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Boomers

NEWS
June 28, 2012 | By Terri Akman and FOR THE INQUIRER
When Bob Hanks died unexpectedly in August 2009 at 56, his wife, Rita, wanted to celebrate his life.   He had lived fully, and loved to have a good time, said Rita of her husband, who suffered organ failure after getting dehydrated. What else could she do to honor this free spirit than give him a Jimmy Buffett-themed funeral? So the Willingboro man's obituary invited guests to, as Buffett might say, "Come as you are. " "People came in Hawaiian shirts and one girl even came in a bikini," recalled Rita.
NEWS
June 16, 2012 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Michael Secreto has no idea where he picked up hepatitis C. Tattoos made with India ink and needles passed among 12-year-old friends in South Philly? Hard drugs as a teenager? Blood from dialysis patients when he drove paratransit vehicles in the 1990s? The infection was a surprise, discovered after Secreto's wife heard about hepatitis and suggested he get tested a decade ago. Back then, the treatment didn't work for him. Now, midway through a new drug regimen, the virus is down to undetectable levels.
BUSINESS
May 20, 2012 | By Alan J. Heavens, INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
In the first few years of the last decade, a lot of assumptions were made about aging baby boomers, their parents, their children, and their housing needs. Boomers would begin downsizing as soon as the children flew the coop, starting at about 55. Boomers would move to communities filled with their own kind. Elderly parents would be accommodated in a casita — a part of the house — until they needed continuing care. The casita would then be converted to a crafts room.
NEWS
May 19, 2012 | By David Brown, Washington Post
The federal government Friday called for all baby boomers to be tested for hepatitis C, which kills more Americans each year than AIDS and is the leading reason for liver transplants. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention made the recommendation to find hundreds of thousands of people who don't realize that they have the infection, which greatly increases their chances of developing cirrhosis and liver cancer. The hepatitis C virus is transmitted by blood, usually through intravenous drug use or transfusions.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2012 | Dear Abby
DEAR ABBY: "Searching for ‘Me' in Texas" is not alone! A wave of 78 million baby boomers will soon leave 30-plus-year careers and are looking forward to an estimated 20 more years of life. A vast majority of them are looking for meaningful opportunities for the second half of their lives. "Searching" should seek out a nonprofit organization for a cause she's passionate about and offer her skilled services. If "Searching" doesn't need an income, she can volunteer. Finally, instead of seeking a graduate degree, she could look at her local community college and find noncredit classes that interest her and participate without the pressure of credited course work.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2012 | By David Hiltbrand, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jen Lancaster is up on her high horse again. Fans of the witty memoirist are delighted to see her back in the saddle. Her just-published book, Jeneration X (NAL, $25.95) is a plea for her contemporaries to stand apart from the willfully infantile generations that bracket them -- the boomers and the millenials -- by acting like adults. "We're differentiating ourselves by becoming the only grownups in the room," says Lancaster. "We're tired of seeing all these baby boomers running around talking about their feelings and these Gen Y kids that you have to constantly coddle or they'll have a meltdown.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 2011 | By Ana Veciana-Suarez, Miami Herald
Baby boomer women might not want to wear their daughters' jeans and men may refuse to don muscle shirts, but the generation that brought us tie-dye still wants to remain fashionable and hip well into middle age. How to monetize that desire is both a marketer's conundrum and dream. "Even with mature figures, boomers want to have fashionable options," says Roseanne Morrison, fashion director for the Doneger Group, an industry consultant. "That doesn't stop just because you hit a certain age. " The problem is, designers and retailers often don't know how to reach a demographic that is varied, numerous, and affluent.
NEWS
November 27, 2011
Nicole Gelinas is a City Journal contributing editor and a fellow at the Manhattan Institute Aging members of America's middle class worry about retirement, and for good reason. When the TV talking heads aren't reminding us about plummeting house prices, they're speculating about not whether but by how much politicians will cut Social Security and Medicare benefits. And the financial and economic crises of the last several years have left the country 10 percent poorer, obliterating $6.1 trillion in wealth, a healthy chunk of which was in retirement savings.
BUSINESS
November 20, 2011 | By Mark Jewell, Associated Press
Baby boomers fully embraced the stock market by riding its ups and downs throughout their peak income years. But now that the oldest boomers are turning 65, their focus has turned toward ensuring a steady income from their investments. And they're likely to find the answer is to put money in bonds rather than stocks, as recent market volatility shows. Broadly diversified bond mutual funds have provided investors an average annualized return of nearly 5.6 percent over the last five years.
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