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Border Fence

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NEWS
February 19, 2012 | By Christopher Sherman, Associated Press
BROWNSVILLE, Texas - Max Pons is already anticipating the anxiety he'll feel when the heavy steel gate shuts behind him, leaving his home isolated on a strip of land between America's border fence and the violence raging across the Rio Grande in Mexico. For the last year, the manager of a sprawling preserve on the southern tip of Texas has been comforted by a gap in the rust-colored fence that gave him a quick escape route north in case of emergency. Now the U.S. government is installing the first gates to fill in this part of the fence along the Southwest border, and Pons admits he's pondering drastic scenarios.
NEWS
April 18, 2006 | By John M. Templeton Jr
President Bush blames Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid (D., Nev.), and Reid blames Majority Leader Bill Frist (R., Tenn.), for the collapse of the hastily arranged immigration compromise bill. Hopefully, the two-week Senate recess provided a cooling-off period. Months of posturing and pandering have not produced what America needs: a workable solution to the illegal-immigration crisis that is both just and fair. The two opposing sides - those who would prefer a bill consisting primarily of border-security measures and those who would prefer something that resembles amnesty - must now put the best interests of the nation above their self- interests as sparring politicians.
NEWS
December 4, 2005 | By Jan C. Ting
Tonight, more than four years after 9/11, thousands of foreigners will covertly enter the United States. This will happen again tomorrow night, and the night after, and every night of the year, until we take the simple step of erecting an effective border fence. U.S. Border Patrol apprehensions increased significantly in 2004 and 2005, though only a small fraction of foreigners attempting illegal entry are ever caught. Most enter without detection, at least 1 million every year.
NEWS
March 14, 2007 | Daily News wire services
American infantry troopers press fight outside Baghdad BAQOUBA, Iraq - About 700 American soldiers rolled into Baqouba yesterday, shifted out of Baghdad to help carry the security campaign against sectarian violence to a nearby volatile province where Sunni Arab insurgents fled ahead of the crackdown in the capital. The fresh troops from the Army's 5th Battalion, 20th Infantry Regiment - equipped with Stryker armored vehicles - joined 3,500 U.S. and 20,000 Iraqi soldiers already in Diyala province, where insurgents have stepped up attacks as violence appears to be ebbing in Baghdad.
NEWS
August 24, 1990 | Daily News Wire Services
Some 30,000 Lithuanians, carrying national flags and singing patriotic songs, massed at the border with Poland yesterday to denounce control of the frontier by the KGB. The protesters, calling for control to be assumed by Lithuania's separatist government, crowded in pouring rain against a border fence set in a birch and pine forest. Troops backed by armored cars formed a barrier about 50 yards along the tarmac border strip to guard against any attempts to break through. Organizers had planned to stage a mass border crossing to mark the 51st anniversary of the Nazi-Soviet pact which led to the incorporation of all three independent Baltic republics into the Soviet Union.
NEWS
May 3, 2010 | By David A. Ridenour
If President Obama puts immigration reform at the top of his priority list, Congress should muster the courage to stop him. Obama risks slicing the number of Americans who trust the federal government from the already dismal 22 percent - as determined by a Pew Research poll - to something approaching negative numbers. And for good reason, because our federal immigration policy is not only broken; it's hypocritical. The president's idea of immigration reform is legalizing the immigration status of those who entered the United States illegally - after they pay a fine and endure other inconveniences - while lessening border enforcement.
NEWS
January 26, 1989 | By R.A. Zaldivar, Inquirer Washington Bureau Inquirer wire services contributed to this article
A national immigration control group is calling for 55 miles of hard-to- climb fences, 12-foot walls and concrete barriers along the Mexican border as part of a larger plan to hold off illegal aliens. "A border fence is not a Berlin Wall," the Federation for American Immigration Reform (FAIR) said in a report scheduled for release today. "The Berlin Wall is designed to keep East German citizens in who desperately want to get out. Locking uninvited gate crashers out, however, is just good common sense.
NEWS
June 19, 2011 | By Selcan Hacaoglu and Bassem Mroue, Associated Press
BOYNUYOGUN REFUGEE CAMP, Turkey - Syrian troops backed by tanks and firing heavy machine guns swept into a village near the Turkish border Saturday, forcing more people displaced by the crackdown on antigovernment protesters to flee across the frontier. The Local Coordination Committees, a group that documents protests, said troops backed by six tanks and several armored personnel carriers entered Bdama in the morning. The village, about 12 miles from the Turkish border, had a bakery that was the sole source of bread for nearly 2,000 displaced people crowded near the border who had hoped not to have to flee to the Turkish tent-city sanctuary.
NEWS
August 27, 2012
U.S. Taliban headed to court INDIANAPOLIS - An American-born Taliban fighter imprisoned in Indiana will try to convince a federal judge that his religious freedom trumps security concerns in a closely watched trial that will examine how far prisons can go to ensure security in the age of terrorism. John Walker Lindh was expected to testify Monday in Indianapolis during the first day of the trial over prayer policies in a tightly restricted prison unit where he and other high-risk inmates have severely limited contact with the outside world.
NEWS
July 10, 2013
The Border Patrol's forces have doubled over the past decade even as foiled attempts to cross the U.S.-Mexico border illegally have sunk to a 40-year low. So, with astonishing obliviousness to its purpose, the bloated agency has turned to the same mission impossible that has kept countless other American law enforcers busy to little avail: the war on drugs. Much of what the Border Patrol's 21,000 agents are doing these days has nothing to do with patrolling the border. A growing number of those arrested by the agency are not Mexicans trying to enter the United States illegally, but Americans carrying relatively modest amounts of marijuana and other drugs.
