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Body Heat

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NEWS
June 15, 1988 | By Deborah Licklider and Robin Palley, Daily News Staff Writers
It sounds easy enough: when you get thirsty, drink. But when the temperature is high, this simple equation could end up selling your body short. Athletes, the elderly and children are especially susceptible to heat dehydration, even when they have drunk enough fluids to quench their feeling of thirst. Dehydration occurs, says Dr. Arthur Bartolozzi, sports medicine specialist at Pennsylvania Hospital, when the body's temperature regulator ceases to function properly. "The purpose of sweating is to keep the body at an even temperature, by using the cooling effect of evaporation," notes Bartolozzi.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2004 | By CATHERINE LUCEY luceyc@phillynews.com Daily News wire services contributed to this report
IN AN ATTEMPT to impress the husky-voiced Kathleen Turner at the Cannes Film Festival, Quentin Tarentino told her he preferred her 1980 noir film "Body Heat" to the 1944 Barbara Stanwyck classic "Double Indemnity. " "I think even ["Body Heat" director] Lawrence Kasdan would be surprised to hear you say that," Turner responded, the New York Post's Page Six reported yesterday. Tattle is also surprised. To quote Walter Neff, the evil hero in "Double Indemnity" played by a pre-Disneyfied Fred MacMurray, "Do I laugh now, or wait 'til it gets funny?"
LIVING
July 10, 2000 | By Susan FitzGerald, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Children generate more body heat than adults, sweat less, and acclimate more slowly to changes in temperature, making them more vulnerable to heat-related sickness. And - perhaps because their thirst mechanisms are not as well developed as adults' - children often don't drink enough to replace the fluids lost while exercising, the American Academy of Pediatrics reports. As a result, they can easily become dehydrated on a hot day. "If a kid is saying they're thirsty, it means they are probably dehydrated," said Dr. Eric Small, a specialist in pediatric sports medicine at Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York.
SPORTS
January 18, 1987 | By Brian MacQuarrie, Inquirer Staff Writer
All but the hearty - and the foolhardy - leave boating to the professionals in winter, when capsizing carries the deadly danger of hypothermia. It's a danger that turns seas and rivers into heat-draining menaces that often mean a quick death for the unprepared. Cold water far surpasses wind and freezing air temperatures in its ability to disable and kill. Capsizing in the Delaware River today could shorten your life expectancy to 30 to 90 minutes, according to Chief Warrant Officer Richard Foy, who is based at the Coast Guard station in Gloucester.
NEWS
December 17, 1989 | By Pat Croce, Special to The Inquirer
Do you know any "cold-blooded" individuals? You know the type. They are the people who ask you to blast the heat every time they get into your car. When they visit you at home, they keep their coats on and ask if your furnace is working. They are the folks who seem to always have blue fingertips and lips, as well as teeth that chatter a tune. So why do these people feel like icebergs when others in the same room are relatively comfortable? GENES. A person inherits a lot more from a mother and father than coloring and build.
NEWS
February 28, 1990 | From Inquirer Wire Services
A 12-year-old boy who got lost in the snowy woods was rescued nine hours later along with his Labrador retriever, who helped keep him alive during a bitterly cold night by huddling against him and licking his face. The dog, Shadow, was lying across Greg Holzworth's lap when rescuers reached them early Monday. Searchers found them by following the sound of the dog's barking. "I was scared and I was wicked cold, but I wasn't thinking about panicking. I was thinking about staying warm and getting home," said Greg, a slightly built, sandy-haired boy. "I just laid there and called the dog over and he lay next to me and then he got up and laid on top of me. He kept me warm.
NEWS
November 9, 2011 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, farrs@phillynews.com 215-854-4225
INSPIRED BY eight cases of hypothermia that hit Occupy Philly afterthe early snowfall last month, a camp of Occupiers have built a warming station with insulation, propane heat and fire, and carbon monoxide detectors. Fernando Antonio Salguero, 38, who was manning the station yesterday on Dilworth Plaza, said about 30 members of the Truth, Freedom and Prosperity camp of Occupy Philly built the temporary structure over four days for $800. "We were motivated by the cold and the Continental Army and what they had to go through at Valley Forge," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 1986 | By MADELINE DAVIS, Daily News Finds Columnist
Imagine stepping out of bed in a nightgown that looks like something Diana Ross would wear - but on your feet are a pair of slippers that look like they belong to George Jetson. Well, these booties - pictured at the right - are uhh-gly. But their makers, Fashion Ease of New York, says so what - they're warm. The Toasty Footwarmer Booties are made from a "space age" fabric designed to keep body heat in. The seams are cleverly sewn on the outside so they won't rub. Other features include a non-skid sole and a Velcro closure.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 1988 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
It was a chance remark overheard amid the babble of a Hollywood party, but the recollection of it summoned The Look from Kathleen Turner. The Look makes the lasers in Star Wars seem like dime-store flashlights. The Look induced a state of sexual meltdown in William Hurt in Body Heat, reduced Jack Nicholson's hit man in Prizzi's Honor to aroused befuddlement and put Nicolas Cage in his place in Peggy Sue Got Married. The Look conveys the smoldering sexuality that led many critics to compare her to "a young Lauren Bacall" early in her career.
NEWS
July 21, 2003 | By Susan FitzGerald INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Children adapt less effectively than adults to hot weather, making them more vulnerable to heat-induced sickness. Children produce more body heat than adults, sweat less, and take longer to get used to temperature changes. At the same time, maybe because their thirst mechanisms are not well developed, children often feel no need to drink enough to replace fluids lost during exercise. On a hot day, this puts them at risk for dehydration. "They'll keep playing, especially if it's something they enjoy doing," said Denise Salerno, a pediatrician at Temple University Children's Medical Center.
