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NEWS
May 18, 2006
SO WHERE'S the real hammer? Debate about immigration reform has intensified since President Bush announced his plan to send 6,000 National Guard troops to secure our borders with Mexico. But in all the talk about guarding the borders, "guest-worker" programs, ID cards, and undocumented immigrants learning English, a huge part of the equation has been left out - an all-out federal crackdown on employers and businesses that hire these workers. That's the ultimate hammer.
NEWS
October 30, 2011 | By Gene Johnson, Associated Press
SEATTLE - The U.S. Border Patrol has quietly stopped its practice of routinely searching buses, trains, and airports for illegal immigrants at transportation hubs along the northern border and in the nation's interior, preventing agents from using what had long been an effective tool for tracking down people here illegally, the Associated Press has learned. Current and former Border Patrol agents said field offices around the country began receiving the order last month - soon after the Obama administration announced that to ease an overburdened immigration system, it would allow many undocumented people to remain in the country while it focuses on deporting those who have committed crimes.
NEWS
January 18, 2012 | By Elliot Spagat, Associated Press
SAN DIEGO - The U.S. Border Patrol is moving to halt a revolving-door policy of sending migrants back to Mexico without any punishment. The agency this month is overhauling its approach on migrants caught illegally crossing the 1,954-mile border that the United States shares with Mexico. Years of enormous growth at the federal agency in terms of staff and technology have helped drive down apprehensions of migrants to 40-year lows. The Border Patrol now feels it has enough of a handle to begin imposing more serious consequences on almost everyone it catches from Texas to San Diego.
NEWS
January 3, 1987
Although written in a light vein, Inquirer staff writer Inga Saffron's Dec. 28 article about the Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board's border patrol revealed the utter nonsense that the LCB participates in to further its dubious mandate of controlling liquor and wine sales for the good of the state. It wastes money paying so-called enforcement agents to sit in parking lots at New Jersey liquor stores. These grown men watch for patrons with Pennsylvania license plates, note the amount of goods purchased, then chase them down and cite them for going to New Jersey to buy their favorite spirits.
NEWS
September 7, 2010
Armed government guards got on trains near the border to interrogate capriciously selected passengers about their citizenship and then carted away those who could not produce papers. The Soviet Union? East Germany? Well, no. It was the U.S. Border Patrol on an Amtrak in Rochester, N.Y. - close to the Canadian border. Border Patrol agents can question any person believed to be an alien concerning his or her right to be in America. They can do so within 100 miles from our external boundaries, including the one 12 miles off the coast.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2011 | By MANUEL VALDES, Associated Press
FORKS, Wash. - Benjamin Roldan Salinas, a forest worker in the country illegally, leapt into the frigid Sol Duc River to escape a pursuing U.S. Border Patrol Agent, disappearing into the fast-moving waters. For more than three weeks, his family, friends and volunteers - including other illegal immigrants - scoured the dense forest along the swollen river's banks for any sign of him. The Border Patrol suspected that Salinas had survived and fled. Still, as many as 150 people at a time continued to look.
NEWS
February 5, 2012 | By Alicia A. Caldwell, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Border Patrol agents have racked up daily overtime at a cost of about $1.4 billion in the last six years while the number of arrests of illegal border crossers has fallen to the lowest level in nearly 40 years, an Associated Press analysis of agency records finds. Since the 2006 budget year, the agency responsible for stopping would-be illegal crossers and smugglers from making it into the United States over land and sea borders has spent more than $1.4 billion on what is described as "administrative uncontrollable overtime," according to the data provided by the Border Patrol.
NEWS
December 28, 1986 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Staff Writer
With a load of hooch in their hatchback, the pair of Pennsylvania rumrunners eased out of the parking lot of the Roger Wilco Discount Liquor Supermarket in Burlington City and headed for the Pennsylvania border. The revenuers were right behind them. But as the couple approached the tollbooth at the Burlington-Bristol Bridge, the undercover operation was beginning to unravel. Like a best man before a wedding, Salero Casiano, an agent of the Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board (LCB)
NEWS
August 12, 2006 | By Bonnie L. Cook INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Pennsylvania Army National Guard soldier who died after she collapsed while deployed on a border-patrol mission in the Arizona desert will undergo an autopsy today, a medical official said. Specialist Kirsten Fike, 36, of Bear Lake, Warren County, was among 500 National Guard volunteers made available by Gov. Rendell for work with Operation Jump Start, the border-sealing initiative set in motion recently by President Bush. Fike, a mother and former member of the U.S. Air Force, joined the National Guard June 12, said Army spokesman Lt. Jay Ostrich.
NEWS
August 10, 2016
President Obama has been very critical of Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump's threat to arrest and send home millions of undocumented immigrants, but his administration has said little about a deplorable deportation program affecting Dominican-born Haitians, the largest stateless population in the Western Hemisphere. In 2010, the Dominican Republic amended its constitution to deny citizenship to anyone born in the country who didn't have at least one parent who was born there too. Overnight, 200,000 Dominicans of Haitian descent were stripped of citizenship.
