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Bolero

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NEWS
April 27, 2012 | By Merilyn Jackson, FOR THE INQUIRER
What modern choreographer doesn't want to sink his teeth into making a new Bolero? Sure, everybody's done it. But Roni Koresh really made a quirky new one for Koresh Dance Company's spring opener Thursday night at its home base, the Suzanne Roberts Theatre. Koresh titled the evening's four works "Out/Line," which also was the name of the first of three world premieres on the bill. But it was his fresh take on Bolero that outshone all the other works. Bronislawa Nijinska choreographed the first Bolero, which was commissioned by Ida Rubenstein in 1928.
NEWS
March 7, 1988 | By DAVE BITTAN, Daily News Staff Writer
Maurice Ravel, brilliant composer of "Bolero," was born 113 years ago today in a French seacoast village. In a Ravel tribute, WFLN (FM/95.7) is playing his music throughout the day and evening. At 3 p.m., we'll hear Ravel conducting "Bolero," as a solo pianist on "Sonatines" and accompanying his "Chansons Madecasses. " On the 'Evening Concert" at 8, his Piano Concerto for the Left Hand is performed. Diane Raymond, program director of all-talk WWDB (FM/96.5), starts her second week as Mary Mason's replacement on the 12:20-2 p.m. WWDB (FM/96.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2004 | By Merilyn Jackson FOR THE INQUIRER
Pascal Rioult Dance Theater's The Ravel Project had its Philadelphia premiere Thursday, and it was the smartest evening so far in the already stellar DanceCelebration season at the Annenberg Center. In the four parts of the dance, completed two years ago, Rioult unflinchingly indulges his own choreographic vision. He was a member of the Martha Graham Company for eight years, but Graham's style is barely apparent in The Ravel Project. More evident are the influences of Lucinda Childs and Paul Sanasardo.
NEWS
May 21, 1992 | By Nancy Goldner, INQUIRER DANCE CRITIC
Most Great Performances programs concentrate on the work of one choreographer. The latest one, which airs tonight at 11 on Channel 12, makes a pitch for diversity by pairing a dance by Lar Lubovitch with one by Moses Pendleton and his Momix troupe. Lubovitch means to heighten our experience by showing human beings in an idealized form - as dancers pure and simple. Pendleton, meanwhile, with his surrealistic bent, makes a further jump. He turns dancers into geometric shapes, animals, creatures of the imagination.
NEWS
November 26, 2007 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Considering how central-Eurocentric the classical music world still can be, the idea of a regular Philadelphia Orchestra subscription program pairing various mutations of Hispanic and Latino culture would have seemed unworkable a few years ago. What's the repertoire? How is it sequenced? Even now, such a thing could only have been successfully pulled off - and it was - with a guest conductor such as Peru-born Miguel Harth-Bedoya and a nod to tradition with an appearance from dependable Franz Liszt.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2009 | By Ellen Dunkel FOR THE INQUIRER
It's Philadanco's 40th birthday, but the modern dance company looks as fresh and strong as ever. The troupe opened its season at the Kimmel Center Thursday night with a program that includes a world premiere, a cameo appearance, and a celebration of women's derrieres. Companies and choreographers all over the world have tackled Bolero, with varying degrees of success. Indeed, Philadanco's is the second new version in Philadelphia in just four months (BalletX premiered one in July)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 1995 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Some conductors conduct the audience. Watching their onstage maneuvers from the rear can be more entertaining than the sounds they're coaxing from the instruments on stage. That's not the case with Georges Pretre, although the Frenchman's gestures are ripe for caricature. Pretre, whose music-making exudes both geniality and flamboyance, has the manners of a gentleman from another era. When he takes a bow - and Pretre was awarded many when he conducted the Philadelphia Orchestra in its current program opening Thursday night at the Academy of Music - it's a deep and sweeping gesture, suggesting a knight's obeisance to an audience of royalty.