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NEWS
November 27, 1987 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Edgar Berman, 72, a physician and author who gained notoriety for saying that women could not be leaders because of their "raging hormones," has died of a heart attack. Dr. Berman was pronounced dead Wednesday at Sinai Hospital after he was stricken while driving near his home Tuesday night. In the 1950s, he successfully completed the first implantation of a plastic esophagus in a human and assisted in the first heart transplant in a dog. Dr. Berman, the physician of former senator and vice president Hubert H. Humphrey, wrote books about Humphrey and Albert Schweitzer, with whom he worked in Africa in 1960.
LIVING
September 4, 2009 | By Sally Friedman FOR THE INQUIRER
From the curb, the home of Molefi Kete Asante and his wife Ana Yenenga looks like many well-manicured stone split levels in Elkins Park. Inside, however, it springs to life with striking signs of African heritage around every corner. And no wonder. Molefi Asante, 67, professor and former chairman of the Department of African American Studies at Temple University, has earned international recognition as one of the most distinguished scholars in his field, with no fewer than 70 books to his credit.
NEWS
August 26, 2005
Thank you, Ocean City, for a wonderful month. After years of talking about it, my husband and I decided to spend July at the Shore. We rented the top floor of a duplex. The first two weeks, we shared the apartment with my brother and sister-in-law. The second two weeks, friends joined us. We did all the things we had talked about all winter: bike rides in the morning, afternoons on the beach, day trips to Atlantic City, Cape May and Rehoboth, and walks on the boardwalk at night.
NEWS
November 8, 1988 | G. LOIE GROSSMANN/ DAILY NEWS
Ralph Brooks Jr., the 7-year-old South Philadelphia boy paralyzed by a suspected drug dealer's bullet in July, arrives at school in a paratransit bus yesterday to start in the second grade.
NEWS
July 25, 1992
You know librarians, they're always trying to give away books (provided people agree to return them). Nothing newsworthy there . . . except that at the Free Library of Philadelphia, they've done a rather spectacular job of giving out books in the last 12 months. Library officials report that the central library and 53 neighborhood branches circulated some six million volumes during the fiscal year ending June 30. That's the highest count since 1966, the period city librarians reverentially refer to as the Free Library's "heyday," when 6.2 million tomes were borrowed.
NEWS
February 15, 1996 | by Yvonne Dennis, Daily News Staff Writer
JumpStart, A Love Story Robb Armstrong (HarperCollins / $12) A VALENTINE KISS Carla Fredd, Brenda Jackson, Felicia Mason (Pinnacle / $4.99) If you're saving your sweetie's Valentine treat for the weekend (or you just plain forgot), two new books appealing to the traditionally mushy and the playfully poetic may be just the ticket. Philly resident Robb Armstrong moves his JumpStart comic strip up to the big time with his first full-length cartoon, "JumpStart, A Love Story.
BUSINESS
October 20, 1990 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / WILLIAM F. STEINMETZ
The opening of Borders Book Shop in Center City yesterday invited browsing and the sampling of coffee in a corner espresso bar. In the former Nan Duskin building at 1727 Walnut St., it is the 11th of a Michigan chain known for its large selection and hard-to-find books.
NEWS
May 2, 1993 | For The Inquirer / J. MICHAEL McDYRE
The Great American Read-Aloud gave books a voice, and it gave many shoppers something different to do at the Springfield Mall on April 24. The event was sponsored by the Delaware County Library.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 17, 2015 | By Sofiya Ballin, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Bethenny Frankel speaks, she's direct and unblinking. Honesty is very much a part of her brand - and her fans love her for it. More than 200 of them lined the VIP Shopper's Lounge for Frankel's appearance Saturday as part of the four-day grand-opening celebration at the Gloucester Premium Outlets in Blackwood. Fans cradled bottles of Skinnygirl alcoholic drinks or Frankel's books, ready for her signature. "She's real," Heather Blum, 40, said. "I never met a celebrity like that.
