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Boomers

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BUSINESS
May 8, 2008 | By Janet Pinkerton FOR THE INQUIRER
Whether you're moving, remodeling or staying put, planning a retirement home is an opportunity to create a personal environment that takes into account your future accessibility, safety and financial needs. And, experts say, there is no reason to forget style. Accessibility concerns - whether because of aging or physical limitations - are part of Valarie Costanzo's practice as a real estate agent for Prudential Fox & Roach in Rittenhouse Square and Haddonfield. Costanzo, 57, began concentrating on the accessibility niche after she was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis two years ago. She began helping MS Society clients in search of affordable handicapped-modified housing.
NEWS
May 25, 2005 | By Joanne Harkins
Sixty years ago, when World War II ended, veterans were welcomed home with open arms by their parents and grandparents. In the early 1950s, the nation began the serious business of building homes, schools, roads, and water and sewer systems to serve them and their young families. The baby boomers, the children of the veterans, were the beneficiaries of their investments in the future. Yet 50 years later, we, the boomers, seem unwilling to continue their commitment to a better tomorrow.
NEWS
April 28, 1986
We respond to "Baby-boom retirement crisis feared" (April 11) by John McGregor of The Inquirer's Washington Bureau. In the year 2025, when half of the baby boomers have retired, the children of these 60-year-olds will be members of the Supreme Court. Keep in mind now that these justices will have grown up in an era when abortion was acceptable for financial reasons, or simply because it is a free choice. We are sure that one of those fine justices will declare euthanasia constitutional.
NEWS
January 8, 1988 | By David Boaz
After the 1984 election, it became a cliche among political experts to say that baby boomers - Americans who are now 23 to 41 years old - were conservative on economic issues and liberal on social issues. Thus both parties would face the challenge of appealing to a large group of voters who were not receptive to the traditional liberalism of the Democrats or the conservatism of the Republicans. More recently, a revisionist view has arisen. Many political observers say that the boomers aren't so different after all and that they don't seem to be voting as a bloc or gravitating to a particular candidate.
NEWS
November 28, 1992
There it was, in the New York Times, a photograph to bring a shiver to the bravest of the brave. Assembled for some do of the rich and worthless were Sean Ono Lennon, looking geeky; his mother, the dread Yoko; Jann Wenner, terrible-tempered publisher of Rolling Stone, the irrelevant but very profitable magazine; and Tina Brown, editor of the New Yorker and friend to Eurotrash and American Eurotrash wannabes. It was illustrating a think piece about baby boomers' reactions to the news that a baby boomer had been elected president.
BUSINESS
January 8, 1992 | by Jenice M. Armstrong, Daily News Staff Writer
If you're a senior citizen, you can expect discounts at movie theaters, restaurants or even some retail stores. But if you're a middle-aged person with a mortgage and a child in college and another one in braces, you get zilch out of the discount department. That's among the beefs of a national organization recently formed to help promote the interests of baby boomers. Yes, that's right, that trend-setting group of Americans who were born between 1946 and 1964 have formed their own advocacy group - the American Association of Boomers.
NEWS
March 26, 1996 | By Arthur Brodsky
In this, the first year that baby boomers will turn 50, it is not too soon to think about yet another major adjustment in the U.S. economy. Having spawned Dr. Spock, the construction of thousands of schools, rock 'n' roll, blue jeans and now stomach-acid inhibitors, the boomers will soon lift and enrich another industry: retirement communities in Florida. People don't just retire to neighborhoods down there, they retire to "adult communities," self-contained developments enclosed by walls with some common characteristics: Little guardhouses, minibuses to take the residents shopping and a few clubhouses; walls that, like much of the clothing people wear, come in pastel shades; a generic name, usually made up of three geographical elements, one of which is generally Florida-related, like "sand" or "coral" or "palm," and the others of more generic features, like "lake" or "ridge.
NEWS
July 15, 1993 | By Alissa Wolf, FOR THE INQUIRER
Remember the first time bell-bottoms were "in," when Mick Jagger - now a grandpa - was a young hellion, and dating wasn't dangerous? If so, you likely have little patience for smoky clubs and bars with paint- peeling music that cater to rowdy 21-year-olds. You're not alone. As the population gets older, club owners realize they need to provide alternative forms of entertainment in an effort to appeal to aging - but still hip (of course) - baby boomers. One place that has long attracted that crowd is the Dead Dog Saloon (39th Street and Landis Avenue, Sea Isle City; 609-263-1500)
NEWS
February 2, 1990 | By JAY A. MAITLIN
The onset of the new decade marks a significant, but easily overlooked, milestone for the youngest members of the best-known generation in history. Beginning last month, the baby boomers who were born during the turbulent '60s - the decade in which the youth culture regarded those over 30 with suspicion - began turning 30 themselves. Those of us at the tail end of the baby boom, born between 1960 and 1964, true children of the '60s, will, at last, grow into full-fledged adults. We have often heard that older boomers found reaching the age of 30 to be profoundly traumatic - the end of a youth that they thought would last forever.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 27, 2015 | By Lisa Gillespie, KAISER HEALTH NEWS
After the last of the baby boomers become fully eligible for Medicare, the federal health program can expect significantly higher costs in 2030, because of the high number of beneficiaries and because many are expected to be significantly less healthy than previous generations. The typical Medicare beneficiary who is 65 or older then will more likely be obese, disabled, and suffering from chronic conditions such as heart disease and high blood pressure than those in 2010, according to a report by the University of Southern California Schaeffer Center for Health Policy and Economics.