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 1994 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Whenever I hear Bolero I can't help thinking of Bo Derek, who, in the movie 10, liked to make love to it. The exuberant way Peter Nero and the Philly Pops played it Sunday, making this oft-played music sound virtually new and spontaneous, was almost enough to make me forget Bo Derek and just revel in Ravel. Bolero gives individual performers the chance to solo, and the Philly Pops performers, who must be among the most talented musicians in the country, did so with panache. There were Pamela Guidetti, starting the action on flute; then Arne Running on clarinet; Norman Spielberg on bassoon; Dottie Freeman with her sexy oboe d'amore; then Joe Smith on a warm and glowing tenor sax and Bill Zaccagni on soprano sax; and Robert Hall on trombone - all playing to the pulsating pounding of percussionist Lou DeLise.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2012 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
Dance wends its way through the four pieces on the Philadelphia Orchestra's present program led by Giancarlo Guerrero - bolero, the Charleston, and Martha Graham. No actual dancers appear, but movement and stories are left behind - as in an elegant reading of Appalachian Spring , the 1945 version of the piece Copland first called Ballet for Martha . Thursday night in Verizon Hall, the winds (flutist David Cramer, oboist Peter Smith, clarinetist Ricardo Morales) were vehicles of sincerity and simplicity.
NEWS
February 9, 2006 | By Kathleen Brady Shea INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The clattering shackles failed to overpower the wedding bells - even if they were only in the minds of the couple. Yesterday, in a triumph of the ties that bind in marriage, an unorthodox sequence unfolded in Chester County Court: A prisoner pleaded guilty, got sentenced, and then got hitched. The honeymoon is on hold. The groom, Akram Rahan Jones, 26, of Philadelphia, a self-professed poet and repeat felon, will first spend 10 to 20 years in jail. President Judge Paula Francisco Ott approved the terms of a plea bargain that was almost as unusual as the nuptials: a three-for-one deal that combined an assault of an inmate at Chester County Prison, participation in an aborted prison riot, and conspiracy to kill a Coatesville man. The bride, Cassandra LaFortune, 25, of Philadelphia, listened intently - but without surprise.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2012 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
Dance wends its way through the four pieces on the Philadelphia Orchestra's present program led by Giancarlo Guerrero - bolero, the Charleston, and Martha Graham. No actual dancers appear, but movement and stories are left behind - as in an elegant reading of Appalachian Spring , the 1945 version of the piece Copland first called Ballet for Martha . Thursday night in Verizon Hall, the winds (flutist David Cramer, oboist Peter Smith, clarinetist Ricardo Morales) were vehicles of sincerity and simplicity.
NEWS
April 27, 2012 | By Merilyn Jackson, FOR THE INQUIRER
What modern choreographer doesn't want to sink his teeth into making a new Bolero? Sure, everybody's done it. But Roni Koresh really made a quirky new one for Koresh Dance Company's spring opener Thursday night at its home base, the Suzanne Roberts Theatre. Koresh titled the evening's four works "Out/Line," which also was the name of the first of three world premieres on the bill. But it was his fresh take on Bolero that outshone all the other works. Bronislawa Nijinska choreographed the first Bolero, which was commissioned by Ida Rubenstein in 1928.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2009 | By Ellen Dunkel FOR THE INQUIRER
It's Philadanco's 40th birthday, but the modern dance company looks as fresh and strong as ever. The troupe opened its season at the Kimmel Center Thursday night with a program that includes a world premiere, a cameo appearance, and a celebration of women's derrieres. Companies and choreographers all over the world have tackled Bolero, with varying degrees of success. Indeed, Philadanco's is the second new version in Philadelphia in just four months (BalletX premiered one in July)
NEWS
November 26, 2007 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Considering how central-Eurocentric the classical music world still can be, the idea of a regular Philadelphia Orchestra subscription program pairing various mutations of Hispanic and Latino culture would have seemed unworkable a few years ago. What's the repertoire? How is it sequenced? Even now, such a thing could only have been successfully pulled off - and it was - with a guest conductor such as Peru-born Miguel Harth-Bedoya and a nod to tradition with an appearance from dependable Franz Liszt.
