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Bordeaux

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NEWS
April 29, 2013
Bordeaux almost always refers to a red blend. But the dry whites of Bordeaux are underappreciated, especially those from Graves. So I was intrigued by this elegant California homage to the style from Napa's Chimney Rock. This Stag's Leap district star, known for pricey cabs, blends sauvignon blanc with sauvignon gris, a pink-skinned grape that adds an unusual texture to the wine. Most popular sauvignons these days are almost garishly bright. But this one, while still aromatic with lemon, apple and tropical notes, is softened and enriched by the gris, which adds opulent weight to the wine as well as a complex, savory finish.
FOOD
May 10, 1987 | By Deborah Scoblionkov, Special to The Inquirer
They met by chance on a beach in Hawaii. Although they came from different cultures, they quickly discovered they had a lot in common. Both, for example, were great lovers of wine. In fact, each had his own winery, Robert Mondavi's in California and the Baron Philippe de Rothschild's in Bordeaux. If they joined forces, if they conspired, they could make beautiful wine together. Rothschild, who once complained that "California wines are like Coca-Cola; they all taste the same," had apparently changed his mind.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 1989 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
It is practically an axiom of the modern detective story that a policeman's lot is not a happy one. But what if it's a gay one? This intriguing proposition is at the cold heart of Yannick Bellon's La Triche, a juicy film noir that keynotes the opening day of the American Gay Film Tour at the Roxy Screening Rooms. La Triche is the kind of movie whose easy sophistication mocks Hollywood's nervous and tentative treatment of homosexuality. The measure of the difference can be found in comparing Bellon's film to Making Love, Arthur Hiller's gingerly attempt to chronicle the problems of a doctor who leaves his wife for another man. In La Triche, which is set in seedy Bordeaux and practically sighs with world-weariness, much the same situation arises.
NEWS
August 1, 1993 | By Janet Poland, FOR THE INQUIRER
I am in the center of the world of wine, and I am intoxicated. Oh, the wine is great. But it's not the wine. What makes my heart sing and my head spin is, rather, the sense of time that springs from this ancient region of southwestern France, the awareness of earlier streets beneath these stones, of a past that sinks down beneath the gritty limestone soil. Under different names and different rulers, Bordeaux has prospered here on a graceful bend in the Garonne River for more than 2,000 years.
NEWS
June 4, 2000 | By Andrea Knox, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
I didn't come to Bordeaux looking for Eleanor of Aquitaine. My youthful infatuation with this best-known of medieval queens had been gathering dust in my mental attic, so it was my past as well as hers that came back to haunt me when I found myself walking in her traces on a long weekend in this ancient city. Suddenly there she was, in spirit at least, entering the city through gates in walls whose shadows still linger, wending her way through streets that retain their tangled medieval courses if not their 12th-century houses, and stopping before the Cathedral of St. Andre to arrange her skirts, headdress, and entourage before entering the church to be married - not once but twice, the second time a match with the future Henry II of England that would change the destinies of England and Aquitaine, Eleanor's possession in southwestern France.
SPORTS
April 20, 1990 | By Mayer Brandschain, Special to The Inquirer
A team of men and women tennis players from Bordeaux, France, concluded their four-match tour in the United States by defeating Philadelphia, 4-1, yesterday in a doubles competition at the Racquet Club. Before arriving in Philadelphia, the French team had played matches in Boston; Newport, R.I.; Tuxedo, N.Y., and New York City. The French squad clinched the match when its women's pair of Anne Ryman and Jeannette Guardia defeated Philadelphians Mac Ryan and Kaitlin Curran, 6-2, 6-1, for a 3-1 lead.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 2000 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Among the many portraits of artists attempted by filmmakers, precious few manage more than a superficial and sometimes far-fetched connection between the life and the work it shaped. Carlos Saura has long dreamed of making a film about Francisco Goya and over the years it took to bring Goya in Bordeaux to the screen, he clearly gave much thought to convincingly linking the painter's incomparable legacy to the events that defined his development. His approach is unique and boldly conceived.
NEWS
April 10, 2015
BU ZZ: Hey Marnie, what's the meaning behind all the different shapes of wine bottles? Marnie: Interesting question, Buzz. The vast majority of wines come in one of four classic bottle shapes. Each one traces its roots to one of the world's most famous wine regions. Buzz: OK, give me a lesson. Marnie: Bordeaux-style bottles, which are the most common, are narrow, cylindrical and high-shouldered. Burgundy-style bottles are wider with long, sloped shoulders, and most often used for chardonnay, pinot noir and Rhone blends.
NEWS
April 24, 1991 | By Marc Schogol Compiled from reports from Inquirer wire services
CAMPUS KUDOS Get out the noisemakers and confetti. The University of Pennsylvania is rated as having the third best business school, the sixth best medical school and the 10th best law school in U.S. News & World Report's annual survey of the nation's graduate schools. Penn State and Princeton are said to have the 12th and 17th best engineering schools, respectively, and Thomas Jefferson University is rated as the third best medical school whose main mission is primary care. A HELPING HAND Forget the flowers and candy; let your secretary take hourly breaks from VDT keyboarding today - National Secretaries Day - and every day. "Work-rest cycling" could prevent the onset of carpal tunnel syndrome, a potentially crippling hand disorder, says the American Physical Therapy Association.
NEWS
October 27, 1987 | By Andy Rooney
Everyone has to be careful about being sentimental about the nonexistent "good old days" because the days of our lives are good and bad like a roller coaster. Still, it's hard not to recall with affection some of the inanimate objects we've lived with and liked. Some of them last and some of them are replaced by newer models. Sometimes we never know what happens to them. It seems as though just when a company begins to get it right with whatever it's making, it either goes out of business, moves or decides to change the product.
