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Boomers

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BUSINESS
May 8, 2008 | By Janet Pinkerton FOR THE INQUIRER
Whether you're moving, remodeling or staying put, planning a retirement home is an opportunity to create a personal environment that takes into account your future accessibility, safety and financial needs. And, experts say, there is no reason to forget style. Accessibility concerns - whether because of aging or physical limitations - are part of Valarie Costanzo's practice as a real estate agent for Prudential Fox & Roach in Rittenhouse Square and Haddonfield. Costanzo, 57, began concentrating on the accessibility niche after she was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis two years ago. She began helping MS Society clients in search of affordable handicapped-modified housing.
NEWS
May 25, 2005 | By Joanne Harkins
Sixty years ago, when World War II ended, veterans were welcomed home with open arms by their parents and grandparents. In the early 1950s, the nation began the serious business of building homes, schools, roads, and water and sewer systems to serve them and their young families. The baby boomers, the children of the veterans, were the beneficiaries of their investments in the future. Yet 50 years later, we, the boomers, seem unwilling to continue their commitment to a better tomorrow.
NEWS
April 28, 1986
We respond to "Baby-boom retirement crisis feared" (April 11) by John McGregor of The Inquirer's Washington Bureau. In the year 2025, when half of the baby boomers have retired, the children of these 60-year-olds will be members of the Supreme Court. Keep in mind now that these justices will have grown up in an era when abortion was acceptable for financial reasons, or simply because it is a free choice. We are sure that one of those fine justices will declare euthanasia constitutional.
NEWS
January 8, 1988 | By David Boaz
After the 1984 election, it became a cliche among political experts to say that baby boomers - Americans who are now 23 to 41 years old - were conservative on economic issues and liberal on social issues. Thus both parties would face the challenge of appealing to a large group of voters who were not receptive to the traditional liberalism of the Democrats or the conservatism of the Republicans. More recently, a revisionist view has arisen. Many political observers say that the boomers aren't so different after all and that they don't seem to be voting as a bloc or gravitating to a particular candidate.
NEWS
November 28, 1992
There it was, in the New York Times, a photograph to bring a shiver to the bravest of the brave. Assembled for some do of the rich and worthless were Sean Ono Lennon, looking geeky; his mother, the dread Yoko; Jann Wenner, terrible-tempered publisher of Rolling Stone, the irrelevant but very profitable magazine; and Tina Brown, editor of the New Yorker and friend to Eurotrash and American Eurotrash wannabes. It was illustrating a think piece about baby boomers' reactions to the news that a baby boomer had been elected president.
BUSINESS
January 8, 1992 | by Jenice M. Armstrong, Daily News Staff Writer
If you're a senior citizen, you can expect discounts at movie theaters, restaurants or even some retail stores. But if you're a middle-aged person with a mortgage and a child in college and another one in braces, you get zilch out of the discount department. That's among the beefs of a national organization recently formed to help promote the interests of baby boomers. Yes, that's right, that trend-setting group of Americans who were born between 1946 and 1964 have formed their own advocacy group - the American Association of Boomers.
NEWS
March 26, 1996 | By Arthur Brodsky
In this, the first year that baby boomers will turn 50, it is not too soon to think about yet another major adjustment in the U.S. economy. Having spawned Dr. Spock, the construction of thousands of schools, rock 'n' roll, blue jeans and now stomach-acid inhibitors, the boomers will soon lift and enrich another industry: retirement communities in Florida. People don't just retire to neighborhoods down there, they retire to "adult communities," self-contained developments enclosed by walls with some common characteristics: Little guardhouses, minibuses to take the residents shopping and a few clubhouses; walls that, like much of the clothing people wear, come in pastel shades; a generic name, usually made up of three geographical elements, one of which is generally Florida-related, like "sand" or "coral" or "palm," and the others of more generic features, like "lake" or "ridge.
NEWS
July 15, 1993 | By Alissa Wolf, FOR THE INQUIRER
Remember the first time bell-bottoms were "in," when Mick Jagger - now a grandpa - was a young hellion, and dating wasn't dangerous? If so, you likely have little patience for smoky clubs and bars with paint- peeling music that cater to rowdy 21-year-olds. You're not alone. As the population gets older, club owners realize they need to provide alternative forms of entertainment in an effort to appeal to aging - but still hip (of course) - baby boomers. One place that has long attracted that crowd is the Dead Dog Saloon (39th Street and Landis Avenue, Sea Isle City; 609-263-1500)
NEWS
February 2, 1990 | By JAY A. MAITLIN
The onset of the new decade marks a significant, but easily overlooked, milestone for the youngest members of the best-known generation in history. Beginning last month, the baby boomers who were born during the turbulent '60s - the decade in which the youth culture regarded those over 30 with suspicion - began turning 30 themselves. Those of us at the tail end of the baby boom, born between 1960 and 1964, true children of the '60s, will, at last, grow into full-fledged adults. We have often heard that older boomers found reaching the age of 30 to be profoundly traumatic - the end of a youth that they thought would last forever.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 11, 2016 | By Kevin Riordan, Columnist
After nearly a quarter century as a Burlington County elementary schoolteacher, Patricia "Patt" Osborne was intent on reinventing herself. So in 2002 she blended her fledgling career as a life coach with her lifelong love of the outdoors to launch Boomer Chick Adventures. "I know what being outdoors does for me," Osborne, 63, says. "I hope to help people experience a similar feeling. I don't teach; I just facilitate. The transformation comes from Mother Nature. " A Haddon Township grandmother of four, Osborne annually organizes more than a dozen hiking, kayaking, and other recreational activities in the Pinelands and elsewhere for small groups of women, most of whom are over 50. During a typical year about 125 people, many of them regulars and a handful of male spouses, participate; most activities involve day trips, although the schedule ( www.boomerchickadventures.com )
BUSINESS
May 1, 2016 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Staff Writer
It's an age-old quandary: Keep working? Retire to baby-sit the grandkids? Take up a new career in retirement? These days, professional coaches are guiding baby boomers as they ponder their postretirement dreams and ambitions. Some people consult these coaches to find purpose through volunteering, hobbies, and second or third careers, just as they might consult financial advisers to take inventory of their 401(k) accounts. Others discover that they never wanted to stop working - or that can't afford to. Ambivalent about the whole idea?