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NEWS
August 16, 2016
ISSUE | HAITI U.S. aid sorely needed It is deplorable that the United States sends military aid to the Dominican Republic and trains its police and border patrol officers, while that Caribbean country has stripped the citizenship of 200,000 Dominican-born Haitians ("No country to call home," Tuesday). In the past year, more than 60,000 people have been deported, while Haiti struggles to recover from a 2010 hurricane. It is time for the United States to give Haiti's economy a boost so its citizens won't need to leave to find jobs.
NEWS
August 10, 2016
President Obama has been very critical of Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump's threat to arrest and send home millions of undocumented immigrants, but his administration has said little about a deplorable deportation program affecting Dominican-born Haitians, the largest stateless population in the Western Hemisphere. In 2010, the Dominican Republic amended its constitution to deny citizenship to anyone born in the country who didn't have at least one parent who was born there too. Overnight, 200,000 Dominicans of Haitian descent were stripped of citizenship.
NEWS
July 18, 2013
NOW THAT the Senate has passed a sweeping bipartisan bill to overhaul the nation's immigration laws, it's the House's turn to act. But, as expected, Republicans in that chamber are once again insisting that the border between the U.S. and Mexico be sealed as a prerequisite to approving broader reforms. Unless 90 percent of illegal border crossings are stopped once and for all, they say, they will not support any plan to grant legal status to the 11 million immigrants who are living in the country illegally.
NEWS
July 10, 2013
The Border Patrol's forces have doubled over the past decade even as foiled attempts to cross the U.S.-Mexico border illegally have sunk to a 40-year low. So, with astonishing obliviousness to its purpose, the bloated agency has turned to the same mission impossible that has kept countless other American law enforcers busy to little avail: the war on drugs. Much of what the Border Patrol's 21,000 agents are doing these days has nothing to do with patrolling the border. A growing number of those arrested by the agency are not Mexicans trying to enter the United States illegally, but Americans carrying relatively modest amounts of marijuana and other drugs.
NEWS
June 21, 2013 | By David Espo and Erica Werner, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - A breakthrough at hand, Republicans and Democrats reached for agreement Thursday on a costly, military-style surge to secure the leaky U.S.-Mexican border and clear the way for Senate passage of legislation giving millions of immigrants a chance at citizenship after years in America's shadows. Lawmakers in both parties described a southern border that would be bristling with law enforcement manpower and technology as a result of legislation at the top of President Obama's second-term domestic policy agenda.
NEWS
May 14, 2013 | By Elliot Spagat, Associated Press
SAN DIEGO - A widely touted Border Patrol initiative to send migrants back to Mexico far from the points they are caught entering the United States illegally has one of the worst track records at discouraging people from trying again, according to a new study that offers a detailed assessment of how the agency's new enforcement strategies are working. The aim of the so-called lateral repatriations is to make it more difficult for migrants to reconnect with smugglers. The Congressional Research Service, drawing on previously unpublished Border Patrol data, found those migrants were among the most likely to get caught again.
NEWS
April 11, 2013 | By David Nakamura, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - Federal authorities would be required to establish vast new border fences and surveillance as part of a bipartisan Senate plan aimed at allowing the nation's 11 million illegal immigrants to earn permanent residency and, potentially, citizenship, aides familiar with the proposal said Wednesday. The provisions would call on the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to increase surveillance to cover 100 percent of the southwestern border and to apprehend 90 percent of the people who attempt to enter the United States illegally, said the aides, who spoke on condition of anonymity.
NEWS
April 7, 2013 | By Elliot Spagat, Associated Press
TUCSON, Ariz. - The body of Ildefonso Martinez arrived on a Friday night last April as John Doe, Case No. 12-01000. He wore black Nike shoes, a Perry Ellis belt, jeans with a 34-inch waist, a Casio watch. For medical examiners at the Pima County morgue, his was an unusual case. Not in how he died - making the same arduous journey that has claimed thousands of illegal immigrants - but because he was identified so quickly. The death of migrants crossing the border has long been a tragic consequence of illegal immigration and, many say, the increase in U.S. border enforcement.
NEWS
October 3, 2012 | By Paul Davenport and Jacques Billeaud, Associated Press
NACO, Ariz. - A Border Patrol agent was shot to death Tuesday in Arizona near the U.S.-Mexico line, the first fatal shooting of an agent since a deadly 2010 firefight with Mexican bandits that spawned congressional probes of a botched government gun-smuggling investigation. The agent, Nicholas Ivie, 30, and a colleague were on patrol in the desert near Naco, Ariz., about 100 miles from Tucson, when shooting broke out shortly before 2 a.m. local time, the Border Patrol said. The second agent was shot in the ankle and buttocks, and was reported to be in stable condition Tuesday afternoon.
NEWS
February 19, 2012 | By Christopher Sherman, Associated Press
BROWNSVILLE, Texas - Max Pons is already anticipating the anxiety he'll feel when the heavy steel gate shuts behind him, leaving his home isolated on a strip of land between America's border fence and the violence raging across the Rio Grande in Mexico. For the last year, the manager of a sprawling preserve on the southern tip of Texas has been comforted by a gap in the rust-colored fence that gave him a quick escape route north in case of emergency. Now the U.S. government is installing the first gates to fill in this part of the fence along the Southwest border, and Pons admits he's pondering drastic scenarios.
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