CollectionsBook Reports
IN THE NEWS

Book Reports

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 28, 1992 | By Karen Rouse, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
While many children are deciding which camp to attend or which amusement park to visit, New Hanover eighth grader Nicholas De Lay, 13, must also decide how to complete two book reports. "It's OK," Nicholas said, "It's only two book reports, and we have two to three months to do it. It's something to do on a rainy Sunday. " While all the sixth, seventh, and eighth graders at the New Hanover Township School may not share in Nicholas' confidence, they are all required to read two books this summer and produce two book reports on the first day of school.
NEWS
April 1, 1993 | By Lisa L. Colangelo, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Motivating a group of squirmy third graders to read is no easy task. So why are the book reports piling up on Beverly Lee's desk at the Manor Park Elementary School? Because Lee, a Pennsbury High School graduate who has been teaching in the school district for six years, knows that few youngsters will turn down an afternoon of lunch and shopping at the mall. Lee has designed a program for her students that encourages independent reading and rewards students for their efforts.
NEWS
July 24, 1992 | By D. O'Reilly, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER This includes information from the New York Daily News, Associated Press and USA Today
Is it possible that Michael Jackson is even more eccentric than the world ever imagined? Could be. Jackson's former housekeepers Mark and Faye Quindoy will appear on Geraldo Rivera's TV talk show today to reveal that Jackson wears stage makeup all day long, scribbles songs on his bedsheets, pays an employee $28.50 an hour to change his monkeys' disposable diapers, and eats specialty dishes named for Disney characters. "We never saw him without his makeup on. He would do it (put it on)
NEWS
April 1, 2010 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On a March day in 1967, Louis J. Kripplebauer Jr. walked into a Philadelphia courtroom to be charged with an $81,000 burglary at a Food Fair store in 1965. He walked away free because a judge determined that police had used a defective search warrant. But Mr. Kripplebauer then grew out of neighborhood crimes like that heist at I Street and Hunting Park Avenue. In August 1976, at 40, he was sentenced to federal prison after pleading no contest to charges that he and others stole $250,000 in silverware and other valuables in a Houston suburb and shipped them back to Philadelphia.
SPORTS
November 12, 1991 | the Inquirer Staff
Michael Jordan told the Chicago Bulls not to pass the ball to teammate Bill Cartwright in the closing minutes of games and once punched teammate Will Perdue in the head at practice, according to an advance copy of a book that is to be published soon. The Chicago Sun-Times said it had obtained an advance copy of The Jordan Rules, by Chicago Tribune sportswriter Sam Smith, and published accounts of the book yesterday. The book reportedly details the infighting the Bulls overcame to win the NBA title last season.
NEWS
April 29, 2001 | By Gloria A. Hoffner INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Reading a required story and writing a report have led to a nontraditional route for students at Sabold and Scenic Hills Elementary Schools. After all, how many children see their book reports sung by a Broadway performer? The fourth-grade students are becoming lyricists by creating original songs to tell story themes. The project is directed by Arts for Anyone, a nonprofit organization that brings professional musicians and actors to schools to perform selections from a classroom book, said Bruce D. Taylor, director of the program.
NEWS
October 31, 2006 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was Jonathan Maberry's Scottish grandmother who put vampires into his life. And the Warrington writer is gruesomely grateful. Citadel Press recently published his Vampire Universe: The Dark World of Supernatural Beings That Haunt Us, Hunt Us, and Hunger for Us. His first book about the big, bad bats, Vampire Slayers' Field Guide to the Undead, was published in 2003 by Strider Nolan. Maberry's mother's mother was born in the 1880s near Edinburgh and raised in Alsace-Lorraine.
NEWS
June 27, 1992 | By ELLEN GOODMAN
As a certified member of the pre-post-literate generation, I still think of "summer" as an adjective for "reading. " My school days may be long past, but this always feels like the time between semesters when we can read for pleasure. A teacher friend insists that this reading habit carbon-dates me as ancient. She specializes in the modern aliterate - students who can read but don't want to. Every year, she sends her classes off on vacation with reading instructions. Last year, they came back with "book reports" of novels that had - surprise!
NEWS
May 30, 1992 | By Yana Ginburg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Principal George Young wanted his 418 students at Denbo Elementary School in Browns Mills to read. So he made them a bet last spring: If you and your teachers read a total of 80,000 - yes, 80 thousand - books this year, I'll sit on the roof for a day. TVs were turned off. Parents set aside special reading times. The school library went into overdrive. Children's book reports poured in. The months flew by. And George Young spent yesterday on the roof. The Denbo pupils, dressed up as characters from their books, tilted their heads, cheered and rattled tambourines as their 53-year-old principal climbed a 30-foot ladder.