BUSINESS
April 4, 2016 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Staff Writer
Older individuals are reinventing themselves by going back to the classroom. And in college-rich Philadelphia, they and their tuition dollars are welcome on campus. Some are like Howard Magen, a retired CPA who audits classes he loved during his original college days. Others are baby boomers facing retirement who want that longed-for degree before they run out of time, or to stay competitive in the workplace. Take Wanda Amaro, a human-resources executive who is earning her bachelor's degree at age 53. Many colleges offer low-fee or even free classes for seniors.
BUSINESS
March 28, 2016 | By Suzette Parmley, Staff Writer
Digitally savvy millennials are the top buyers of gift cards. Gen X shoppers lean toward gift cards from traditional department and grocery stores. And boomers value one-stop shopping. That's what a joint study by the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania and the global information firm NPD Group Inc. recently revealed. The findings give retailers and brand manufacturers useful intelligence on how to better connect with their existing customers and attract new ones, said Denise Dahlhoff, research director of the Jay H. Baker Retailing Center at Wharton, who worked with the NPD Group on the study.
BUSINESS
February 29, 2016
Behind Alicia Rainwater stood a statue of Abraham Lincoln. Before her sat 36 members of a group that also has historical heft: the 105-year-old Rotary Club of Philadelphia. As it does every Thursday at noon, the group had convened for lunch at the vaunted Union League of Philadelphia, a private club built in 1865 whose dress code prohibits jeans, T-shirts, and sneakers - the uniform of many millennials. Ironic, given that Rainwater, herself a millennial at 32, was there to provide insight on her generation, born between 1977 and 1995.
NEWS
December 27, 2015 | By Lisa Gillespie, KAISER HEALTH NEWS
After the last of the baby boomers become fully eligible for Medicare, the federal health program can expect significantly higher costs in 2030, because of the high number of beneficiaries and because many are expected to be significantly less healthy than previous generations. The typical Medicare beneficiary who is 65 or older then will more likely be obese, disabled, and suffering from chronic conditions such as heart disease and high blood pressure than those in 2010, according to a report by the University of Southern California Schaeffer Center for Health Policy and Economics.
REAL_ESTATE
November 23, 2014 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
Stair lifts are becoming a baby-boomer accessory, local remodelers say. Some homeowners are even designing around them so they will be able to stay in their houses as they age. Dennis D. Gehman, president of Gehman Design Remodeling in Harleysville, said the move to stair lifts "is directly connected to baby boomers coming of retirement age. Ten thousand a day are turning 65, and many of them want to stay in their homes for financial reasons....
NEWS
November 21, 2014 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
I HAVE A POSTER hanging in my house advertising a panel discussion at my old newspaper. The title of the panel? "Twenty-somethings Tell Us Why The Paper Sucks. " When I pass by that poster these days, I mostly wonder one thing: "How did no one slap the smug snot out of us?" But the other night, as I listened to a panel of millennials at an event that was part of Young Involved Philadelphia's State of Young Philly, I started to wonder - maybe reminisce is the word - about other things.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 2014 | BY CHUCK DARROW, Daily News Staff Writer darrowc@phillynews.com, 215-313-3134
LOOKING TO get into a growth industry? Two words: hoarding cleanup. "Grief and time is what causes hoarding," proclaimed Matt Paxton, during a recent visit to Philadelphia. "The elderly just happen to have more time. " And, one might argue, more reasons to grieve. "Not all old people hoard . . . but the issue is, the population [of elderly] is getting ready to triple. In 30 years, 35 percent of the country will be over 65. We're gonna have more hoarders. "In 20 years, I'm gonna have a bunch of Beanie Baby hoarders.
REAL_ESTATE
April 6, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
My dislike for surveys is matched only by my distaste for pigeonholing segments of the population based on the results of those surveys. The latter can have unforeseen consequences, as I discovered more than a decade ago, when I began writing about baby boomers and over-55 housing preferences. During a long weekend of seminars in Scottsdale, Ariz., I listened to speaker after speaker pigeonhole baby boomers as wealthy, healthy, and wise, all eager to spend their money on amenity-rich over-55 housing the next day. I am, of course, a baby boomer.
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