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Body Parts

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NEWS
December 19, 2008 | By Dwight Ott INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Philadelphia funeral director, depicted in court as a Jekyll and Hyde, was sentenced yesterday to 3 1/2 to 10 years in prison after admitting his role in a multimillion-dollar scheme in which body parts were stolen from the dead for use in surgery. "It's like a Frankenstein movie," a relative of a victim told Common Pleas Court Judge Glenn Bronson. James A. McCafferty Jr., 38, of Frankford, had pleaded guilty to his role in a multistate ring that stole body parts, and had agreed to cooperate in the trial of two other morticians.
NEWS
October 29, 2007 | By Troy Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Angela Morris's father died of cancer in 2005, she picked a funeral home to handle his cremation simply because it was close to his Philadelphia hospice. She selected the Garzone Funeral Home, one of two funeral homes accused earlier this month in a scheme to steal body parts from cadavers without family consent. Those body parts - bones, skin, tendons and other tissue - were sold to medical body-parts distributors in a lucrative transplant industry, the Philadelphia District Attorney's Office said.
NEWS
October 17, 1986 | By Robert J. Terry and Dale Mezzacappa, Inquirer Staff Writers
Dr. Martin Spector, charged in an alleged scheme to remove body parts from cadavers and sell them for profit to research facilities out of state, was released on his own recognizance yesterday after spending the night in jail. Spector, 70, was arrested Wednesday along with four morgue employees of local hospitals and medical schools. As police described the arrangement, the workers would sever heads, ears and arms from bodies that had been donated for research and sell the parts to Spector.
NEWS
August 30, 2008 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Selling illegally obtained body parts for use in implant surgery was a profitable fallback career for Michael Mastromarino, a North Jersey oral surgeon who had lost his license for drug offenses. But not profitable enough. Removing bones, skin and tendons from corpses was time-consuming and expensive: PVC pipe was needed to fill out the deboned limbs if there was a viewing. That all changed in early 2004, a city prosecutor said yesterday, when Mastromarino met three Philadelphia morticians who had just what he needed - a crematorium.
NEWS
April 18, 1987 | By Thomas J. Gibbons Jr. and Edward Power, Inquirer Staff Writers
Human remains recovered from a kitchen freezer in the Franklinville home of torture and murder suspect Gary Michael Heidnik have been positively identified as those of Sandra Lindsay, according to an assistant Philadelphia medical examiner. Dr. Paul Hoyer, a forensic pathologist with the Medical Examiner's Office, said yesterday that the body parts were identified as Lindsay's on Thursday. Lindsay, 24, had lived in the 400 block of North Holly Street in West Philadelphia. Hoyer said the identification was made after he traveled to the Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology in St. Louis and consulted with another forensic radiologist.
NEWS
March 23, 1998 | Daily News wire services
Mutilated body parts of a missing 12-year-old have been discovered entombed in chunks of fresh concrete that oozed blood. Police arrested seven people yesterday for investigation of murder in the death of sixth-grader Juan Delgado, last seen Tuesday and reported missing Thursday. The seven people lived near the suburban lawn where one of two concrete blocks was apparently dumped overnight and found Saturday. Capt. John Rees listed off the evidence recovered from a tool shed that ties them to the murder.
NEWS
October 15, 1986 | By TONI LOCY and JOE O'DOWD, Daily News Staff Writers
Arrest warrants were issued today for a Philadelphia ear, nose and throat specialist and four employees of three area hospitals who allegedly were involved in shipping body parts for profit. The warrants were issued for Dr. Martin Spector, 70, whose office and residence is at 22nd and Locust streets, and four morgue workers. Spector surrendered to police at 1:15 p.m. The four other suspects were not in custody early this afternoon. They are Lynwood Summers, 56, of Franklinville, N.J., and Wilbert Richardson, 58, of Chester, who both worked at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania; Reuben Whitehead, 53, of Philadelphia, an employee of the Veterans Administration Hospital in West Philadelphia and Lenard Stephens, 60, of Philadelphia, an employee of Thomas Jefferson University Hospital.
NEWS
August 5, 1991 | Daily News Wire Services
The movie "Body Parts" opened without fanfare in 1,300 theaters nationwide Friday, accompanied by revised advertisements intended to remove any association between the film and the grisly discovery of nearly a dozen dismembered corpses in a Milwaukee apartment July 22. Even in Milwaukee, where Jeffrey L. Dahmer, 31, now stands accused of having murdered as many as 11 young men, the movie was showing in four theaters. The television advertisement campaign that was halted in southern Wisconsin after the bodies were found, has now resumed.
NEWS
January 16, 1987 | By Henry Goldman, Inquirer Staff Writer
A receptionist for Dr. Martin Spector testified yesterday that she routinely accepted human heads and other body parts from workers at hospital morgues and shipped them in boxes through United Parcel Service to a research facility in Colorado. Karen Morton said the doctor paid $150 per head, $65 per arm and $20 per pair of ear bones to the men who delivered the body parts to his office. She testified that in July, she boxed a shipment of heads and sent them to the Colorado Ontological Research Center in Denver.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 27, 2015 | BY DR. MARTY BECKER, Universal Uclick
INSIDE EVERY CAT is a lion. Or a tiger. Or a lynx. Or, really, all of these great hunters. And in your cat's mind, he's a wild predator, too. In fact, all cats are. They love to lurk, prowl, chase and pounce. An indoor cat doesn't have the opportunity to go after real prey (unless you have mice in your home), but he still has strong hunting instincts. This genetic coding doesn't disappear just because he lives a royal lifestyle in your home and has his meals delivered on the feline equivalent of a silver platter.
