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NEWS
September 27, 1990 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, Special to The Inquirer
The traditional silence usually found in a library was broken in the Tredyffrin Public Library on Sunday afternoon as violins, guitars and banjos played to celebrate its reopening after extensive renovations. "We were never really closed," said Marian A. Stevens, director of the library. "I'm proud to say we were only closed for five days during the process, when we had absolutely no electricity last November. " More than 100 visitors came to see the changes at the 14-year-old library on Upper Gulph Road in Strafford.
NEWS
February 16, 1990 | By Darryl Lynette Figueroa, Daily News Staff Writer
When Taller Puertorriqueno opened its glass doors to el Bloque de Oro in 1985, a group of curious Puerto Rican teen-agers stumbled in. They looked at the books lining sparkling white walls. They peered at colorful tiles and art objects displayed in glass cases. Then they asked what this was all about. When they were told that the building would serve as a cultural center with a Latino art gallery, and that all the books they saw were written by Puerto Rican authors, the kids responded with awe. One said, "We didn't think our people even wrote," recalled a Taller staffer.
LIVING
January 15, 2010 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
Barry S. Slosberg Inc. will offer words and music next week with two major sales - one devoted to books, the other to musical instruments and accessories. The books, from the library of the late West Chester collector Paul Rodebaugh, will be auctioned beginning at 6 p.m. Thursday at the gallery, 2501 E. Ontario St. It is the second session of the liquidation, with at least one more session planned for May. The top lots among the more than 250, about half of which also will be made available at www.liveauctioneers.
NEWS
April 8, 1990 | By Charlie Frush, Inquirer Staff Writer
At the library in Holy Cross High School, the student who doesn't know where to locate certain books or reference materials nevertheless stands a good chance of finding someone who can. Mary Kane is that someone. Nearly 25 years of shuffling books on the Riverside school's shelves has given her a certain sense of where things are, but if that fails, all is not lost. "I'm blessed with a good memory that has helped me through the years," she said. "Once I've touched something or worked on something, if it's lost, we can find it again.
NEWS
June 12, 2000 | By Valerie Reed, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Third grader Max Ephraim knew his plan was ambitious. He wanted to collect "2,000 or under" books for those in need. With the help of a couple of friends, he distributed fliers to his classmates at Buckingham Elementary School. Max, Catherine Perry and Rich O'Brien also performed a skit during the lunch periods to generate interest in the project. Their promotional campaign paid off. During the month of May, children carried in armfuls of their old favorites and parents lugged in boxes from home.
NEWS
July 24, 1999 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
As owner of a Christian book store in North Philadelphia, Gregory Sizer espoused a strange philosophy for one who sold Bibles and religious tracts. Forget the adage about turning swords into ploughshares. Sizer's sales pitch was more like praise the Lord and pass the ammo. It took some time, but Sizer has finally confessed to his ungodly criminal ways. In a federal courtroom yesterday, after a jury had been selected to hear his case, Sizer admitted responsibility for sales of more than 20 guns with obliterated serial numbers.
NEWS
May 29, 1988 | Special to The Inquirer / IRA D. JOFFE
Second graders at Prospect Park Elementary School recently took part in the Go Wild For Reading program in which they read books with their parents. To celebrate the completion of the program, the children dressed up as characters from the books they had read and paraded around the school. Here, Melissa Young is shown dressed as Flashy.
NEWS
November 24, 1991 | By Michelle R. Davis, Special to The Inquirer
There will soon be some additions to the hushed and scholarly rooms of the Villanova University Law Library. More than 7,400 law books will be added to library shelves to replace older books and complement the university's current collection. On Wednesday, Arco Chemical Co. in Newtown Square delivered the second batch of about 250 cartons of books that it donated to the law library. The used books come from Arco's legal annex and legal library. "We had a number of volumes not being regularly used," said Lynne Scammahorn, librarian at Arco.
NEWS
November 12, 1989 | By Judith Bower and Joyce Vottima Hellberg, Special to The Inquirer
It was a reader's delight at the 14th annual Baldwin School Book Fair held at the lower school in Bryn Mawr this week. Seventeen area authors and illustrators autographed and discussed their books with those who attended the four-day event that began last Sunday. Edward Claflin of St. David's, author of The Art of Winning, was enthusiastic about attending the fair. "I like to see people walking around with piles of new books in their hands," Claflin said. "It's a wonderful sight.
NEWS
June 8, 1986 | By Nancy Reuter, Special to The Inquirer
About 40 children's books dating from the early 20th century will be on display through June 29 at, appropiately enough, a library. The books are from the collection of Owen Cobb, 63, of Cherry Hill, who has been collecting them for 25 to 30 years. They are on display at the Camden County Library's Echelon Urban Center, on Laurel Road in Voorhees. Cobb has about 1,000 children's books, including a "main collection" of 600, and 400 more that he has "accumulated. " The books on display at the library are ones that he feels viewers will find familiar, such as some from the Hardy Boys and Tom Swift Senior series.
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