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Border Security

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NEWS
May 11, 2013 | By David Espo and Erica Werner, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The bipartisan coalition behind a contentious overhaul of immigration laws stuck together on a series of test votes Thursday, turning back challenges from conservative critics as the Senate Judiciary Committee refined legislation to secure the borders and grant eventual citizenship to millions living in the country illegally. In a cavernous room packed with lobbyists and immigration activists, the panel rejected moves to impose tougher conditions on border security before those who entered the country illegally could take steps along a new pathway to citizenship.
NEWS
March 25, 2002 | By Seth Borenstein and Lenny Savino INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
In the best of times, the pressure on officers who guard U.S. borders is tremendous, contradictory and maddening. Keep contraband, terrorists and illegal immigrants out. Hurry legitimate trade and travelers through. But these are not the best of times. A nation that was attacked Sept. 11 by foreign nationals is scrambling to prevent future attacks even as more than 500 million people cross its borders each year. The technology in use is outdated. Red tape and overlapping government bureaucracies complicate matters further.
NEWS
March 14, 2004 | By Carol Rosenberg INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
After months of blaming attacks on foreign fighters, U.S. officials yesterday announced a $300 million plan to beef up enforcement along Iraq's porous 2,260-mile border by adding more forces, sensors and computer tracking of visitors. Iran comes first. U.S. and Iraqi authorities will close 16 eastern border crossings this week, leaving just three entry points for millions of Shiite Muslim pilgrims and other would-be guests. The Syrian border comes next. "Foreign terrorists are present in Iraq.
NEWS
June 24, 2013 | By Lorraine Woellert, BLOOMBERG
WASHINGTON - Republicans will forfeit a chance to win Hispanics to their party if Congress can't agree on a measure to overhaul immigration laws, supporters of the legislation said. "If it fails and we are blamed for its failure, our party is in trouble with Hispanics," Sen. Lindsey Graham (R., S.C.), a cosponsor of the bill, said on Fox News Sunday . The measure, which would be the first major change in U.S. immigration law since 1986, would beef up border security and give 11 million residents a chance to become American citizens.
NEWS
December 6, 2005 | By Chris Mondics INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Another terrorist strike in the United States is inevitable, yet the government doles out homeland security money for pork-barrel spending and has failed to develop an adequate airline screening list of potential hijackers, the panel that investigated the Sept. 11 attacks said yesterday in its final follow-up report. Panel chairman Thomas Kean, the former New Jersey governor, said there was still no unified list of terror suspects for use by air-travel screeners. And as for spending, Newark, N.J., for instance, used homeland security money to buy air-conditioned garbage trucks, and Columbus, Ohio, used it on body armor for firehouse dogs.
NEWS
July 24, 2014 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
WOMELSDORF, Pa. - Amid calls for expedited deportations, and counterarguments to allow the tens of thousands of unaccompanied children who have entered the United States illegally to stay, the issue is both a political football and a gut check on American values. While the crisis at the border in the Southwest can seem far away, it has a ripple effect in Pennsylvania, too. "Communities all across the country are being affected," U.S. Rep. Patrick Meehan (R., Pa.) said Tuesday after visiting Bethany Children's Home, a sanctuary for troubled youths on a sprawling campus next to Berks County farm fields.
NEWS
April 18, 2006 | By John M. Templeton Jr
President Bush blames Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid (D., Nev.), and Reid blames Majority Leader Bill Frist (R., Tenn.), for the collapse of the hastily arranged immigration compromise bill. Hopefully, the two-week Senate recess provided a cooling-off period. Months of posturing and pandering have not produced what America needs: a workable solution to the illegal-immigration crisis that is both just and fair. The two opposing sides - those who would prefer a bill consisting primarily of border-security measures and those who would prefer something that resembles amnesty - must now put the best interests of the nation above their self- interests as sparring politicians.
NEWS
April 13, 2006
When Congress returns from recess and takes up immigration again, what would you like to see in any legislation passed? On border security? On pathways to citizenship, guest-worker programs, or amnesty for the more than 11 million people in the country illegally? Send your ideas in 200 words or less by Tuesday. E-mail metroletters@phillynews.com. Please put "immigration" in the subject line. Or, mail the Readers Editor, The Inquirer, Box 41705, Philadelphia 19101; Fax: 215-854-4483.
NEWS
July 5, 2006 | Michael Barone
Michael Barone is a columnist for U.S. News & World Report Is it possible that the House and Senate will agree on an immigration bill? For most of June, the answer seemed to be no. The House Republican leadership announced it would not appoint members of a conference committee to reconcile the border-security-only bill the House passed in December with the border-security-plus-guest-worker-plus-legalization bill passed by the Senate in...
NEWS
July 25, 2006 | By John Boehner
Immigration reform and border security are front and center in the political arena for a very good reason. The American people recognize the challenges presented by these issues, and they are demanding reforms that secure our nation's borders and enforce our laws. House Republicans want to end the flood of illegal immigrants that endangers our national security and jeopardizes our efforts to make America safe in a post-9/11 world. We recently announced five principles to guide our efforts as we work with the Senate on legislation that secures our borders and puts a premium on strict enforcement of our laws: Provide additional resources to federal and state authorities to strengthen border patrol efforts.