NEWS
July 26, 2001 | By Joann Klimkiewicz INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
When three rowdy boys, ages 12 and 13 and charged with disorderly conduct, ended up before District Justice Deborah Truscello-McHugh about a year ago, she knew that merely slapping them with fines wouldn't do. She needed something that would rattle them awake, something that would keep them off the streets and out of her courtroom - something like a book club. Now a youngster found guilty of such a minor offense as disorderly conduct or underage drinking may be given three months to read a book assigned by the judge and write a five-page report.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 20, 2013 | By Elizabeth Mosier
For authors these days, socializing is a sales tool - though on a Friday night, most of us are more likely to be at home mingling on social media than out at an actual party. But here we are in Haverford, at Children's Book World's 21st annual Celebration of Local Authors and Illustrators - dressed up, sipping wine, and shopping for each other's books before the beloved store's loyal customers arrive. I'm balancing Beth Kephart's Small Damages and David Wiesner's The Three Pigs , favorite books by writers whose work I admired before we met here and became friends.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2012 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
The case for - or is it against? - Michelle Obama: "One, she's black," says James B. Peterson, associate professor of English and director of the Africana studies department at Lehigh University. "Two, she's assertive. Three, she's smart. Four, she's strong. Five, she's a great political mind. And we can't forgive her for it. " In a new book, The Obamas , by New York Times reporter Jodi Kantor, Michelle Obama is depicted as often at odds with the West Wing staff, pushing for health-care reform.
NEWS
April 1, 2010 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On a March day in 1967, Louis J. Kripplebauer Jr. walked into a Philadelphia courtroom to be charged with an $81,000 burglary at a Food Fair store in 1965. He walked away free because a judge determined that police had used a defective search warrant. But Mr. Kripplebauer then grew out of neighborhood crimes like that heist at I Street and Hunting Park Avenue. In August 1976, at 40, he was sentenced to federal prison after pleading no contest to charges that he and others stole $250,000 in silverware and other valuables in a Houston suburb and shipped them back to Philadelphia.
NEWS
October 31, 2006 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was Jonathan Maberry's Scottish grandmother who put vampires into his life. And the Warrington writer is gruesomely grateful. Citadel Press recently published his Vampire Universe: The Dark World of Supernatural Beings That Haunt Us, Hunt Us, and Hunger for Us. His first book about the big, bad bats, Vampire Slayers' Field Guide to the Undead, was published in 2003 by Strider Nolan. Maberry's mother's mother was born in the 1880s near Edinburgh and raised in Alsace-Lorraine.
NEWS
July 26, 2001 | By Joann Klimkiewicz INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
When three rowdy boys, ages 12 and 13 and charged with disorderly conduct, ended up before District Justice Deborah Truscello-McHugh about a year ago, she knew that merely slapping them with fines wouldn't do. She needed something that would rattle them awake, something that would keep them off the streets and out of her courtroom - something like a book club. Now a youngster found guilty of such a minor offense as disorderly conduct or underage drinking may be given three months to read a book assigned by the judge and write a five-page report.
NEWS
April 29, 2001 | By Gloria A. Hoffner INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Reading a required story and writing a report have led to a nontraditional route for students at Sabold and Scenic Hills Elementary Schools. After all, how many children see their book reports sung by a Broadway performer? The fourth-grade students are becoming lyricists by creating original songs to tell story themes. The project is directed by Arts for Anyone, a nonprofit organization that brings professional musicians and actors to schools to perform selections from a classroom book, said Bruce D. Taylor, director of the program.
NEWS
August 14, 1999 | by Kevin Haney, Daily News Staff Writer
Many of the people supervising the education of public school children need to learn more about balancing the public checkbook, a city controller's report has found. The report, tracking the School District's financial reporting through the 1997-1998 school year, found a variety of thefts, missing school property and lax bookkeeping involving $5.5 million in spending at schools and district offices. Over $28,000 in cash and bus tokens were stolen during the school year, the controller's office said.
NEWS
November 15, 1995 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Five days after prosecutor Marcia Clark signed a book deal worth $4.2 million, attorney Johnnie Cochran Jr., her victorious adversary in the O.J. Simpson trial, has worked out plans to write his own memoir - but reports differed on who won the prize this time. According to sources cited by the Los Angeles Times, Cochran's deal with Ballantine Group "slightly exceeds" the $4.2 million advance obtained by Clark. But Newsday reported that Cochran's figure was between $3 million and $4.2 million.
NEWS
January 3, 1995 | By Russell Gold, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In a bizarre sidelight to one of Pennsylvania's strangest electoral sagas, voter registration material from the Second State Senate District that disappeared the night before November's election turned up yesterday next to a Burger King in Bucks County. The books had been missing since Nov. 7, when an election official reported they were stolen with her van. City election officials yesterday discounted the possibility that the missing books could have affected the result of November's very close election.
NEWS
April 15, 1993 | by Joe Clark, Daily News Staff Writer
It doesn't matter how many show up - which usually isn't many - the tour goes on. Even if it's only one person, the excursion shoves off at the stroke of 11. "If a living body shows up, and we have a staff member to do it, we do it," says head guide Frank Halpern. "It's rare to get more than a couple. " Rare . . . Halpern uses the word a lot. It's rare when he gets through a conversation without saying it. Guy just can't help it. Guess it's because he's surrounded by all kinds of rare stuff, not the least of which is Grip, a rare bird if there ever was one. More about Grip later.
1 | 2 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|