REAL_ESTATE
November 23, 2014 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
Stair lifts are becoming a baby-boomer accessory, local remodelers say. Some homeowners are even designing around them so they will be able to stay in their houses as they age. Dennis D. Gehman, president of Gehman Design Remodeling in Harleysville, said the move to stair lifts "is directly connected to baby boomers coming of retirement age. Ten thousand a day are turning 65, and many of them want to stay in their homes for financial reasons....
NEWS
November 21, 2014 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
I HAVE A POSTER hanging in my house advertising a panel discussion at my old newspaper. The title of the panel? "Twenty-somethings Tell Us Why The Paper Sucks. " When I pass by that poster these days, I mostly wonder one thing: "How did no one slap the smug snot out of us?" But the other night, as I listened to a panel of millennials at an event that was part of Young Involved Philadelphia's State of Young Philly, I started to wonder - maybe reminisce is the word - about other things.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 2014 | BY CHUCK DARROW, Daily News Staff Writer darrowc@phillynews.com, 215-313-3134
LOOKING TO get into a growth industry? Two words: hoarding cleanup. "Grief and time is what causes hoarding," proclaimed Matt Paxton, during a recent visit to Philadelphia. "The elderly just happen to have more time. " And, one might argue, more reasons to grieve. "Not all old people hoard . . . but the issue is, the population [of elderly] is getting ready to triple. In 30 years, 35 percent of the country will be over 65. We're gonna have more hoarders. "In 20 years, I'm gonna have a bunch of Beanie Baby hoarders.
REAL_ESTATE
April 6, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
My dislike for surveys is matched only by my distaste for pigeonholing segments of the population based on the results of those surveys. The latter can have unforeseen consequences, as I discovered more than a decade ago, when I began writing about baby boomers and over-55 housing preferences. During a long weekend of seminars in Scottsdale, Ariz., I listened to speaker after speaker pigeonhole baby boomers as wealthy, healthy, and wise, all eager to spend their money on amenity-rich over-55 housing the next day. I am, of course, a baby boomer.
NEWS
March 19, 2014
IT'S NO SECRET that many members of the so-called millennial generation are struggling financially. They may be the first cohort to end up worse off than their parents. The sheer number of millennials - about 80 million - makes them a significant force in the U.S. economy. But many of them have trouble accurately answering basic personal-finance questions, spend more than they make and are worried about their debt, according to a new survey by the Investor Education Foundation of the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority.
BUSINESS
January 28, 2014 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
Take heart, all you baby boomers who have let the years pass without a commitment to toning your abs and thighs or challenging your cardiovascular system. In a Montgomery County office park, a small band of product developers at Smooth Fitness L.L.C. has your back. Your glutes, too, and anything else on your aging frame that might need some help. "It's not because I'm 54," said Rich Hebert, the 6-foot-3, 195-pound CEO of the King of Prussia exercise-equipment company that trades as Smooth Fitness & Health.
BUSINESS
December 13, 2013 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
Two retired Philadelphia professors - Barbara Fleisher and Thelma Reese - are riding the growing wave of women over 60, one of the fastest-growing demographics in America. Not only are 10,000 baby boomers retiring every day, but many female boomers outlive their husbands, as do women in general. "If you are part of this growing group of women over 60, what can we do about using this time well? There aren't any role models. My mother lived to be just short of 97, but she never wore slacks.
SPORTS
September 26, 2013 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
HALL OF FAME linebacker Lawrence Taylor hasn't played since 1993. But he's still going after quarterbacks. Taylor is the subject of a Showtime documentary titled "LT: The Life & Times," which premiered Friday. In the film, former QB Boomer Esiason was critical of Taylor, saying the 10-time Pro Bowler, who spent his entire 13-year career with the Giants, was given preferential treatment by the team and then-coach Bill Parcells. It's nothing Esiason hasn't said before, but LT took exception to Boomer being included in the documentary.
NEWS
June 23, 2013 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Martin Bayne doesn't so much sit in his wheelchair as he sprawls in it. He looks like he might slip out at any moment. He is obese - a consequence of so many diseases, medications, and limitations. His world is so small now, a room and occasionally the hallways of a personal-care home near Allentown. It is from this isolated existence that Bayne, 63, has reached out to an enormous audience in the last year. He has had an essay published in Health Affairs, a leading health-care journal, and has been interviewed by the New York Times and by Terry Gross on her NPR radio show, Fresh Air. Bayne sees himself as a "clarion" for aging baby boomers.
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