I'm walking around town and happen to see a young person wearing a brass ring through his nose, rubber plugs in his ears, and The Last Supper tattooed on his upper body, I make a point of smiling warmly, as though I were in complete sympathy with his fashion and political statement. The secret truth is I am not. I simply cannot understand the need to so drastically alter the body to make a statement, when you could just as easily walk into Bloomingdale's, buy a marabou vest, wear it with a kilt and chains, and there you are - and you are not married to it for life.
NEWS
January 15, 2002 | By Will Van Sant INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
It was Margate in August, the end of a long summer at the Shore. Liz Felten of Haddonfield and four girlfriends decided to visit a local tattoo and piercing parlor. It just seemed to be the thing. Felten emerged with a hoop in her right eyebrow. Two weeks later, she got something extra - a nasty eye infection. Body-art industry issues - such as sanitation and training - were addressed by New Jersey health regulators yesterday with first-ever state rules that require parental permission for minors, rigorous sterilization procedures, uniform training programs, and local approval.
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