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Bonnie And Clyde

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NEWS
December 4, 2007 | By Robert Moran, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The couple dubbed the "Bonnie and Clyde" of identity theft returned to their Center City condo today, creating unease among neighbors still trying to figure out whether they had been victimized by the pair, police said. Meanwhile, investigators said they had yet to determine whether there was a connection between the couple's illegal possession of keys to other condo units and mailboxes and the fact that Edward Anderton formerly worked for a company that developed the condo building.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2010
GIMME FIVE Philadelphia native Arthur Penn died this week, leaving a body of work that moved fluidly between the monumental and the quirky. 1. "Bonnie and Clyde. " (1967) 2. "The Miracle Worker. " (1962) 3. "Alice's Restaurant. " (1969) 4. "Night Moves. " (1975) 5. "Little Big Man. " (1970)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 1998 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Ever since Arthur Penn's Bonnie and Clyde exploded on the screen in 1967, other directors have been stealing from his landmark film. The movie used one pivotal decade in modern American history - the Depression of the '30s - to address young audiences in the '60s. Bonnie and Clyde, with Warren Beatty as the drifter-turned-bank robber Clyde Barrow and Faye Dunaway as Bonnie Parker, the woman who joins his enterprise, was roundly denounced for its violence when it came out. Today, its techniques - such as filming action with cameras set at different speeds - have been imitated to the point of cliche, and the violence seems rather tame.
NEWS
May 24, 1990 | Special to The Inquirer / PAOLA NOGUERAS
With pony rides and trips in a hay wagon, the annual fair of Brandywine- Wallace Elementary School in Guthriesville harked back to the dreams of young cowboys and cowgirls. The theme of the fair Saturday was "A Day at the Range. " About 1,500 people, including parents and pupils in kindergarten through sixth grade, attended the fair. The activities included a talent contest in lip syncing, a baking contest, a karate demonstraton and games. Bonnie and Clyde, a pair of Clydesdales, were in harness for the hayrides.
NEWS
August 1, 1993 | By DAVID R. BOLDT
The current society-wide awakening to the pernicious effects of what Tom Wolfe has termed "pornoviolence" on television and in the movies raises a number of questions, such as, "What took us so long?" And, "Where did we go wrong? I have a theory on the latter that may, in turn, possibly shed some light on the former. Specifically, I think we went wrong with the release of Bonnie and Clyde 26 years ago, in August of 1967. I don't have a lot of convincing research to back this up. Certainly I had no clear realization when it first came out that Bonnie and Clyde was the first in a wave of movies that came to the screen immediately after Hollywood's self-policing apparatus was dismantled in 1966, intent on exploring the outer reaches of the envelope in terms of depicting violence and sex. And I had no idea that 1967 would be the year cited by chroniclers of Hollywood as the year in which the movie industry lost its hold on the American mass audience.
NEWS
June 9, 2008
ENOUGH already about the couple your paper and Philly.com insist on calling "Bonnie and Clyde. " What is the fascination? Is it that they are white or young or educated or attractive or arrogant or stupid or self-centered? Is this stuff selling newspapers? They're crooks and should get no more ink than the thousands of others reported on every day, and then fade into oblivion. What they did was despicable - but enough, please! Joseph A. Farrell, Philadelphia Re Stu's column: Bonnie and Clyde ought to get 10 years in a state prison - not some federal country club.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 1990 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Before Warren Beatty was the fedora-wearing law-enforcer Dick Tracy, he was the fedora-wearing outlaw Clyde Barrow in Bonnie and Clyde (1967). Directed by Arthur Penn, this amoral, violent yarn of two Depression kids on a bank- robbing spree made Beatty an icon. And, by the way, it made the screen careers of Faye Dunaway and Gene Hackman. While in its time, Bonnie and Clyde embodied a hip, anti-authoritarian sensibility, seen today it acknowledges other things:that in America, an outlaw is a celebrity, and that celebrity is the most potent aphrodisiac.
NEWS
February 15, 1999 | By John Timpane
They were small people. Bonnie was 4'10", Clyde was 5'6". They arose from a Southwest pounded by a decade of sandstorms and abandoned by a system that didn't care. For four years they led the law on a small-time crime spree. Hollywood rediscovered them in 1967, when Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway caused a sensation with a film that somehow turned two desperate, criminal lives into the stuff of haute couture. Their last two years, they lived mostly in their cars. Clyde Barrow preferred Ford V8s. They were faster than anything most police had. With them they carried up to 20 rifles, 10 or more pistols, and 10,000-15,000 rounds of ammunition, including metal-jacketed slugs that would rip out a man's heart at 200 feet.
NEWS
October 21, 1997 | By Tamara Audi, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
They're no Bonnie and Clyde, police say, but Sam and Tashika apparently had found their niche: repeatedly knocking off the same adult-book store. Samuel Fuller, 38, and Tashika Fayall, 27, both of Philadelphia, were arrested yesterday morning on their way out of Edwards Bookstore after allegedly tying up the clerk with a phone cord, threatening to kill him with a hammer, and taking $1,800 in cash - for the second time. A third man, who police believe is from Philadelphia, is also being sought.
NEWS
November 1, 1990 | By Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
To a casual observer, the story ex-Police Officer Dave Farley told yesterday might sound like something out of the old Keystone Kops capers. Farley, a veteran Philadelphia cop, goes after a major drug dealer without telling his superiors. To gain the dealer's confidence he poses as a cop on the take, only to learn too late that the drug dealer, George Reicherter, had turned informant and set up Farley by recording incriminating conversations. At the climax, heavily armed police swarm into a parking lot, disarm and arrest Farley.