NEWS
November 26, 2015
ISSUE | ABORTION A video review I am amazed that the commentary by U.S. Rep. Chris Smith (R., N.J.) about Planned Parenthood's supposed videos of the dismemberment of a fetus and illegal selling of its body parts was printed ("It's time to demand answers of Planned Parenthood," Sunday). Those videos were highly edited by the Center for Medical Progress, an antiabortion group. In July, a New York Times editorial exposed their lies after a years-long attack on Planned Parenthood.
NEWS
June 1, 2015 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eyes. Lips. Nose. Chin. Cheeks. Neck. Breasts. Abdomen. Hips. The inventory of imperfect body parts that bother women and lead them to undergo cosmetic plastic surgery was already extensive. It has now reached bottom. According to the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, during the last few years, demand for cosmetic labiaplasty, a trimming of the female genitalia, has increased dramatically. In 2005, this is how many labiaplasties Adrian Lo, a prominent Philadelphia plastic surgeon, performed: Zero.
NEWS
April 13, 2015 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
BEFORE HIS sentencing hearing yesterday, Keith Tolbert - the pimp who chopped up a man's body with an ax two years ago, then dumped the victim's torso in the Schuylkill - told authorities what he allegedly did with the man's unrecovered body parts. In a private 15-minute talk with a police homicide detective, a Crime Scene Unit investigator, the prosecutor and his lawyer, Tolbert answered all their questions, his attorney Mary Maran said afterward. She would not disclose specifics of what was said, but said police were directed to search in the city's "rivers.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2014 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
Doug Wright's over-the-top play is being given an over-the-top production by Luna Theater Company. Quills is about the over-the-top Marquis de Sade, who lent his name to sadism, sexual pleasure derived from inflicting pain, and who wrote novels of shocking, violent pornography. Excess is the name of the game here: sexually, literarily, and theatrically. As Wright explains in his notes on style, "Characters are not good or bad; they are either kissed by God or yoked in Satan's merciless employ.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2014 | By Erin Edinger-Turoff, Inquirer Staff Writer
To prepare their newest project, Body Worlds: Animal Inside Out , German anatomists Gunther von Hagens and Angelina Whalley needed a forklift. Von Hagens is famous for the 1977 invention of plastination, a preservation technique that allows the anatomy of once-living beings to be displayed indefinitely. He and Whalley needed heavy machinery to maneuver the body of a full-grown giraffe into various substances that would dehydrate and then plasticize its tissues and organs. The process took more than two years.
SPORTS
May 23, 2014 | By Rich Hofmann, Daily News Columnist
A LONG, LONG time ago, an Eagles player - one of those freakishly cut offensive linemen from back then, with no body fat at all - lost his mind on the practice field, just attacking everybody he could reach. It was quite a scene, a classic 'roid-rage incident. The next day, the club told reporters that they weren't sure, but they thought it might have been some kind of allergic reaction to a bee sting, and we all wrote it down and put it in the paper the next day. We were such idiots.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2014
WE HATE the thought of you starting your day by conjuring a cringeworthy image, but, hey, we here at Tattle Central are sworn to deliver all the news that celebrity bottom-feeders churn up. And this one's a doozy: In the latest issue of GQ magazine, hot comic (and we mean that in multiple ways) Amy Schumer swears that 88-year-old showbiz immortal Jerry Lewis tried to use physical force (!) to get her on her back. It happened, said Schumer, who works in sex jokes the way Monet worked in pastels, last year at an event at the Friars Club, the venerable Manhattan showbiz hangout where mostly aging comedians overpay for mediocre food.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2014 | BY CHUCK DARROW, Daily News Staff Writer darrowc@phillynews.com, 215-313-3134
BOBBY Rydell readily admits that the Daily News already should have published his obituary. "You're not being overdramatic whatsoever," he responded, when asked if it would be too much to say that, logically speaking, he should be dead. "I [needed] a liver transplant, then found out I was going into renal failure and needed a kidney transplant - which, fortunately, boosted me up on the transplant [waiting] list. " The dire recollection of his July 2012 double-transplant surgery, proffered in the Eagles- and Phillies-decorated den of Rydell's Lower Merion home, was not at all hyperbolic.
NEWS
July 26, 2013 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
MAYBE IT'S BECAUSE there have been so many rallies lately - for Trayvon Martin, for victims of urban violence. But there was a familiar attitude among those who stood vigil for a transgender woman allegedly butchered by a john in Strawberry Mansion: The media ignore us, and when they don't, they disrespect and misrepresent us. Society views us as disposable, expendable. I didn't totally disagree. But, as I stood in the crowd listening to friends and advocates mourn Diamond Woods, I wondered: If we can't even manage to care about the deaths of people we should be able to relate to - children - what chance do people often viewed as spectacles and freaks have at getting our attention, let alone our sympathy?
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