CollectionsBooks
IN THE NEWS

Books

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 27, 1987 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Edgar Berman, 72, a physician and author who gained notoriety for saying that women could not be leaders because of their "raging hormones," has died of a heart attack. Dr. Berman was pronounced dead Wednesday at Sinai Hospital after he was stricken while driving near his home Tuesday night. In the 1950s, he successfully completed the first implantation of a plastic esophagus in a human and assisted in the first heart transplant in a dog. Dr. Berman, the physician of former senator and vice president Hubert H. Humphrey, wrote books about Humphrey and Albert Schweitzer, with whom he worked in Africa in 1960.
LIVING
September 4, 2009 | By Sally Friedman FOR THE INQUIRER
From the curb, the home of Molefi Kete Asante and his wife Ana Yenenga looks like many well-manicured stone split levels in Elkins Park. Inside, however, it springs to life with striking signs of African heritage around every corner. And no wonder. Molefi Asante, 67, professor and former chairman of the Department of African American Studies at Temple University, has earned international recognition as one of the most distinguished scholars in his field, with no fewer than 70 books to his credit.
NEWS
August 26, 2005
Thank you, Ocean City, for a wonderful month. After years of talking about it, my husband and I decided to spend July at the Shore. We rented the top floor of a duplex. The first two weeks, we shared the apartment with my brother and sister-in-law. The second two weeks, friends joined us. We did all the things we had talked about all winter: bike rides in the morning, afternoons on the beach, day trips to Atlantic City, Cape May and Rehoboth, and walks on the boardwalk at night.
NEWS
November 8, 1988 | G. LOIE GROSSMANN/ DAILY NEWS
Ralph Brooks Jr., the 7-year-old South Philadelphia boy paralyzed by a suspected drug dealer's bullet in July, arrives at school in a paratransit bus yesterday to start in the second grade.
NEWS
July 25, 1992
You know librarians, they're always trying to give away books (provided people agree to return them). Nothing newsworthy there . . . except that at the Free Library of Philadelphia, they've done a rather spectacular job of giving out books in the last 12 months. Library officials report that the central library and 53 neighborhood branches circulated some six million volumes during the fiscal year ending June 30. That's the highest count since 1966, the period city librarians reverentially refer to as the Free Library's "heyday," when 6.2 million tomes were borrowed.
NEWS
February 15, 1996 | by Yvonne Dennis, Daily News Staff Writer
JumpStart, A Love Story Robb Armstrong (HarperCollins / $12) A VALENTINE KISS Carla Fredd, Brenda Jackson, Felicia Mason (Pinnacle / $4.99) If you're saving your sweetie's Valentine treat for the weekend (or you just plain forgot), two new books appealing to the traditionally mushy and the playfully poetic may be just the ticket. Philly resident Robb Armstrong moves his JumpStart comic strip up to the big time with his first full-length cartoon, "JumpStart, A Love Story.
BUSINESS
October 20, 1990 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / WILLIAM F. STEINMETZ
The opening of Borders Book Shop in Center City yesterday invited browsing and the sampling of coffee in a corner espresso bar. In the former Nan Duskin building at 1727 Walnut St., it is the 11th of a Michigan chain known for its large selection and hard-to-find books.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 17, 2015 | By Art Carey, For The Inquirer
Rob Garfield knows he is fighting an uphill battle. He has written an important book about men, friendship, and emotional intimacy, and he knows most men aren't inclined to buy such books. In fact, most books are bought by women, and unless they are especially concerned about the welfare of the men in their lives, they, too, may not be as responsive as they should to a book with the title Breaking the Male Code - Unlocking the Power of Friendship: Overcoming Male Isolation for a Longer, Happier Life.
