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ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2007
So few book reviews, so many books. No, it hasn't started appearing on T-shirts yet, but wait. For the last half year, thanks in part to vigorous noisemaking by the National Book Critics Circle and its energetic president, Swarthmore grad John Freeman, the publishing world has done almost as much talking about the "book review crisis" as it has about the rectangular objects it sells. So far in September, no fewer than five panels in New York, at venues from Columbia Journalism School to Scandinavia House, have been devoted to some version of the "The Vanishing Book Review.
LIVING
March 11, 1999 | By Lea Sitton Stanley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gadabout Harry Jay Katz is doing a little legwork for a Council candidate and he goes down to the basement looking for her photo and he finds the stuff from Ira Einhorn. Correspondence and book reviews from the hippie murder suspect, neatly printed nearly 20 years ago in capital letters on white, lined notebook paper or yellow legal pad, and mailed from Canada. (Einhorn, out on bail, knew no travel restrictions.) Katz, publisher of the now-defunct Center City entertainment weekly ELECTRICity, had hired Einhorn as book editor after his arrest because "he kind of needed a gig and he's brilliant.
NEWS
March 14, 1989 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Edward Weeks, 91, former editor of the Atlantic Monthly magazine and the Atlantic Monthly Press, died Saturday at his home. Mr. Weeks edited the Press from 1928 to 1937 and the magazine from 1938 to 1966, the longest tenure in its history. Under his guidance, the Press published such best-sellers as Walter Edmond's Drums Along the Mohawk, Charles Bernard Nordoff's and James Norman Hall's Mutiny on the Bounty and James Hilton's Goodbye Mr. Chips. He also introduced writings of unknown authors who later gained international fame.
NEWS
February 13, 2012
Carl Hartman, 95, an Associated Press correspondent in Europe during much of the turbulent mid-20th century and one of the news cooperative's longest-serving journalists, has died. The Morristown, N.J., native died at his Washington apartment, said Nancy Thompson, a friend who, worried that Mr. Hartman was not answering his telephone, opened his residence to police who found his body on Wednesday. There was no evidence of foul play. Mr. Hartman retired from the AP in 2006 after 62 years but continued writing book reviews.
NEWS
December 17, 2012 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Harriette Behringer Fussell, 86, formerly of Center City, a journalist and public relations executive who was an advocate for women's rights, died Wednesday, Nov. 14, at a long-term care home in Medford, Ore. She had lived in Oregon for the last two years to be close to family. For 10 years until moving to Philadelphia in 1983, Mrs. Fussell was director of public and community relations for the International Xerox Training Center in Leesburg, Va. At Xerox, she developed women's-rights projects during a yearlong sabbatical.
NEWS
December 9, 1994 | BY DONALD KAUL
I ran across a quotation the other day that struck me like a blow between the eyes, or maybe just above the eyes in the middle of the forehead. Anyway, up there somewhere. "Newspaper work draws people who like to cut corners, deal superficially with subjects, make generalizations without support and read book reviews rather than books. " My God, I thought, that's my autobiography. A critic named Carlin Romano said it and, although I'm not familiar with his work, he had us newspaper people down pretty good.
NEWS
December 7, 2012 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Harriette Behringer Fussell, 86, formerly of Center City, a journalist and public relations executive who was an advocate for women's rights, died Wednesday, Nov. 14, at a long-term care home in Medford, Ore. She had moved to Oregon two years ago to be close to family. For 10 years, until moving to Philadelphia in 1983, Mrs. Fussell was director of public and community relations for the International Xerox Training Center in Leesburg, Va. At Xerox, she developed women's rights projects during a yearlong sabbatical.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 1990 | By Renee Lucas Wayne, Daily News Staff Writer
The corpse in the window won't know "whodunnit," but Norma Frank and Robert Nissenbaum will. They won't tell you, though. Proprietors of the new Mystery Books in Ardmore, Frank and Nissenbaum own the only store in the area where time after time a leisurely chill out leads to a rub-out. Personable, knowledgeable and well-read when it comes to the genre, the husband and wife team have been trading professionally in the cold hard facts of murder, mayhem and other crimes since they opened the store in May. "We opened the store because we like to read mysteries and were having trouble finding the books we wanted," Frank explained.
NEWS
June 29, 1988 | By Richard Cohen
Damn you, Stephen Hawking. Damn you and your A Brief History of Time, which sits on the best-seller lists and which has been praised as a scientific book written for the layman - an important book about the beginnings of the universe, of time and matter and the "unified theory" that would explain everything: everything, that is, but how the layman can possibly be expected to understand this book. A theoretical physicist at Cambridge University, Hawking is famous both for his gifts and his misfortune.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 1986 | By Jill Gerston, Inquirer Staff Writer
People, People who read People, Are the most puzzled people in the world . . . . What are devoted readers to make of the latest issue of the celebrity gossip bible? "The 25 Most Irritating People of 1985"? Irritating? Nancy Reagan, Mary Lou Retton, Sylvester Stallone, Phil Donahue, Claus von Bulow (with a hypodermic syringe, no less) . . . enshrined together on a bright red cover? Really, People, is nothing sacred? Apparently not. The cover is just for starters.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 21, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Scan the book reviews and you'd think The Triple Package: How Three Unlikely Traits Explain the Rise and Fall of Cultural Groups in America was the latest manifesto from the Klu Klux Klan. A follow-up to her best-selling 2011 memoir Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother , Amy Chua's new book is a sociological study - complete with plenty of statistics, academic references and endnotes - that tries to pinpoint why certain cultural and ethnic groups have had more economic and social success in America than others.
