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Boomers

NEWS
December 9, 1992 | BY MIKE ROYKO
The sobbing came from the next booth. Glancing over, I saw an attractive couple, tears streaming down their cheeks and dripping on their veggie lunch plates. And I spotted the source of their grief. On the table was Newsweek, with a cover story revealing the shocking news that baby boomers have reached or are approaching middle age. "It's so cruel and unfair," the woman gasped. "Yes," said the man, "I don't know if I can cope. " Then they saw me staring and the woman shrieked: "Look, it is an old person, an ancient.
NEWS
June 29, 2012 | By Anndee Hochman, For The Inquirer
For Kathy Tench, a 64-year-old Philadelphia charter schoolteacher, anxiety is the voice that comes nattering in the middle of the night. It might start with a stray thought after waking up to use the bathroom - "Why was I left out of that e-mail loop at work?" - and ramp up to a spiral of worry: Maybe they don't value my input. Maybe I'll be pink-slipped in the next round of budget cuts. Then how will I pay the mortgage? What if I can't retire at 70, as I plan? She sometimes lies there, obsessing, until dawn.
NEWS
December 20, 2007 | By Jeff Gammage INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If you're over 50, you've probably had this experience: You're standing at a checkout counter, ready to pay, and the twentysomething behind the register is talking on her cell phone. So you wait, and wait, and wait, and when the clerk finally finishes her conversation, she offers not an apology, but a grimace that suggests you've interrupted. Sound familiar? It has a name: the Service Gap. That's not a hip clothing store for soldiers. Or a new motto for the London subway system.
NEWS
July 14, 2011 | By Connie Cass and Stacy A. Anderson, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Baby boomers say wrinkles aren't so bad and they're not that worried about dying. Just don't call them old. The generation that once powered a youth movement isn't ready to symbolize the aging of America, even as its first members are becoming eligible for Medicare. A new poll finds three-quarters of all baby boomers still consider themselves middle-aged or younger. That includes most of the boomers who are ages 57 to 65. Younger adults call 60 the start of old age, but baby boomers are pushing that number back, according to the Associated Press-LifeGoesStrong.com poll.
NEWS
July 31, 2011 | Jennifer C. Kerr, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The "golden years" may lose some luster for many baby boomers worried about the financial pressures that come with age. Many of the nation's 77 million boomers are worried about being able to pay their medical bills as they get older, a new poll finds. The concern is so deep that it outpaces worries about facing a major illness or disease, dying, or losing the ability to do favorite activities. Another major concern among the boomers: losing their financial independence.
NEWS
June 3, 1998 | By Michael Vitez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's time to retire the notion of retirement. A whopping 80 percent of baby boomers say they plan to work long after traditional retirement age - one-third because they want to, but nearly one-quarter because they will need the money. In contrast, 12 percent of Americans 65 and over are working full or part time today. "Retirement for boomers, it seems, will not be retirement at all," said Edward B. Keller, president of Roper Starch Worldwide, which conducted a survey of 2,000 members of the boomer generation, born between 1946 and 1964 and now age 33 to 52. The survey was commissioned by the American Association for Retired Persons - or AARP, as it prefers to be called.
BUSINESS
January 28, 2014 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
Take heart, all you baby boomers who have let the years pass without a commitment to toning your abs and thighs or challenging your cardiovascular system. In a Montgomery County office park, a small band of product developers at Smooth Fitness L.L.C. has your back. Your glutes, too, and anything else on your aging frame that might need some help. "It's not because I'm 54," said Rich Hebert, the 6-foot-3, 195-pound CEO of the King of Prussia exercise-equipment company that trades as Smooth Fitness & Health.
REAL_ESTATE
January 23, 2011 | By Al Heavens, Inquirer Columnist
A lot of home builders once assumed there would be a bottomless market of baby boomers for their over-55 communities. You could see the dollar signs in their eyes every time they happened on one of the 79 million Americans born between 1945 and 1964. Demographers admonished them not to lump all boomers together, noting that a large segment hadn't gone to Ivy League schools or become corporate lawyers. Some, it turns out, actually worked for a living, or didn't, or lived from paycheck to paycheck, or saw their high-paying jobs outsourced to cheap labor markets and now were working at fast-food outlets.
NEWS
April 18, 1995 | by Randolph Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Is your vision of retirement reality or fantasy? Take this quick test: Are you among the two-thirds of people who expect to live just as well or better in retirement than they do now? In other words, no plans to cut back after you quit working? Are you among the one in two people who counts on having enough money to retire before age 65? Don't kid yourself. You may dream of luxury cruises and wintering in Florida. Reality is more likely to mean grim downsizing - a no-frills existence or working into your 70s, your golden-years fantasy shattered because you didn't save.
NEWS
September 20, 2009 | By Lini S. Kadaba INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bob Willette clocks 110 miles each week on his road-racing bike, mostly while he commutes the 26-mile round trip to work. He also whacks tennis balls with his doubles group. And he pushes himself in a regular hoops game, where "something's always twisted or stubbed. Or bleeding," he said. The trim North Coventry scientist is 53 years old. As with many baby boomers, his physical regimen comes at a price - upper-back pain, tendinitis, and various aches. At least once a year, he said, his body "breaks down," forcing a doctor visit for a round of anti-inflammatories.
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