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NEWS
June 29, 2012 | By Regina Medina and Daily News Staff Writer
OH BOY, here we go again.   The former Drexel University student with a penchant for Olympic pole-vaulting tales and romantic horseback rides on the beach — yes, Jocelyn Kirsch — was arrested this month in California for shoplifting and other crimes, law-enforcement authorities said Thursday. What could have possibly led to her alleged relapse? A handbag, label unknown, police said. Kirsch's June 17 felony arrest at a Walnut Creek mall also violates her federal probation, and she again may have to face a federal judge and possibly go back to jail.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 2012 | By Carolyn Hax
Question: Any advice on how to keep bouncing back when life keeps sending bad news your way? I feel like that ambush scene in Bonnie and Clyde when the cops keep shooting way after Bonnie and Clyde have probably died. My father died of ALS in July, my mother has ovarian cancer and her chemo isn't working, our dog is 15 and on his last legs (no pun intended), and my freelance business is in the tank due to the recession. I'm talking with a therapist each week but still feel swallowed up by the never-ending crap tsunami.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 2011 | By Mark Kennedy, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Start spreading the news: The musical based on the film Newsies is striking a path to Broadway. Disney Theatrical Productions said Tuesday that the show would begin a limited run at the Nederlander Theatre in March. It had a critically acclaimed debut in September at the Paper Mill Playhouse in Millburn, N.J. "It just plays like a great, classic musical with this wonderful choreography," said Thomas Schumacher, president of Disney Theatrical Productions, the theatrical-production arm of the Walt Disney Co. "It's fun. " The new musical is based on the true story of child newspaper sellers in turn-of-the-century New York who go on strike.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2010
GIMME FIVE Philadelphia native Arthur Penn died this week, leaving a body of work that moved fluidly between the monumental and the quirky. 1. "Bonnie and Clyde. " (1967) 2. "The Miracle Worker. " (1962) 3. "Alice's Restaurant. " (1969) 4. "Night Moves. " (1975) 5. "Little Big Man. " (1970)
NEWS
September 30, 2010 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Arthur Penn, the Philadelphia-born director whose rhapsodically violent portrait of Depression-era outlaws Bonnie Parker and Clyde Darrow - 1967's Bonnie and Clyde - stands as one of the pivotal American movies of the 20th century, died late Tuesday, of congestive heart failure, one day after his 88th birthday. Although he directed only 13 features - and stopped altogether in the mid-1990s - Mr. Penn, who came to filmmaking after pioneering stints in theater and live television, is responsible for some of the most iconic screen images of the 1960s and 1970s.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2010
Stories By David Means Faber and Faber. 164 pp. $23 Reviewed by David L. Ulin If you're looking for a key to The Spot , David Means' fourth collection of short fiction, you need go no further than the title story. In it, Means gives us a looping narrative, or a series of overlapping story lines, at the center of which is a gaping emptiness. It's too matter-of-fact to be despair. Hope, when it exists at all, is an illusion, a bit of wish fulfillment or maybe just a trick of the light.
NEWS
June 13, 2010 | By George Anastasia and Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writers
ATLANTIC CITY - They were staying at the Plaza, a posh, 14-story condominium complex with a pool and cabana abutting the Boardwalk at South Plaza Place. He lived on the sixth floor. She would come and go, sometimes staying for up to three days, said Carlos Battista, who works in the valet-parking garage there. "They were quiet," Battista said last week. "But there was something about them. . . . You knew there was trouble. " Big trouble, it appears. Battista, who works the night shift at the garage, unwittingly played a role in the apprehension of Craig Arno and Jessica Kisby, charged last week in the carjacking-killing of casino patron Martin Caballero on May 21. Arno, 44, and Kisby, 24, have been portrayed by some in law enforcement as a lowlife Bonnie and Clyde, based on a violent, weeklong rampage that authorities say included murder, kidnapping, carjacking, arson, robbery, and shoplifting.
NEWS
April 20, 2010 | By John Timpane INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Volcano a show stopper That pesky Eyjafjallaj?kull volcano - its eruption grounded, like, two-thirds of Europe's air traffic, and now it's also messing up the entertainment world. Last weekend, the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival in Indio, Calif., lost acts such as The Cribs, Bad Lieutenant and Frightened Rabbit to the ash clouds. The Tribeca Film Festival in Manhattan, which begins Wednesday, might suffer, too, with some stars and filmmakers stuck in Europe. Some say NYC could lose as much as $250 mil. Whitney Houston took matters into her own hands.
NEWS
November 15, 2008 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Honor student, star athlete, scholarship student at the University of Pennsylvania, Edward K. Anderton graduated in 2005 with a degree in economics, an immediate $65,000-a-year job, a new girlfriend and a bright future. That future was past yesterday as Anderton was sentenced to four years in prison for an identity-theft scam with ex-girlfriend Jocelyn Kirsch that betrayed friends, neighbors and coworkers to fund what the judge called "a lavish lifestyle. " For a year the pair - popularly dubbed "Bonnie and Clyde" - traveled internationally on about $116,000 from about 50 victims whose financial information they stole.
NEWS
November 15, 2008 | By WENDY RUDERMAN, rudermw@phillynews.com 215-854-2860
Maybe it was her fake boobs, or violet-colored contact lenses, or her bodacious, bikini-clad body. Whatever the allure, Edward Anderton seemed to have lost his head when he met Jocelyn Kirsch, his ex-lover. Yesterday, he lost his freedom, too. Anderton, 25, the brainy half of the identity-theft duo known as "Bonnie and Clyde," was sentenced to four years in federal prison without chance of parole. At the sentencing, Anderton stood before the judge and accepted responsibility and expressed remorse for a year-long crime spree in which he and Kirsch stole more than $119,000 to fund a lavish, jet-setting lifestyle.
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