NEWS
February 9, 2006 | By Kathleen Brady Shea INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The clattering shackles failed to overpower the wedding bells - even if they were only in the minds of the couple. Yesterday, in a triumph of the ties that bind in marriage, an unorthodox sequence unfolded in Chester County Court: A prisoner pleaded guilty, got sentenced, and then got hitched. The honeymoon is on hold. The groom, Akram Rahan Jones, 26, of Philadelphia, a self-professed poet and repeat felon, will first spend 10 to 20 years in jail. President Judge Paula Francisco Ott approved the terms of a plea bargain that was almost as unusual as the nuptials: a three-for-one deal that combined an assault of an inmate at Chester County Prison, participation in an aborted prison riot, and conspiracy to kill a Coatesville man. The bride, Cassandra LaFortune, 25, of Philadelphia, listened intently - but without surprise.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2004 | By Merilyn Jackson FOR THE INQUIRER
Pascal Rioult Dance Theater's The Ravel Project had its Philadelphia premiere Thursday, and it was the smartest evening so far in the already stellar DanceCelebration season at the Annenberg Center. In the four parts of the dance, completed two years ago, Rioult unflinchingly indulges his own choreographic vision. He was a member of the Martha Graham Company for eight years, but Graham's style is barely apparent in The Ravel Project. More evident are the influences of Lucinda Childs and Paul Sanasardo.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 1995 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Some conductors conduct the audience. Watching their onstage maneuvers from the rear can be more entertaining than the sounds they're coaxing from the instruments on stage. That's not the case with Georges Pretre, although the Frenchman's gestures are ripe for caricature. Pretre, whose music-making exudes both geniality and flamboyance, has the manners of a gentleman from another era. When he takes a bow - and Pretre was awarded many when he conducted the Philadelphia Orchestra in its current program opening Thursday night at the Academy of Music - it's a deep and sweeping gesture, suggesting a knight's obeisance to an audience of royalty.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 1994 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Whenever I hear Bolero I can't help thinking of Bo Derek, who, in the movie 10, liked to make love to it. The exuberant way Peter Nero and the Philly Pops played it Sunday, making this oft-played music sound virtually new and spontaneous, was almost enough to make me forget Bo Derek and just revel in Ravel. Bolero gives individual performers the chance to solo, and the Philly Pops performers, who must be among the most talented musicians in the country, did so with panache. There were Pamela Guidetti, starting the action on flute; then Arne Running on clarinet; Norman Spielberg on bassoon; Dottie Freeman with her sexy oboe d'amore; then Joe Smith on a warm and glowing tenor sax and Bill Zaccagni on soprano sax; and Robert Hall on trombone - all playing to the pulsating pounding of percussionist Lou DeLise.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 1993 | By Dan DeLuca, FOR THE INQUIRER
Sounds across the nation Coming from young hearts and minds . . . Singing songs of passion It's the truth that they all look for The one thing they must keep alive Will the Wolf survive? - Los Lobos, "Will the Wolf Survive?" David Hidalgo and Steve Berlin are remembering the bad gigs. Their band, Los Lobos, has survived for two decades now, a milestone marked by the release of the two-volume compilation album Just Another Band From East L.A. (Slash/Warner Bros.
NEWS
May 21, 1992 | By Nancy Goldner, INQUIRER DANCE CRITIC
Most Great Performances programs concentrate on the work of one choreographer. The latest one, which airs tonight at 11 on Channel 12, makes a pitch for diversity by pairing a dance by Lar Lubovitch with one by Moses Pendleton and his Momix troupe. Lubovitch means to heighten our experience by showing human beings in an idealized form - as dancers pure and simple. Pendleton, meanwhile, with his surrealistic bent, makes a further jump. He turns dancers into geometric shapes, animals, creatures of the imagination.
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