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NEWS
November 27, 1987 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Edgar Berman, 72, a physician and author who gained notoriety for saying that women could not be leaders because of their "raging hormones," has died of a heart attack. Dr. Berman was pronounced dead Wednesday at Sinai Hospital after he was stricken while driving near his home Tuesday night. In the 1950s, he successfully completed the first implantation of a plastic esophagus in a human and assisted in the first heart transplant in a dog. Dr. Berman, the physician of former senator and vice president Hubert H. Humphrey, wrote books about Humphrey and Albert Schweitzer, with whom he worked in Africa in 1960.
LIVING
September 4, 2009 | By Sally Friedman FOR THE INQUIRER
From the curb, the home of Molefi Kete Asante and his wife Ana Yenenga looks like many well-manicured stone split levels in Elkins Park. Inside, however, it springs to life with striking signs of African heritage around every corner. And no wonder. Molefi Asante, 67, professor and former chairman of the Department of African American Studies at Temple University, has earned international recognition as one of the most distinguished scholars in his field, with no fewer than 70 books to his credit.
NEWS
August 26, 2005
Thank you, Ocean City, for a wonderful month. After years of talking about it, my husband and I decided to spend July at the Shore. We rented the top floor of a duplex. The first two weeks, we shared the apartment with my brother and sister-in-law. The second two weeks, friends joined us. We did all the things we had talked about all winter: bike rides in the morning, afternoons on the beach, day trips to Atlantic City, Cape May and Rehoboth, and walks on the boardwalk at night.
NEWS
November 8, 1988 | G. LOIE GROSSMANN/ DAILY NEWS
Ralph Brooks Jr., the 7-year-old South Philadelphia boy paralyzed by a suspected drug dealer's bullet in July, arrives at school in a paratransit bus yesterday to start in the second grade.
NEWS
July 25, 1992
You know librarians, they're always trying to give away books (provided people agree to return them). Nothing newsworthy there . . . except that at the Free Library of Philadelphia, they've done a rather spectacular job of giving out books in the last 12 months. Library officials report that the central library and 53 neighborhood branches circulated some six million volumes during the fiscal year ending June 30. That's the highest count since 1966, the period city librarians reverentially refer to as the Free Library's "heyday," when 6.2 million tomes were borrowed.
NEWS
February 15, 1996 | by Yvonne Dennis, Daily News Staff Writer
JumpStart, A Love Story Robb Armstrong (HarperCollins / $12) A VALENTINE KISS Carla Fredd, Brenda Jackson, Felicia Mason (Pinnacle / $4.99) If you're saving your sweetie's Valentine treat for the weekend (or you just plain forgot), two new books appealing to the traditionally mushy and the playfully poetic may be just the ticket. Philly resident Robb Armstrong moves his JumpStart comic strip up to the big time with his first full-length cartoon, "JumpStart, A Love Story.
BUSINESS
October 20, 1990 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / WILLIAM F. STEINMETZ
The opening of Borders Book Shop in Center City yesterday invited browsing and the sampling of coffee in a corner espresso bar. In the former Nan Duskin building at 1727 Walnut St., it is the 11th of a Michigan chain known for its large selection and hard-to-find books.
NEWS
May 2, 1993 | For The Inquirer / J. MICHAEL McDYRE
The Great American Read-Aloud gave books a voice, and it gave many shoppers something different to do at the Springfield Mall on April 24. The event was sponsored by the Delaware County Library.
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NEWS
July 15, 2016 | By Jerome Maida, FOR PHILLY.COM/GEEK
If you have been to a recent Wizard World Philly or are a fan of VH1's Mob Wives , chances are you are familiar with Marissa Jade. Jade's profile looks to get far bigger in the near future, as a character she helped create for a comic book, "Destiny: Queen of Thieves", has just been green lit for a feature film! In an exclusive interview with Daily News Comics Guy, Jade shared how excited she is about the project, how it came to be and why she feels it will be a huge success.
TRAVEL
July 10, 2016
Name: KidsTravel Books.com. What it does: You can browse children's books from all over the world to learn about other cultures, prepare for a trip, read book reviews and author interviews, get family travel tips, and more. What's hot : The depth of global coverage on Kids TravelBooks is unexpected and comprehensive, with books arranged by continent and country. I want to go to the Dominican Republic, but I'm not quite ready to book a flight. I wondered if it had any kids' books on it, clicked the link, and found four books that I could buy that might help me make a decision.
