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Bomber

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NEWS
October 13, 1990 | Los Angeles Daily News
The House of Representatives yesterday voted 322-97 to sharply curtail defense spending by scrapping production of the B-2 stealth bomber and making deep cuts in other weapons programs favored by President Bush. The House adopted a $268 billion defense spending bill, $39 billion lower than Bush's budget request for fiscal 1991. The deepest cuts include a $2.4 billion reduction in funding for the Strategic Defense Initiative space shield and elimination of the B-2 bomber beyond the 15 aircraft already in production.
NEWS
August 31, 2009
TO ALL the outraged people quick to vent their feelings toward Michael Vick and the Eagles: Where is your outrage at the release of the Libyan bomber who was pardoned by the bleeding hearts in Scotland? All this louse did was send 250 people to their deaths by blowing up the plane they were on. He got a hero's welcome in Libya. Where's the outrage for this injustice? The silence is deafening. Mark Dwyer, Philadelphia
NEWS
November 9, 2015 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
Menswear inspiration, the pull toward all things sporty, and a passion for layering have converged this fall to make one of fashion's most utilitarian pieces cool - again. The trendlet This time around, bomber jackets are sweet popped over cuffed jeans, sweater dresses, and designer jumpsuits. Where's it come from? During World Wars I and II, pilots took to wearing waist-length leather jackets - with fur-trimmed collars - in fighter planes to stay warm in the open cockpits and at high altitudes.
NEWS
October 18, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK - A 21-year-old man arrested on charges he plotted to blow up the Federal Reserve building in New York City has appeared in federal court and been ordered held without bail. Quazi Nafis was arrested Wednesday morning after a sting operation. Authorities say he parked a van filled with what he believed were explosives outside the building and tried to detonate it. But his associates were actually undercover officers who arrested him at the scene - and the bomb was not real.
NEWS
April 17, 2002 | MICHELLE MALKIN
AS I HELPED my toddler get dressed the other day in a crisp white T-shirt imprinted with an American flag, I couldn't erase a heinous picture from my mind. It was an Associated Press photo taken Saturday in Berlin of a father and his little girl. He is an unidentified Palestinian demonstrator; she is riding on his shoulders with a giant poster of Yasser Arafat in the backdrop. The smiling child - no more than 4 or 5 years old - is dressed in a powder-blue sweat shirt. Maybe she picked it out herself, but what's wrapped around her waist had to be all daddy's doing.
NEWS
November 18, 1988 | By Mark Thompson, Inquirer Washington Bureau
On the eve of the public unveiling of the B-2 "Stealth" bomber, critics asserted yesterday that the new plane will not be able to accomplish its key mission of hunting down Soviet mobile missile launchers and could cost as much as $850 million each, three times more than the new B-1 bomber. Officials of the Federation of American Scientists and the Union of Concerned Scientists told reporters that the B-2, scheduled to be seen in public for the first time on Tuesday, should be scrapped.
NEWS
March 2, 2013
Maj. Thomas Griffin, 96, a B-25 bomber navigator in the daring World War II bombing raid on Japan, died Tuesday in a VA nursing home in northern Kentucky. Maj. Griffin was among 80 volunteers for the April 18, 1942, mission. The bombing run, planned by Lt. Col. James Doolittle, was credited with lifting American morale and shaking Japan in Pearl Harbor's aftermath. Maj. Griffin parachuted over China and eluded capture, eventually returning to service on bombing runs from North Africa.
NEWS
August 1, 1990 | By Mark Thompson, Inquirer Washington Bureau Inquirer staff writer Lisa Ellis contributed to this article
The House Armed Services Committee yesterday voted to halt further production of the B-2 stealth bomber and cut nearly $2 billion from President Bush's request for the "Star Wars" missile shield. Committee Chairman Les Aspin (D., Wis.) said the panel voted 34 to 20 against adding money to build more than the 15 radar-eluding planes now under construction. President Bush wants to build 75, at a cost of $840 million each. "This is the first time this committee has, in effect, voted to kill a weapon system in recent memory," one committee aide said.
NEWS
April 30, 1989 | By Howard W. Serig, Special to The Inquirer
"Grif 21, stable and ready," Air Force Capt. Mike Arnold radios the crew of a KC-135 aerial tanker looming overhead. The B-52 pilot has maneuvered his 200-ton Stratofortress to within a few yards of the flying gas station for a tricky air-to-air linkup. For five minutes he must keep the bomber "in the groove" - nearly motionless relative to the tanker - while thousands of gallons of fuel are transferred down a 5-inch-diameter pipe into the bomber's tank. Aerial refueling is critical to the Strategic Air Command's mission.
NEWS
September 27, 2011 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
Sculptor Jordan Griska couldn't talk for long Monday. "I'm in the middle of lifting an airplane," he said over the phone from his West Philadelphia studio, an old trolley shed on Haverford Avenue. The airplane in question, a decommissioned Cold War submarine bomber, has taken on a new life in Griska's hands. It has become a work of art, a sculptural installation for the pristine Lenfest Plaza. There, in the shadow of Claes Oldenburg's newly installed giant paintbrush at Broad and Cherry Streets, Griska's plane will rest, nose driven into the ground next to the historic Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts.