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NEWS
July 27, 2014
ISSUE | GOVERNING What if Washington closed for business? Though both state and federal governments are the targets of the offensive that E.J. Dionne calls "conservatism's increasingly ferocious opposition to government," the preponderance of these rants are hurled against the federal government ("Populist and pro-business," July 22). So it's worth recalling the benefits of our central government, effects that obviously safeguard and enhance the lives of all. The federal government keeps the air, water, and food supply free of contamination.
NEWS
July 24, 2014 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
WOMELSDORF, Pa. - Amid calls for expedited deportations, and counterarguments to allow the tens of thousands of unaccompanied children who have entered the United States illegally to stay, the issue is both a political football and a gut check on American values. While the crisis at the border in the Southwest can seem far away, it has a ripple effect in Pennsylvania, too. "Communities all across the country are being affected," U.S. Rep. Patrick Meehan (R., Pa.) said Tuesday after visiting Bethany Children's Home, a sanctuary for troubled youths on a sprawling campus next to Berks County farm fields.
NEWS
July 10, 2013
The Border Patrol's forces have doubled over the past decade even as foiled attempts to cross the U.S.-Mexico border illegally have sunk to a 40-year low. So, with astonishing obliviousness to its purpose, the bloated agency has turned to the same mission impossible that has kept countless other American law enforcers busy to little avail: the war on drugs. Much of what the Border Patrol's 21,000 agents are doing these days has nothing to do with patrolling the border. A growing number of those arrested by the agency are not Mexicans trying to enter the United States illegally, but Americans carrying relatively modest amounts of marijuana and other drugs.
NEWS
July 8, 2013 | By George Will
At this intermission in the immigration debate, with House Republicans preparing to look askance at the Senate's handiwork, the argument is becoming ever stranger. It has reached a boil, especially concerning border security, at a moment when illegal entries are at a 40-year low and net immigration from Mexico has recently been approximately zero, largely because enforcement efficiency has already been substantially improved and because America's economic growth is inferior to Mexico's.
NEWS
July 5, 2013 | BY BOB RAY SANDERS
  I'VE OFTEN heard people repeat an adage spoken by a character in a Robert Frost poem published almost 100 years ago. "Good fences make good neighbors" is the phrase uttered by the neighbor of the narrator in Frost's "Mending Wall," as he goes about his annual chore of mending the stone barrier that separates their two properties. The trouble is, as the narrator points out, that axiom was outdated when Frost penned those words in 1914. So you'd think it is truly antiquated reasoning today.
NEWS
June 24, 2013 | By Lorraine Woellert, BLOOMBERG
WASHINGTON - Republicans will forfeit a chance to win Hispanics to their party if Congress can't agree on a measure to overhaul immigration laws, supporters of the legislation said. "If it fails and we are blamed for its failure, our party is in trouble with Hispanics," Sen. Lindsey Graham (R., S.C.), a cosponsor of the bill, said on Fox News Sunday . The measure, which would be the first major change in U.S. immigration law since 1986, would beef up border security and give 11 million residents a chance to become American citizens.
NEWS
June 23, 2013 | By David Espo and Erica Werner, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Supporters of bipartisan immigration legislation smoothed the way Friday for likely Senate passage of their handiwork, overcoming last-minute disagreements at the bill's core and tacking on other items certain to build support. A test vote was set for Monday on the bill, which calls for a military-style surge to increase security at the U.S-Mexican border. At the same time it sets out a 13-year pathway to citizenship for millions of immigrants living in the United States unlawfully.
NEWS
June 21, 2013
By Greg Sargent The Congressional Budget Office's finding that immigration reform would reduce the deficit hasn't stopped opponents from pressing forward with other absurd arguments. Case in point: Ted Cruz argued on the Senate floor recently that immigration reform should be opposed for the sake of undocumented immigrants. Cruz (R., Texas) stood before an image of a graveyard and solemnly eulogized unnamed souls killed crossing the border. "This is a system that produces human tragedy," he said.
NEWS
June 21, 2013 | By David Espo and Erica Werner, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - A breakthrough at hand, Republicans and Democrats reached for agreement Thursday on a costly, military-style surge to secure the leaky U.S.-Mexican border and clear the way for Senate passage of legislation giving millions of immigrants a chance at citizenship after years in America's shadows. Lawmakers in both parties described a southern border that would be bristling with law enforcement manpower and technology as a result of legislation at the top of President Obama's second-term domestic policy agenda.
NEWS
June 20, 2013 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Welcome to the U.S. Senate, Jeff Chiesa. Now get ready to vote on one of the country's most divisive debates: immigration reform. Chiesa, a New Jersey Republican sworn in June 10 to fill the seat of the late Democratic Sen. Frank R. Lautenberg, is working out of a trailer where most of the walls are still bare, and he's still learning his way around the Capitol. He asked an aide to point to the nearest restroom after a vote Tuesday. So his views on complex legislation are still developing.
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