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NEWS
January 9, 1994 | By Karin Braedt, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Brett Cummings, a third grader at the Edison Elementary School, has a new buddy after interviewing Becky Galiazzi, a first grader, and writing a personalized A-B-C book about her. "She is my best friend," Brett said. "We do a lot of things together now. " Brett's book reads as follows: "Becky likes Apples" (for the letter A); "Becky likes Blue" (for the letter B); "Becky likes Candy" (you've figured it out by now). The book is part of roughly 20 handmade biographies produced by the schoolchildren as part of what is called a self-esteem project.
NEWS
May 28, 2014 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
Seventy years after being sprayed with shrapnel during the Battle of the Bulge, former Army Pfc. Herman Chidekel was awarded the Purple Heart on Monday for his service during World War II. Chidekel, 88, of Glen Mills, was discharged from the Army in 1945, went to college, started a family, and worked in book publishing. He had largely forgotten about his injuries until recently, when he was getting an MRI and the metal remnants of his war wounds interfered with the test. "They did an X-ray and there it was, shrapnel all up and down one of his legs," said Maj. Gen. Louis H. Guernsey Jr., who presented the medal at a ceremony after the Radnor Memorial Day Parade.
LIVING
December 12, 2004 | By Carlin Romano INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC
Every year at this time, book buyers want more between their covers - a coffee-table book, which has come to mean a book as large as a coffee-table, not something that goes on one. No one in book publishing knows exactly why. Jewelers don't make their rings larger as Thanksgiving launches the shopping season. Florists don't start selling 600-rose bouquets. But book buyers want big. This year's holiday offerings, like every year's, cover the waterfront from inspired, elegant and sublime to contrived, cliched and combustible.
NEWS
April 12, 2002
THE CLOSING of Oprah's Book Club is being mourned by American publishers as well as readers. Last week, she announced that she was finding it increasingly hard to find a good book each month. While we're big Oprah fans, we wish she had been more thoughtful in her seeming dismissal of a few hundred years of literature. What she has actually run out of is the supply of struggling-woman-picking-herself-up-by-her-sandal-straps tales of redemption. So if we won't necessarily miss the kind of books Oprah touted, we will miss her power to enrich the bank accounts of struggling writers.
NEWS
March 28, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lawrence "Larry" Teacher, 72, of Philadelphia, cofounder of Running Press Book Publishers and husband of photojournalist Sharon J. Wohlmuth, died Tuesday, March 25, of a heart ailment at home. Mr. Teacher teamed with his brother, Stuart "Buz" Teacher, in 1972 to establish Running Press, an independent publishing house in Philadelphia. The brothers were the first in their family to delve into book publishing, although the family had a long history as booksellers. Mr. Teacher focused on editorial and contractual duties while his brother headed the production and design departments.
NEWS
December 6, 2001 | Daily News Wire Services
An African-American lawyer and banker with ties to three presidents will take over AOL Time Warner, the world's largest media company. Richard Parsons, 53, will replace the retiring Gerald Levin as CEO of the company, whose businesses span movies, television, publishing, professional sports, and the Internet. "I have the greatest confidence in Dick Parsons' ability to lead the company forward, coalesce its diverse interests, and work with our strategic partners to achieve our ambitious goals," Levin said in a statement.
BUSINESS
May 24, 2000 | By Michael D. Schaffer and Annette John-Hall, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
The tradition-laden book publishing industry logged on to the future yesterday when three publishing giants and Microsoft Corp. announced ventures aimed at encouraging people to read books on computers. Time Warner Inc. announced that it would create an imprint, iPublish.com, early next year to distribute books via the Internet. The move was designed to take "traditional Gutenberg" book publishing "into the 21st century," Laurence J. Kirshbaum, chairman and CEO of Time Warner Trade Publishing, said in a telephone interview.
LIVING
January 18, 1998 | By Thomas J. Brady, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The curious thing about William the Curious: Knight of the Water Lilies (Random House, $18) is that there was little interest in publishing it when Charles Santore wrote it 25 years ago. William the Curious is the first book that Santore, well known as an illustrator of children's books, not only illustrated but wrote. While he was building a reputation for illustrating other people's words, environmental disasters such as the Love Canal and the Exxon Valdez oil spill were setting the stage for publication of his own original story about pollution in a castle moat.
NEWS
March 14, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
There's a strange contradiction, an ironic knot, at the heart of TV news in America. While a mind-boggling number of hours are devoted each day to news - on 24-hour news channels, the many news reports and talk shows on the networks and their websites - we seem to get very little of the actual stuff. The situation infuriates journalist Eddy Moretti, one of the creators of Vice , a half-hour weekly newsmagazine on HBO that returns for a second season Friday at 11 p.m. "It's amazing, they have so many hours they could use to ask about so many other stories," Moretti said in a phone chat.
NEWS
June 7, 2005 | By Carlin Romano INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC
What happens when BookExpo America (BEA), the annual rite that brings together the national book publishing industry, takes place in the city that still dominates the industry? For one thing, it becomes a three-day learning experience. "It's so valuable to young people just coming into the business," says George Gibson, president and publisher of Walker & Co., sitting in the Javits Convention Center, watching some of the 30,000-plus booksellers, authors, editors and journalists who attended last weekend stroll by. "Not just to understand what the convention is," the veteran executive goes on, "but to see the industry at large.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 28, 2014 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was 2006 when Joy Stocke and Kimberly Nagy did the unthinkable: They essentially converted the highly regarded literary magazine the Bucks County Writer - founded in 1998 and published by the Writers Room of Bucks County - to an online journal. "We were told we were going to fail," Stocke recalled. In reality, failure was the likely outcome if the magazine remained in print form, she said. "We could no longer afford to distribute print," said Stocke, 57, who, as a literary journalist, author, and community organizer of writers, took over the Doylestown-based nonprofit Bucks County Writer in May 2003, editing it until the winter of 2006.
