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BUSINESS
December 10, 2011 | By Sam Hananel, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The National Labor Relations Board on Friday officially dropped its high-profile case challenging Boeing's decision to open a nonunion aircraft manufacturing plant in South Carolina. The board acted after the Machinists union approved a four-year contract extension with Boeing earlier this week and agreed to withdraw its charge that the company violated federal labor laws. Lafe Solomon, the board's acting general counsel, said he had always preferred a settlement.
BUSINESS
October 12, 1986 | By Tom Belden, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a city where building big airplanes is the backbone of the economy, the cheap fares that airlines offer these days are not some isolated phenomenon, of interest only to travelers. For the Boeing Co., its 70,000-plus employees in the Seattle area and thousands of others who benefit from its presence here, what the airlines do - and how much money they make doing it - strikes close to the heart. The fate of the airlines and of Boeing, the world's biggest aircraft maker, are intertwined.
BUSINESS
February 19, 1993 | Daily News Wire Services
Boeing Co. said yesterday it will cut 28,000 jobs - nearly 20 percent of its work force - by the middle of next year, as the world's largest aircraft company retrenches in the face of slumping orders. The cutbacks will reduce employment at the company's Helicopters Division in Ridley Park, Delaware County, by 400 workers by the end of this year. Workers had been girding for the bad news ever since the company said late last month that it was slashing aircraft production by one-third over 18 months.
NEWS
August 19, 2010 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
MASCOUTAH, Ill. - Chicago-based Boeing Co. says it plans to open a manufacturing facility at a long-struggling airport in southwestern Illinois. In a news release today, Boeing says that it will lease space at MidAmerica Airport for assembly work and that the facility will initially employ 75 people. Officials at a ceremony at the airport suggested there would be more. This will be Boeing's first manufacturing facility in Illinois. The company has 16,000 employees in nearby St. Louis.
NEWS
March 22, 2001 | Daily News Wire Services
In Chicago, Dallas and Denver - the three cities the Boeing Co. says it is considering for a new corporate home - efforts to land the aerospace giant have begun. Boeing stunned its hometown yesterday with the announcement it is moving its headquarters out of Seattle, where the aircraft manufacturing giant was founded 85 years ago. Chairman and Chief Executive Phil Condit said moving to either Chicago, Denver or Dallas-Fort Worth would save money and give the world's No. 1 maker of passenger jets a headquarters central to its operations, now spread over 26 states.
BUSINESS
May 28, 1995 | By Tom Belden, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Boeing's new 777 jets begin spanning the globe this summer, each of the twin-engine behemoths will contain parts made of fiberglass and glue with a distinctive number on them. The number is a code for "Made in Philadelphia. " More precisely, the various parts of the front edges of each 777 wing should be stamped: "Made in Ridley Township, Delaware County," the home of a large Boeing division that has been best known since the 1950s for making military helicopters. But with the defense budget shrinking or holding steady these days, a growing part of the Ridley workforce is kept busy with work for its commercial aircraft group.
BUSINESS
May 20, 1988 | By MARC MELTZER, Daily News Staff Writer
Hawkeye Pierce and Trapper John, the stars of the Korean War on nightly TV, never would have gotten a chance to yuk it up if Boeing Helicopter's V-22 Osprey were more than a science fiction writer's dream back then. The military says that the Osprey, history's first combination helicopter- airplane, could make obsolete the MASH, or mobile army surgical hospital, units, such as the one that set the stage for the "M A S H" TV show. One future role for the Osprey, part of which is being built at Boeing's massive manufacturing site in Ridley Township, Delaware County, could be to bring doctors and medical staff directly from hospitals to battle zones, eliminating the need for MASH units to operate as an intermediary.
NEWS
January 5, 1992 | By John P. Martin, Special to The Inquirer
The widow of a Doylestown man killed in a United Airlines crash in Colorado has sued the airline and plane manufacturer, contending that the plane had defective rudder controls and that the companies knew of the possible danger. Christine Bodnar, whose husband, Andrew, was killed in the March 3 crash, filed the suit Tuesday in Bucks County Court. She is seeking more than $20,000 in damages from the airline and the Boeing Co., which made the 737 her husband boarded that morning in Denver.
BUSINESS
January 19, 1990 | The Inquirer Staff
Boeing Co. said yesterday that because of a sharp downturn in military business, it would lay off about 1,700 hourly employees this week and cut up to 5,000 jobs, or 3 percent of its workforce, by year-end. The Seattle-based company, which had 164,600 employees worldwide at the end of 1989, cited the likelihood of lower defense spending in coming years. Boeing (NYSE) is one of the 10 biggest defense contractors in the nation and the world's largest maker of commercial planes. Boeing said another reason for the reductions was that it did not yet have enough orders to start making a new, larger version of its 767 twin jet dubbed the 777. Average mortgage rates were mixed this week in the Philadelphia area, Mortgage Reporting Services Inc., of Jenkintown, said.
BUSINESS
January 27, 1988 | The Inquirer Staff
Boeing Co. yesterday rolled out two new commercial jets, a stretched version of its 737 aircraft and a 747 jumbo jet able to fly nonstop from New York to Seoul or from London to Tokyo. Industry analysts said the two new aircraft should help the Seattle-based company retain its position as the world's leading commercial aircraft-maker. Boeing has said it has 205 advance orders for the aircraft and options for an additional 89, which should help its bottom line in the next few years.