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NEWS
July 10, 2013
The Border Patrol's forces have doubled over the past decade even as foiled attempts to cross the U.S.-Mexico border illegally have sunk to a 40-year low. So, with astonishing obliviousness to its purpose, the bloated agency has turned to the same mission impossible that has kept countless other American law enforcers busy to little avail: the war on drugs. Much of what the Border Patrol's 21,000 agents are doing these days has nothing to do with patrolling the border. A growing number of those arrested by the agency are not Mexicans trying to enter the United States illegally, but Americans carrying relatively modest amounts of marijuana and other drugs.
NEWS
November 24, 2012 | By Karin Laub and Sarah El Deeb, Associated Press
  GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip - Israeli troops fired on Gazans surging toward Israel's border fence Friday, killing one person but leaving intact the two-day-old cease-fire between Hamas and the Jewish state. The truce, which calls for an end to Gaza rocket fire on Israel and Israeli air strikes on Gaza, came after eight days of cross-border fighting, the bloodiest between Israel and Hamas in four years. Hundreds of Palestinians approached the border fence Friday in several locations in southern Gaza, testing expectations that Israel would no longer enforce a 300-yard-wide no-go zone on the Palestinian side of the fence that was meant to prevent infiltrations into Israel.
NEWS
August 27, 2012
U.S. Taliban headed to court INDIANAPOLIS - An American-born Taliban fighter imprisoned in Indiana will try to convince a federal judge that his religious freedom trumps security concerns in a closely watched trial that will examine how far prisons can go to ensure security in the age of terrorism. John Walker Lindh was expected to testify Monday in Indianapolis during the first day of the trial over prayer policies in a tightly restricted prison unit where he and other high-risk inmates have severely limited contact with the outside world.
NEWS
February 19, 2012 | By Christopher Sherman, Associated Press
BROWNSVILLE, Texas - Max Pons is already anticipating the anxiety he'll feel when the heavy steel gate shuts behind him, leaving his home isolated on a strip of land between America's border fence and the violence raging across the Rio Grande in Mexico. For the last year, the manager of a sprawling preserve on the southern tip of Texas has been comforted by a gap in the rust-colored fence that gave him a quick escape route north in case of emergency. Now the U.S. government is installing the first gates to fill in this part of the fence along the Southwest border, and Pons admits he's pondering drastic scenarios.
NEWS
June 19, 2011 | By Selcan Hacaoglu and Bassem Mroue, Associated Press
BOYNUYOGUN REFUGEE CAMP, Turkey - Syrian troops backed by tanks and firing heavy machine guns swept into a village near the Turkish border Saturday, forcing more people displaced by the crackdown on antigovernment protesters to flee across the frontier. The Local Coordination Committees, a group that documents protests, said troops backed by six tanks and several armored personnel carriers entered Bdama in the morning. The village, about 12 miles from the Turkish border, had a bakery that was the sole source of bread for nearly 2,000 displaced people crowded near the border who had hoped not to have to flee to the Turkish tent-city sanctuary.
NEWS
May 3, 2010 | By David A. Ridenour
If President Obama puts immigration reform at the top of his priority list, Congress should muster the courage to stop him. Obama risks slicing the number of Americans who trust the federal government from the already dismal 22 percent - as determined by a Pew Research poll - to something approaching negative numbers. And for good reason, because our federal immigration policy is not only broken; it's hypocritical. The president's idea of immigration reform is legalizing the immigration status of those who entered the United States illegally - after they pay a fine and endure other inconveniences - while lessening border enforcement.
NEWS
June 24, 2008 | Daily News wire services
Justices OK with border fence WASHINGTON - The Bush administration's controversial fence along the Southwest border slipped through a potential roadblock yesterday as the Supreme Court rejected a constitutional challenge by environmental groups and more than a dozen members of Congress. Without comment, the justices refused to consider pleas that Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff had overstepped his constitutional authority by waiving laws and regulations to expedite construction of 670 miles of fencing along the U.S.-Mexico border.
NEWS
March 14, 2007 | Daily News wire services
American infantry troopers press fight outside Baghdad BAQOUBA, Iraq - About 700 American soldiers rolled into Baqouba yesterday, shifted out of Baghdad to help carry the security campaign against sectarian violence to a nearby volatile province where Sunni Arab insurgents fled ahead of the crackdown in the capital. The fresh troops from the Army's 5th Battalion, 20th Infantry Regiment - equipped with Stryker armored vehicles - joined 3,500 U.S. and 20,000 Iraqi soldiers already in Diyala province, where insurgents have stepped up attacks as violence appears to be ebbing in Baghdad.
NEWS
November 3, 2006 | By Jeff Shields INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Forget the elephants, the body bags, the bow tie, and the mariachi band. To truly appreciate the reality-TV campaign of Apprentice exile Raj Peter Bhakta, watch the five-minute video of the polo-shirted candidate chasing a half-naked man through the alleys of Brownsville, Texas. That would be 1,900 miles from the congressional district he hopes to represent in Northeast Philadelphia and Montgomery County. "There he is! Get him, get him!" Bhakta commands the cameraman as the sodden immigrant emerges from the U.S. side of the Rio Grande after a short swim from Mexico.
NEWS
April 18, 2006 | By John M. Templeton Jr
President Bush blames Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid (D., Nev.), and Reid blames Majority Leader Bill Frist (R., Tenn.), for the collapse of the hastily arranged immigration compromise bill. Hopefully, the two-week Senate recess provided a cooling-off period. Months of posturing and pandering have not produced what America needs: a workable solution to the illegal-immigration crisis that is both just and fair. The two opposing sides - those who would prefer a bill consisting primarily of border-security measures and those who would prefer something that resembles amnesty - must now put the best interests of the nation above their self- interests as sparring politicians.
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