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NEWS
August 16, 2013 | JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer; takiffj@phillynews.com
ALL THAT summer rain has made the flowers grow and spawned more pretty fireflies than Gizmo Guy has seen in aeons. But it's also made this an intensely good (and we mean bad) summer for mosquitoes, and sparked lots of pitches for products claiming to ward off the critters. To deal with the onslaught (of bugs and devices), I turned to my expert in all things organically outdoors, Mike McGrath, host of the syndicated radio show "You Bet Your Garden. " (It airs 11 a.m.-noon Saturdays on WHYY 91-FM.)
NEWS
May 7, 2012 | Steven Rea
Kevin Kline and Lawrence Kasdan, actor and writer/director, respectively, have known each other for 32 years now. They met when Kasdan, making a name for himself in Los Angeles as a go-to screenwriter (Steven Spielberg went to him for Raiders of the Lost Ark , George Lucas for Return of the Jedi ), was looking for the lead for his directorial debut, the neo-noir Body Heat . "I was seeing people in L.A., but there were all these incredible stage actors in New York," Kasdan remembers.
NEWS
November 9, 2011 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, farrs@phillynews.com 215-854-4225
INSPIRED BY eight cases of hypothermia that hit Occupy Philly afterthe early snowfall last month, a camp of Occupiers have built a warming station with insulation, propane heat and fire, and carbon monoxide detectors. Fernando Antonio Salguero, 38, who was manning the station yesterday on Dilworth Plaza, said about 30 members of the Truth, Freedom and Prosperity camp of Occupy Philly built the temporary structure over four days for $800. "We were motivated by the cold and the Continental Army and what they had to go through at Valley Forge," he said.
NEWS
January 14, 2007 | By Dawn Fallik INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Robert Sachs was a young boy in North Carolina, his mother bundled him up and tied garbage bags around his feet on cold days. The plastic bags made him feel like an idiot, and didn't do much to keep out the cold or the wet. Neither did all the bundling. "Mom would just pile all this stuff on us," he said. "You just sweat through everything. " These days, Sachs, 26, an all-season hiker from Manayunk, has exchanged his plastic bags for polypropylene, a plastic fiber that wicks water away from the body.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2004 | By CATHERINE LUCEY luceyc@phillynews.com Daily News wire services contributed to this report
IN AN ATTEMPT to impress the husky-voiced Kathleen Turner at the Cannes Film Festival, Quentin Tarentino told her he preferred her 1980 noir film "Body Heat" to the 1944 Barbara Stanwyck classic "Double Indemnity. " "I think even ["Body Heat" director] Lawrence Kasdan would be surprised to hear you say that," Turner responded, the New York Post's Page Six reported yesterday. Tattle is also surprised. To quote Walter Neff, the evil hero in "Double Indemnity" played by a pre-Disneyfied Fred MacMurray, "Do I laugh now, or wait 'til it gets funny?"
NEWS
July 21, 2003 | By Susan FitzGerald INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Children adapt less effectively than adults to hot weather, making them more vulnerable to heat-induced sickness. Children produce more body heat than adults, sweat less, and take longer to get used to temperature changes. At the same time, maybe because their thirst mechanisms are not well developed, children often feel no need to drink enough to replace fluids lost during exercise. On a hot day, this puts them at risk for dehydration. "They'll keep playing, especially if it's something they enjoy doing," said Denise Salerno, a pediatrician at Temple University Children's Medical Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 2000 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Next to the white heat generated by a 14-year-old girl, the temperature of Rachmaninoff's passion feels kind of tepid. A comic look at two teen groupies who idolize an eccentric concert pianist, The World of Henry Orient (1964) stars Peter Sellers as the musician/playboy desired by all the females in New York. The teenagers are played by Tippy Walker, tossing the best haircut in Hollywood history, and Merrie Spaeth, a tightly curled blonde who catches on quicker than her pal that a teen crush is sometimes displaced feelings for one's own father.
LIVING
July 10, 2000 | By Susan FitzGerald, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Children generate more body heat than adults, sweat less, and acclimate more slowly to changes in temperature, making them more vulnerable to heat-related sickness. And - perhaps because their thirst mechanisms are not as well developed as adults' - children often don't drink enough to replace the fluids lost while exercising, the American Academy of Pediatrics reports. As a result, they can easily become dehydrated on a hot day. "If a kid is saying they're thirsty, it means they are probably dehydrated," said Dr. Eric Small, a specialist in pediatric sports medicine at Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York.
NEWS
July 24, 1999 | By Walter F. Naedele, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Holy heat wave, how will we cope? Maybe we can take a few hints from the creatures of the wild. Sure, we should have adapted now that we're into the second day of the summer's third string of above-90-degree days. But there are a few odd ways - not all quite worthy of imitation - that our friends of field and forest use to try to keep cool: Black vultures urinate on their legs. Turtles and frogs go into a form of hibernation, lowering body heat. Worker bees gather together and do just the opposite, beating their wings furiously.
NEWS
July 18, 1997 | By Jere Downs, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The air shimmered with 90-degree heat. Strolling on Forbidden Drive in Fairmount Park, Patrick Monsego, 21, and his fiancee crept to a secluded spot. "We were in the woods, the sun was coming through the trees . . .," the video clerk recalled, blushing at the memory of last week's interlude. "In 10 minutes, my back was so wet it was like someone poured a bucket of water on it. " Mal Gran, 56, had just walked into the Chestnut Hill video store. Listening to Monsego's story of summer abandon, his lips curled into a grin.
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