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NEWS
April 10, 2015
BU ZZ: Hey Marnie, what's the meaning behind all the different shapes of wine bottles? Marnie: Interesting question, Buzz. The vast majority of wines come in one of four classic bottle shapes. Each one traces its roots to one of the world's most famous wine regions. Buzz: OK, give me a lesson. Marnie: Bordeaux-style bottles, which are the most common, are narrow, cylindrical and high-shouldered. Burgundy-style bottles are wider with long, sloped shoulders, and most often used for chardonnay, pinot noir and Rhone blends.
TRAVEL
March 10, 2014 | By Amy Laughinghouse, For The Inquirer
ABOARD THE CRYSTAL SERENITY - I'm sitting beside a pool in the Bay of Biscay, sipping a gin and tonic as a Thai band plays a vigorous rendition of Van Halen's "Jump. " A life-sized Barbie in a black-fringed thong bikini has just lowered herself into the water, no doubt inducing heart palpitations and several cases of whiplash among the men relaxing on the Lido Deck around me. That might seem to be sufficient excitement for one afternoon, but all eyes are directed upward when a crimson helicopter appears overhead, dangling two black-clad men from cables.
NEWS
April 29, 2013
Bordeaux almost always refers to a red blend. But the dry whites of Bordeaux are underappreciated, especially those from Graves. So I was intrigued by this elegant California homage to the style from Napa's Chimney Rock. This Stag's Leap district star, known for pricey cabs, blends sauvignon blanc with sauvignon gris, a pink-skinned grape that adds an unusual texture to the wine. Most popular sauvignons these days are almost garishly bright. But this one, while still aromatic with lemon, apple and tropical notes, is softened and enriched by the gris, which adds opulent weight to the wine as well as a complex, savory finish.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 2012
BUZZ: WHEN did they start making wine with chile peppers, Marnie? Marnie: I think you may have your wires crossed, Buzz. Where did you hear that? Buzz : I read it right on the label of the wine my buddy brought over last night. It said "Chile. " My gut can't handle spicy stuff the way it used to, so I didn't open it. Marnie: Oh. No need to worry. That's not "chile wine"; it's wine from Chile in South America. Buzz: Red wine from South America?
NEWS
March 6, 2005 | By Beth Gillin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ours is a culture that derides diplomats. On crime dramas, their immunity lets them get away with murder. On Saturday Night Live, they're pompous twits. Lower-level members of the diplomatic corps, such as Philadelphia's crop of six consuls general and 29 honorary consuls (including representatives from Madagascar and Moldova) are pretty much ignored - except by those who need help getting out of jail, or shipping a body home. That is, until royalty visits, or a dignitary comes to call.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 2000 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Among the many portraits of artists attempted by filmmakers, precious few manage more than a superficial and sometimes far-fetched connection between the life and the work it shaped. Carlos Saura has long dreamed of making a film about Francisco Goya and over the years it took to bring Goya in Bordeaux to the screen, he clearly gave much thought to convincingly linking the painter's incomparable legacy to the events that defined his development. His approach is unique and boldly conceived.
FOOD
August 9, 2000 | by Lynn Hoffman, For the Daily News
Vines work hard in the summer. The leaves are busy turning sunshine into the sugar that will eventually ferment and become alcohol. The roots, meanwhile, are creating the flavors that make wines taste different from each other and different from any old alcohol-fortified beverage. What makes winemakers nuts is that these two processes don't always work in tandem. Sometimes a hot, sunny summer will have the grapes at their maximum sugar level too early, before the flavor has a chance to develop further.
FOOD
June 7, 2000 | by Lynn Hoffman, For the Daily News
Yeah, but is it wine? I'm enjoying a glass of Bordeaux with my friend the chef. Actually, enjoying is too frivolous a word. He is silent, eyes closed, leaning back in his chair, lower lip pulled in, head tilted slightly back to heaven. I am gaping off into the distance while the flavors bounce around from my tongue to my brain. The wine has layers and layers of taste and aroma. Deep and rich, it goes on forever. My wife walks by. She has seen this tableau before, so she doesn't bother to check either of us for a pulse.
NEWS
June 4, 2000 | By Andrea Knox, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
I didn't come to Bordeaux looking for Eleanor of Aquitaine. My youthful infatuation with this best-known of medieval queens had been gathering dust in my mental attic, so it was my past as well as hers that came back to haunt me when I found myself walking in her traces on a long weekend in this ancient city. Suddenly there she was, in spirit at least, entering the city through gates in walls whose shadows still linger, wending her way through streets that retain their tangled medieval courses if not their 12th-century houses, and stopping before the Cathedral of St. Andre to arrange her skirts, headdress, and entourage before entering the church to be married - not once but twice, the second time a match with the future Henry II of England that would change the destinies of England and Aquitaine, Eleanor's possession in southwestern France.
NEWS
April 6, 1997 | By Joseph S. Kennedy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Fine wines from the banks of the Schuylkill? Today, that sounds far-fetched. Yet back when the republic was new, Peter Legeaux, a French nobleman-turned-American entrepreneur, convinced wealthy backers, the General Assembly and the governor that American wine production could begin in this region. He, of course, was wrong. Legeaux apparently was born in the province of Lorraine in 1748, according to records of the Historical Society of Montgomery County. His family was a noble one, with connections to the royal court.
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