SPORTS
July 7, 2016 | By Mike Sielski, Inquirer Columnist
The line inside the Chester County Book Company numbered more than 100, snaking around the inside of the store, and when Lenny Dykstra arrived at 7:15 Tuesday night, he came in through the back door, and the people parted for him. He sat down at a mahogany table in the middle of the store, and some of the people applauded. Wearing a coral-colored golf shirt, khakis, a beige "U.S. Open 2002" baseball cap, and a graying mustache, he had finished a radio interview in Old City at 5:45, then hopped in the back of a town car to fight traffic to this shopping development in West Chester.
NEWS
July 6, 2016
"Go Tell the Bees That I Am Gone. " That's the title of the 9th (possibly last?) book in the "Outlander" series by Diana Gabaldon, the basis for the hit Starz TV show "Outlander. " Gabaldon explained on Facebook that "It's a very old Celtic custom (known in other parts of Europe, too) that made it to the Appalachians. You always tell the bees when someone is born, dies, comes or goes - because if you don't keep them informed, they'll fly away. " Season 2 on Starz is based on "Dragonfly in Amber," the second book in the series.
NEWS
July 4, 2016 | By Kevin Riordan, Columnist
"When they pulled up the rug," Deborah Marchand says, "they found this . " We're admiring a glorious terrazzo floor under the rotunda of the Haddonfield Public Library, where a $2.2 million, 15-month restoration, renovation, and repurposing project is nearly complete. The goal, library board president Marchand adds, was "to take what had been a fairly inflexible space and make it more flexible and open and welcoming. " Haddonfield has done all that and then some: A sneak peek last week left me impressed by how seamlessly the old has been freshened up and blended with the new inside the Monticello-esque landmark at Tanner Street and Haddon Avenue.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 2016 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Fashion Writer
Pat Cleveland is absolutely lovely. But of course she is. Cleveland was one of the world's first supermodels, one of the first African American cover girls in the 1970s, and a favorite of the era's top designers: Bill Blass, Stephen Burrows, and Halston. So yes, at 66, it's not surprising that Cleveland still has a light voice, an easy smile. She appears not to have a care in the world. How does she stay so whimsical and full of joy? She keeps a "no-mad" existence. "You don't get mad. You keep it moving," Cleveland told me from her Willingboro home, her accent unmistakably New York, despite the years she spent living in London, Paris, and Milan.
NEWS
June 26, 2016 | By Carolyn Hax, Advice Columnist
Adapted from a recent online discussion. Question: I'll be 38 when I deliver my first child next year, and I'm thrilled about being a mom, but also a little intimidated. My husband and I moved to a new city not long ago, so I'm several hours away from my closest girlfriends, and while I have made new friends, most of them are younger, single, and childless. Do you have any suggestions on how to find other moms who can sympathize with the glories of going through this at an "advanced maternal age"?
NEWS
June 20, 2016 | By Steven Rea, Columnist
Steven Spielberg's The BFG , which debuted last month at Cannes and comes to theaters July 1, is an appropriately big adaptation of a characteristically strange Roald Dahl story, first published in 1982, about an orphan girl (played by the very-Dahlish sounding Ruby Barnhill) scooped up and taken away in the dead of night by a big friendly giant. The towering BFG takes the diminutive SLG (scared little girl?) clear across England to the land of giants, where she becomes less scared, and he becomes more open to the notions of friendship, feelings, and the benevolent power of the British monarchy.
NEWS
June 19, 2016
String Theory David Foster Wallace on Tennis Introduction by John Jeremiah Sullivan Library of America. 144 pp. $19.95 Reviewed by Peter Lewis I have a theory. This theory, I suggest, explains the quality of David Foster Wallace's tennis writing, collected in String Theory - its savvy, if not its scintillation, though knowingness may be father to dazzle. My theory is this: anxiety sweat. In high school, Wallace sweated excessively, which, however cooling, is not cool.
NEWS
June 17, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Lewis Becker, 78, of Villanova, a law professor at Villanova University for more than four decades, died Sunday, June 12, of complications from glioblastoma brain cancer at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. He had been diagnosed in March, his family said. Professor Becker joined what is now Villanova's Charles Widger School of Law in 1972, rose to professor in 1976, and retired in 2011 as an emeritus professor, although he kept teaching for several more years. "Professor Becker left an indelible mark on the Law School community and the generations of students he educated and inspired," the school said in a tribute on its Facebook page.
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