NEWS
May 28, 2014 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
Seventy years after being sprayed with shrapnel during the Battle of the Bulge, former Army Pfc. Herman Chidekel was awarded the Purple Heart on Monday for his service during World War II. Chidekel, 88, of Glen Mills, was discharged from the Army in 1945, went to college, started a family, and worked in book publishing. He had largely forgotten about his injuries until recently, when he was getting an MRI and the metal remnants of his war wounds interfered with the test. "They did an X-ray and there it was, shrapnel all up and down one of his legs," said Maj. Gen. Louis H. Guernsey Jr., who presented the medal at a ceremony after the Radnor Memorial Day Parade.
NEWS
March 28, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lawrence "Larry" Teacher, 72, of Philadelphia, cofounder of Running Press Book Publishers and husband of photojournalist Sharon J. Wohlmuth, died Tuesday, March 25, of a heart ailment at home. Mr. Teacher teamed with his brother, Stuart "Buz" Teacher, in 1972 to establish Running Press, an independent publishing house in Philadelphia. The brothers were the first in their family to delve into book publishing, although the family had a long history as booksellers. Mr. Teacher focused on editorial and contractual duties while his brother headed the production and design departments.
NEWS
March 14, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
There's a strange contradiction, an ironic knot, at the heart of TV news in America. While a mind-boggling number of hours are devoted each day to news - on 24-hour news channels, the many news reports and talk shows on the networks and their websites - we seem to get very little of the actual stuff. The situation infuriates journalist Eddy Moretti, one of the creators of Vice , a half-hour weekly newsmagazine on HBO that returns for a second season Friday at 11 p.m. "It's amazing, they have so many hours they could use to ask about so many other stories," Moretti said in a phone chat.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2012 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nothing is forever. Except, perhaps, good literature. That's what Johnny Depp is banking on with his new book imprint, Infinitum Nihil ("nothing is forever"), which he's launching in partnership with HarperCollins Publishers. The company, says Depp, will scour the heavens and earth to find "authentic, outspoken and visionary ideas and voices" for the imprint. "I pledge, on behalf of Infinitum Nihil, that we will do our best to deliver publications worthy of people's time, of people's concern, publications that might ordinarily never have breached the parapet," Depp said.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2012 | Howard Gensler
Local comic-book publisher Zenescope is on a roll and the latest proof is that Lionsgate TV is going down "‘Alice in Wonderland's" rabbit hole.   The studio that brought you "Mad Men" has emerged the winner for TV rights to Zenescope's "Wonderland" graphic novels, the company's editor in chief, Ralph Tedesco, told People Paper Comics Guy Jerome Maida. "I recently went to Los Angeles to pitch the property for TV, which was the first time we really focused on pitching for television," Tedesco said.
SPORTS
June 19, 2012 | By William Bender and Daily News Staff Writer
REMEMBER Tim Donaghy? Delco native. Ex-referee in the NBA. Recovering gambling addict. Felon. Yeah, that guy. A Florida jury wants to make him a millionaire. After 5 rough years that included banishment from the NBA, gambling and wire-fraud convictions for betting on basketball games, and even 2 weeks spent in solitary confinement "like Charles Manson" while serving a 15-month prison term, Donaghy can finally put one in the win column. According to Donaghy and his lawyer, a St. Petersburg jury on Friday awarded Donaghy $1.3 million in his civil suit against Shawna Vercher and her now-defunct company VTi Group, which published Donaghy's tell-all book about the NBA and its referees.
NEWS
December 27, 2008 | By Kathleen Brady Shea INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Peter Berwind Schiffer, 60, who parlayed a family background in farming and antiques into a specialty publishing business, died Dec. 19 of a heart attack. Mr. Schiffer, who was born in Bryn Mawr, ran Schiffer Publishing Ltd., a Chester County company that "grew from the kitchen table," said his wife of 35 years, Nancy Nutt Schiffer. It began when he saw a need in the mid-1970s to bring back some out-of-print niche books, his wife said. "At first, we had no idea what we were doing," Nancy Schiffer said.
NEWS
September 10, 2008 | By John Timpane INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
How do you get a kid to open a book? And once it's open, how do you get a kid to keep reading, book after book? At Ferguson Elementary School in North Philadelphia yesterday, educators and publishers rolled out a brand-new answer to those questions. It's called The 39 Clues, and it's aimed at readers 8 to 12. Yes, there are books: a series of 10, the first of which is now in bookstores. But there's also an Internet game (www.the39clues.com), in which the user can become part of the story.
NEWS
June 25, 2008 | By Carlin Romano INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC
Judy Blume. Dean Koontz. Jon Krakauer. Ted Turner. Big names that get big attention. Especially when book people get together. At the annual BookExpo America that took place in Los Angeles this month - the echo chamber where publishers pitch their wares to booksellers and literary journalists - huge publicity campaigns can make it seem as if book publishing is only about marquee names. But many books most appealing to particular regions of the country lie back in the expo's hundreds of modest booths, awaiting discovery.
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