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NEWS
November 9, 2015 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
Menswear inspiration, the pull toward all things sporty, and a passion for layering have converged this fall to make one of fashion's most utilitarian pieces cool - again. The trendlet This time around, bomber jackets are sweet popped over cuffed jeans, sweater dresses, and designer jumpsuits. Where's it come from? During World Wars I and II, pilots took to wearing waist-length leather jackets - with fur-trimmed collars - in fighter planes to stay warm in the open cockpits and at high altitudes.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2015 | BY ELLEN GRAY, Daily News Television Critic graye@phillynews.com, 215-854-5950
* FRONTLINE: MY BROTHER'S BOMBER. 10 tonight, Oct. 6 and Oct. 13, WHYY12. KEN DORNSTEIN'S story reads like a feature film. A man who's spent his career behind the scenes of a TV news magazine decides to leave behind his wife and two young children and sneak into Libya, a country in turmoil, in search of the people who might be responsible for the murder of his older brother, and 269 others, in the 1988 bombing of Pan Am 103. Starting tonight,...
NEWS
August 11, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IT WAS OK to be afraid; it was not OK to panic. Fear was natural for the men who flew the bombers over Germany in World War II. It rode with them in their planes like a living entity. But if you panicked, you couldn't do your job. That was the way Joe Blinebury described what it was like in those B-17 Flying Fortresses that carried the war to the enemy with dangerous daylight bombing. Oddly, Joe, who flew 35 missions over Germany, said he calmed down when he slipped into the ball turret, his position under the belly of the plane.
NEWS
June 26, 2015 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
BOSTON - Johanna Hantel got up Wednesday morning and went for a half-hour run around Boston Commons. It seemed appropriate. The Malvern woman was in Boston to speak for the runners. Hantel was 10 feet from the first bomb, closer than almost any other runner, when it exploded April 15, 2013, killing three and injuring 254. A police officer later died in a shootout with the bombers. One of the proudest days of Hantel's life was the first time she qualified for Boston. Wednesday was even prouder.
NEWS
February 14, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a verdict likely to challenge Pennsylvania's law defining a "weapon of mass destruction," a Philadelphia jury Thursday found a Germantown artist guilty of that crime in a May incident in which he blew off most of his right hand with a homemade explosive. The Common Pleas Court jury of 10 women and two men deliberated about 21/2 hours before returning the verdict against Douglas Ferrin, 55. Ferrin, who spent about six months in prison for blowing up the toilet in a Phoenixville bar in 2011, did not appear to react to the verdict.
NEWS
September 23, 2014 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
Last of two parts (Find the first part here ) The back-to-school party called for costumes, so Trent University students came as ghosts and witches, moving in and out of the redbrick rooming house at 283 W. King St. in Peterborough, Ontario, all night. That complicated the task for Canadian police staking out the place. Two men on the FBI's 10 Most Wanted List, suspects from the deadly University of Wisconsin bombing 11 days earlier, had been tracked to the corner house in Peterborough, 65 miles northwest of Toronto.
NEWS
November 12, 2013 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
The veterans were in their late teens and early 20s when they fought in places that most people now know only from history books: Normandy, the Ardennes, Iwo Jima, and Okinawa. But as the nation marks Veterans Day, 70 years later, their memories of World War II remain vivid, as if the physical and mental wounds of their service had been much more recent. Sam Laskin, 93, of Lower Providence Township, clearly recalls piloting a B-24 bomber, dubbed "Mean Kid," over a German target in France in 1944 when flak passed through his plane, seat, and right leg before exiting the fuselage.
NEWS
July 21, 2013 | By Jay Lindsay, Associated Press
BOSTON - After a week of chaos, the suspect in the deadly Boston Marathon bombings emerged from his hiding spot bloodied and seemingly exhausted - the red dot of a sniper's rifle lighting his forehead. Photos of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev by a state police officer give a glimpse into the end of an episode that kept the city and its suburbs on edge. The images, the first of Tsarnaev from that night in April, were released to Boston Magazine on Thursday by a state police photographer angry about a Rolling Stone cover shot of Tsarnaev and hoping to counter what he said was the music magazine's glamorization of the terror suspect.
NEWS
June 23, 2013 | By Adam Schreck, Associated Press
BAGHDAD - A suicide bombing inside a Shiite mosque during evening prayers and other attacks north of Baghdad killed 23 people in Iraq on Saturday, as officials announced preliminary results for local elections in two provinces that showed the bloc of the country's speaker of parliament in the lead. The attacks are the latest in a wave of killing that has claimed more than 2,000 lives since the start of April. It is the bloodiest and most sustained spate of violence to hit Iraq since 2008.
NEWS
June 13, 2013 | By Jay Price and Rezwan Natiq, McCLATCHY FOREIGN STAFF
KABUL, Afghanistan - A suicide bomber detonated an explosives-packed car outside a gate at the Afghan Supreme Court during the afternoon rush hour Tuesday, killing 17 people and wounding 38, all of them civilians, Afghan officials said. It was the second consecutive day that insurgents staged a significant suicide attack in the capital, and it raised again the question of whether the Afghan government can ensure security from Taliban attackers. On Monday, a failed Taliban attack on the military side of the Kabul airport killed seven attackers and did little damage.
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