NEWS
May 11, 2015
Hardcover For the week ended May 10, compiled by Nielsen BookScan © 2015 the Nielsen Co. Fiction 1. Gathering Prey John Sandford. Putnam. $29 2. Memory Man David Baldacci. Grand Central. $28 3. The Girl on the Train Paula Hawkins. Riverhead. $27 4. The Liar Nora Roberts. Putnam. $28 5. The Bone Tree Greg Iles. Morrow. $28 6. Death Wears a Beauty Mask Mary Higgins Clark. Simon & Schuster.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2015 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
The 2015 Philadelphia International Children's Festival at the Annenberg Center celebrates its 31st year Friday and Saturday with a plethora of performances: The acrobatic Pilobolus Dance Theater mixes dance, theater, and technology (ages 5 and older; 10 a.m. Friday). The Catherine Wheels Theatre Company drama Lifeboat is about two teen girls struggling to survive after their ship is torpedoed during World War II (ages 8 and older; 10 a.m. and noon Friday; noon and 2 p.m. Saturday)
SPORTS
May 8, 2015 | BY GARRETT MILEY, For the Daily News
MOST COLLEGE students are busy. Most student-athletes are even busier. You don't know busy until you've seen Saint Joseph's graduate student Myra McCann's color-coded planner. In addition to pursuing her master's degree, she is a redshirt senior coxswain on the women's rowing team and a Miss New Jersey contestant. She also helps with the Precious Gem Pageant in New Jersey, a pageant for girls with special needs. With the Dad Vail Regatta coming up this weekend, McCann and her teammates are eager for the challenge that the largest intercollegiate rowing event in the United States will provide.
NEWS
May 1, 2015 | BY BETH D'ADDONO, For the Daily News
MENTION the name Claude Monet, and most people think of the acclaimed French artist whom many consider the father of Impressionism. And, while it's true that Monet's work will be prominently featured in the blockbuster show "Discovering the Impressionists: Paul Durand-Ruel and the New Painting," making its only U.S. stop at the Philadelphia Museum of Art starting June 24, Monet himself said, "My garden is my most beautiful masterpiece. " A closer study finds the man as driven by his palate as his palette.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
David Wiesner is beloved for his picture books, lavishly illustrated Caldecott Medal-winners that invite children to tumble, like Alice down the rabbit hole, into strange, sideways universes. But, a few years ago, he got a taste of the forbidden fruit, by way of an Apple store. He wandered in and was mesmerized by the iPad, with all its pinching, zooming, and swiping capabilities. And so, at age 59, the Chestnut Hill resident has ventured from the cozy confines of the children's book section to the infinite expanse of the App Store.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
"I have just one ground rule when I visit book clubs," novelist Nomi Eve said. "My standard phrase is, 'I have a thick skin, but it's not that thick, so please be nice to me.' " It's just as well that Eve's fans take her words to heart. Over the last six months, the lifelong Elkins Park resident has visited 90 book clubs to discuss her latest novel, Henna House . "I go into so many people's living rooms, and if they beat up on me, I'll come home every night crying," said Eve, who turned 47 last month.
NEWS
April 20, 2015 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
SALLY GUARIGLIA believes that eyes are portals to a person's true self, so when she first saw Savannah Harvey's sea-green peepers, she knew that the sophomore from Moore College of Art & Design was a kindred soul. "Look at those eyes!" Guariglia, 75, exclaimed while she and Harvey worked on Guariglia's memory book of digital photographs at the South Philadelphia Older Adult Center, on East Passyunk Avenue near Dickinson Street. Harvey is among Moore College art-education majors teaching digital photography to 16 senior citizens at the center and helping them handcraft memory books with their photos.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
At first, Pivot's new series Fortitude sounded like an oddity: an English-language murder mystery set on a remote Norwegian island, populated by a cast of characters from every corner of the Earth, including Scandinavians of all stripes, Brits, Americans, Spaniards, and Russians. It was a curiosity. Yet, it was also highly addictive and seriously, severely suspenseful. Writer-producer Simon Donald's 10-episode drama is now available for home entertainment courtesy of PBS Video. Fortitude excels in just about every way: The cast, the setting, and the story all are superb.
NEWS
March 30, 2015 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
JEFF BENJAMIN has no plans to run for mayor. He's doing fine as managing partner of the Vetri family of restaurants - seven eateries he co-owns with founding chef Marc Vetri and two others. He probably gets a better paycheck than the current occupant of City Hall's Room 215 does, too. But whoever replaces Mayor Nutter in 2016 should hire Benjamin as a consultant. Not because City Hall needs craft brews on tap. (Although wouldn't that make the budget hearings a gas?) But because Benjamin knows that no business can survive if it takes its customers for granted.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|