NEWS
August 14, 2015 | By Justine McDaniel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Shelves of books may evoke peace and quiet, but it has been a season of turmoil for the Kennett Public Library. Board member resignations, a controversial name change, and a renewed debate about the library's location have raised concerns about the future of the Chester County library. Leaders of the library in Kennett Square, formerly known as the Bayard Taylor Memorial Library, say they are making changes - and reconsidering a plan to move out of the borough. But library critics have called for creating a task force to intervene.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2015 | By Molly Eichel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tom Fitzgerald and Lorenzo Marquez entered their ninth year of blogging at tomandlorenzo.com by trying something new: a podcast. The Philly celebrity-fashion writers have cultivated a devout following - referred to as "bitter kittens" - by critiquing celebrity fashion. They also love TV, taking time to talk about whatever they're watching. Fitzgerald and Marquez have been together for 19 years and made it official when Pennsylvania legalized gay marriage. That's quite evident in the podcast, in which they lovingly banter back and forth in their Old City loft.
NEWS
August 10, 2015 | By Lisa Scottoline, Inquirer Columnist
If you read me, you know that I get jazzed about certain products. And then I spread the word, herein. I'd like to do that right now, with a short preface before I get to the point. This, instead of my usual endless preface before I get to the point. Getting to the point isn't all it's cracked up to be. So here we go. First, my favorite product in the world is my books. If you enjoy these Sunday stories, they're all collected in books I write with Daughter Francesca, and you should buy some and read them right away.
NEWS
August 10, 2015 | By Molly Eichel, Inquirer Staff Writer
The tour rider is a window into old-school rock star success. It's a list of stipulations in which musicians can make extravagant demands to promoters at tour venues. Madonna's leaked tour rider asked for 20 international phone lines. Mötley Crüe demanded a list of local AA meetings, a submachine gun, a 12-foot boa constrictor, and Grey Poupon. Van Halen notoriously asked for M&Ms but no brown ones. What about world-renowned, Philadelphia-born-and-based DJ King Britt? He asks promoters to give him a paperback book he might like.
NEWS
July 25, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Rev. James Robert Tanis, 87, formerly of Villanova, a minister, a scholar, and a professor and director of libraries at Bryn Mawr College, died Sunday, July 19, of respiratory failure at Shannondell in Audubon. He had lived at the senior community for more than a decade. He grew up in Phillipsburg, N.J., where he was born. Dr. Tanis earned a bachelor's degree in history from Yale University; a master of divinity degree from Union Theological Seminary, New York City, in 1954; and a doctor of theology degree in 1967 from Utrecht University in the Netherlands.
NEWS
July 20, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
The path to David Casarett's new book began when one of his patients at Penn Medicine's Wissahickon Hospice asked him if medical marijuana could help her. As usual with such questions, he scoffed, telling her the drug was still illegal and there was no evidence to support its use. His patient, a retired English professor, pushed him for more information. He discovered that there was indeed research, and she knew more about it than he did. "She was tough," he said. He promised he would look into it for her. That was about a year and a half ago. The result of his quest - Stoned: A Doctor's Case for Medical Marijuana - was published last week.
NEWS
July 13, 2015 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Columnist
Ant-Man is upon us. On Friday, another superhero heads to the multiplexes. A Silver Age brethren of Iron Man, Spider-Man, and Thor, Ant-Man is, um, a little different. Sure, he has the superhuman strength, the supercool costume, and the supersmart-alecky retorts of a Marvel Comics crimebuster. But this guy is less than an inch high, and if he joined his fellow Formicidae in an invasion of your kitchen pantry, you'd grab the Raid and gun him down with the rest of the pests. How can this tiny speck possibly do battle with evil masterminds bent on world domination?
NEWS
July 13, 2015 | By Lini S. Kadaba, For The Inquirer
Paul McCartney keeps a piano bedside to try out musical ideas that come to him in the middle of the night. Screenwriter Aaron Sorkin ( The West Wing , Sports Night ) overcomes writer's block by taking six or more showers a day. And John Kounios, a pioneer in the study of insight, rides the quiet Regional Rail car on his commute to and from his West Chester home so he can carve out a creative, idea-inducing space for himself. The Drexel University professor of psychology further isolates himself by donning noise-canceling Bose headphones (to block the rumble of the train)
BUSINESS
July 12, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
American Airlines will transfer US Airways passenger bookings to the American reservations system the weekend of July 18, for travel beginning 90 days later, on Oct. 17. Airport check-in kiosks, gates, and ticket counters will get new American signage. The US Airways website will disappear at that time, American announced Friday, a key step in blending the two airlines under their 2013 merger agreement. Philadelphia International Airport is a hub for US Airways and American, which operate 460 daily flights and have 77 percent of the air travel market here.
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