NEWS
December 17, 2012 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Harriette Behringer Fussell, 86, formerly of Center City, a journalist and public relations executive who was an advocate for women's rights, died Wednesday, Nov. 14, at a long-term care home in Medford, Ore. She had lived in Oregon for the last two years to be close to family. For 10 years until moving to Philadelphia in 1983, Mrs. Fussell was director of public and community relations for the International Xerox Training Center in Leesburg, Va. At Xerox, she developed women's-rights projects during a yearlong sabbatical.
NEWS
December 7, 2012 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Harriette Behringer Fussell, 86, formerly of Center City, a journalist and public relations executive who was an advocate for women's rights, died Wednesday, Nov. 14, at a long-term care home in Medford, Ore. She had moved to Oregon two years ago to be close to family. For 10 years, until moving to Philadelphia in 1983, Mrs. Fussell was director of public and community relations for the International Xerox Training Center in Leesburg, Va. At Xerox, she developed women's rights projects during a yearlong sabbatical.
NEWS
October 3, 2012 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
I WOULDN'T NORMALLY feel sorry for a man like Bernie Cohen. At 86, he's had a vibrant life. He's been married to the same sweetheart, Selma, for more than six decades and is a proud father and grandfather. Although he's long retired as a clinical psychologist, he's still a professor emeritus at West Chester University, where he taught for years. And he had a fine career in private practice and managed a bustling psychiatric clinic in Norristown. He may move a little slowly, but his wits are quick and his eyes crinkle when he delivers the punch line of a favorite joke.
NEWS
May 27, 2012 | Freelance
Redefining Diva Life Lessons From the Original Dreamgirl By Sheryl Lee Ralph Gallery Books/Karen Hunter Publishing. 224 pp. $14 Reviewed by Karen E. Quinones Miller       Many people who are asked to describe a diva would say that it's a demanding and arrogant woman who believes she's entitled to having all of her needs met, even at the expense of the inconvenience of others. In fact, diva is often considered synonymous with a less polite word starting with "b. "   But in a new book, actress Sheryl Lee Ralph (best known for playing Deena in Dreamgirls, the role reprised by Beyoncé in the movie based on the huge Broadway hit, and stepmother to singer/actress Brandy in the hit television show Moesha)
NEWS
May 20, 2012 | Reviewed by Allen Barra
Bill Veeck Baseball's Greatest Maverick By Paul Dickson Walker & Company. 448 pp. $28   Why did it take so long for the most colorful and perhaps most influential figure in baseball history to get a definitive biography? Probably because it took more than 20 years after Bill Veeck's death (in 1986) to put all the facets of his amazing life together. With Bill Veeck: Baseball's Greatest Maverick, Paul Dickson, author of several superb baseball books, has done more than write the best baseball biography so far this decade.
NEWS
May 20, 2012 | Reviewed by Thomas Devaney
Transfer By Naomi Shihab Nye BOA Editions. 119 pp. $16   Naomi Shihab Nye is one of the most spirited voices in American poetry. The author, editor, and translator of more than 30 volumes, she is best known for her poetry collections Fuel (1998) and You and Yours (2005), and her award-winning anthology of international poems for young people This Same Sky (1992), which represents 129 poets from 68 countries. In her affirming introduction for that book, she writes, "Whenever someone suggests ‘how much is lost in translation!
NEWS
May 13, 2012 | Reviewed by Charles Desnoyers
Autumn in the Heavenly Kingdom China, the West, and the Epic Story of the Taiping Civil War By Stephen R. Platt Alfred A. Knopf. 478 pp. $30 One of history's least-known conflicts for Westerners is also one of its bloodiest. China's Taiping Rebellion, from 1851 to 1864, is estimated to have killed 20 million to 30 million people, making it the most sanguinary internal war in human history. Americans, of course, tend to focus their historical attention during these years on the trauma of their own Civil War. Yet, as Stephen Platt observes in his well-researched, highly readable account of the Taiping movement, there are unsuspected connections linking the two conflicts.
NEWS
May 13, 2012 | Reviewed by R. C. Barajas
Anatolian Days & Nights A Love Affair with Turkey By Joy E. Stocke and Angie Brenner Wild River Books. 264 pp. $16.95 Toward the end of Anatolian Days & Nights, a 12-year-old boy, tour guide for a day to the two authors, encourages them to take shards of pottery that lie amid the rubble of the ancient Turkish city of Harran. "There are so many pots to choose from and all of them so very old, ladies. So old it makes my head hurt," he says. The honest, childlike remark seems to encapsulate the modern-day view of this intensely complex, richly fabled country.
NEWS
May 13, 2012 | Reviewed by David Kairys
Rights at Risk The Limits of Liberty in Modern America By David K. Shipler Alfred A. Knopf. 400 pp. $28.95 Best-selling author and Pulitzer Prize winner David Shipler believes America has "lost its way" since 9/11. "Constitutional rights are routinely overwhelmed," he says in his new book, Rights at Risk, "largely out of sight in criminal courts and interrogation rooms, in offices of prosecutors and immigration bureaucrats, and in schools. " While we talk about freedom and liberty a lot, there has been little opposition as the Patriot Act empowered the federal government to ask store owners what books we buy and what videos we rent, and to compile these and our political preferences in government files.
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