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NEWS
February 4, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
Gregory A. McAdams, 77, of Haddon Heights, who earned a Distinguished Flying Cross during a 21-year career as a Marine Corps pilot, died of heart failure Thursday, Jan. 28, at Cooper University Hospital in Camden. Mr. McAdams, who retired in 1982 as a lieutenant colonel, earned among other honors a presidential unit citation and a Republic of Vietnam meritorious unit citation. He then joined the Boeing Co. in Ridley Township, where in 2000 he retired as a senior manager for business development of the V-22 Osprey, a military aircraft that can take off like a helicopter.
NEWS
June 16, 2015 | MICHAEL HINKELMAN
YOU WON'T FIND a more fervent supporter of reauthorization of the Export-Import Bank - its charter is set to expire June 30 - than Joseph Miceli, CEO of Airline Hydraulics Corp. of Bensalem. Ex-Im is the feds' trade bank that offers loan guarantees to foreign companies that buy U.S.-manufactured goods and meet strict lending qualifications when private banks can't or won't provide financing. Small-business exporters like Bassett's Ice Cream can reduce risk with Ex-Im's export-credit insurance.
NEWS
June 15, 2013 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the second time this week, the Pentagon delivered good news to 6,200 workers at Boeing Co.'s Delaware County helicopter plant despite looming cuts to U.S. defense spending. Two days after receiving a $4 billion contract to build 177 CH-47F Chinook helicopters at its Ridley Township factory, Boeing said Thursday that the Navy had signed off on a $6.5 billion, five-year contract for 99 V-22 Osprey tilt-rotor aircraft. Boeing builds the Osprey - whose 20-year development has included crashes that have killed about 30 people - in a 50-50 joint venture with Bell Helicopter Textron Inc. Boeing builds the fuselage, which is shipped to Bell in Amarillo, Texas, for final assembly.
NEWS
June 13, 2013 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Boeing Co.'s Delaware County factory received a $4 billion contract from the U.S. Army to build 177 CH-47F Chinook helicopters, with deliveries starting in 2015, the defense contractor said Tuesday. The five-year deal ensures steady work at the Ridley Township facility through the end of the decade and includes options that allow the Army to purchase up to 38 more of the tandem-rotor transport helicopters, Boeing said. In an era of defense cutbacks from the winding down of wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and automatic across-the-board reductions in defense spending under a controversial federal budget agreement, a veteran defense analyst was surprised by the deal.
NEWS
June 2, 2013 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
Investigators from the Army Criminal Investigation Command on Thursday raided the headquarters of NP Precision in Folcroft, a defense contractor that manufactures rotors and landing gear for Boeing's CH-47 heavy-lift helicopter. Army investigators and other federal agents swooped down on the company about 9 a.m., said Christopher Grey, a spokesman for the Army agency. Grey declined to say why the company was being investigated. NP Precision specializes in manufacturing high-tolerance components and assembling transmissions, rotors, and landing gear for the aerospace, defense, and weapons systems industries, according to its website.
BUSINESS
March 17, 2013 | By Chris Cooper and Kiyotaka Matsuda, Bloomberg News
Boeing Co. said Friday that safety upgrades to the 787 Dreamliner's battery systems may allow commercial flights to restart within weeks, ending a two-month grounding of the composite-plastic fleet. Changes include installing a new enclosure for the battery, a focus of regulatory probes after a fire on one aircraft and smoke on another, and adjusting the charger, Boeing said in Tokyo. The device will also undergo more rigorous tests, Boeing Commercial Airplanes president Ray Conner said.
NEWS
January 31, 2013 | By Elaine Kurtenbach, Associated Press
TOKYO - All Nippon Airways and Japan Airlines said they replaced lithium-ion batteries in their Boeing 787 Dreamliners on multiple occasions before a battery-overheating incident led to the worldwide grounding of the jets. ANA said Wednesday that it replaced batteries on its 787 aircraft about 10 times because they failed to charge properly or showed other problems and that it informed Boeing about the swaps. Japan Airlines said it had also replaced lithium-ion batteries on its 787 jets, but couldn't immediately give details.
BUSINESS
January 25, 2013 | By Joan Lowy, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Obama administration officials struggled Wednesday to defend their initial statements that the Boeing 787 is safe while promising a transparent probe of mishaps involving the aircraft's batteries. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood stood by his Jan. 11 assertion that the 787, Boeing's newest and most technologically advanced airliner, was safe. At that time, LaHood and the head of the Federal Aviation Administration, Michael Huerta, declared the plane fit to fly despite a battery fire in one plane.
BUSINESS
January 18, 2013 | By Matthew Craft, Associated Press
NEW YORK - More problems for Boeing's 787 sent the aircraft maker's stock down sharply Wednesday, dragging the Dow Jones industrial average lower. Japan's two biggest airlines grounded all their Boeing 787 Dreamliners for safety checks Wednesday after one was forced to make an emergency landing. Boeing's stock sank $2.60 to $74.34, a loss of 3 percent. The Dow lost 23.66 points to close at 13,511.23. Without Boeing's drop, the Dow would have ended the day nearly flat. The Standard & Poor's 500 index inched up 0.29 to 1,472.63.
BUSINESS
January 18, 2013 | By Alan Levin and Susanna Ray, Bloomberg News
U.S. regulators temporarily grounded Boeing Co.'s 787 Dreamliner on Wednesday after an emergency landing by one of the planes in Japan that followed a fire and other incidents last week. The Federal Aviation Administration ordered airlines to prove that lithium-ion batteries in the plane, which went into service in late 2011, "are safe and in compliance," according to an e-mailed statement. Though United Continental Holdings Inc. is the only U.S. carrier operating the 787s, most other countries follow the FAA's lead in aviation safety issues.
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