FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 13, 1987 | BY ADRIAN LEE
For Robert Bork, life beyond Arlen Specter is flickering out. The now exultant Democratic vote-counters had it right from the beginning, I guess. Despite the White House's frenzied last-minute effort, Bork was doomed. But despite the shiv Specter buried between his ribs, Bork has gone about his chores as a nominee to the last, presenting himself to still undeclared senators. And with enough composure to make even his most fervid critics wonder whether they were watching the last twitchings of a dead nomination or first signs of a reviving candidacy.
NEWS
October 24, 1987 | By Aaron Epstein, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The Senate, delivering its most resounding rejection of a president's Supreme Court nominee in this century, voted 58-42 yesterday against promoting U.S. Appeals Judge Robert H. Bork to the highest court in the nation. The vote ranked among the sharpest defeats suffered by President Reagan since he took office in 1981. "I am saddened and disappointed that the Senate has bowed today to a campaign of political pressure," Reagan declared in a statement that said Bork's confirmation proceedings had become "a spectacle of misrepresentation and single-issue politics.
NEWS
September 9, 1987 | By REGINALD STUART, Daily News Staff Writer
Congress today returns from its summer vacation to face an unusually full agenda that includes a series of money bills to keep the government operating, a trade bill that could impact jobs, and consideration of a Supreme Court nominee whose views are being attacked as too conservative. Added to these matters, which the lawmakers were considering before their August recess, are growing concern over the steadily increasing American presence in the Persian Gulf and aviation safety at home, the latter the subject of considerable voter mail in recent weeks.
NEWS
July 6, 1987 | BY LOU CANNON
True believers on both sides share a view of the shape the Supreme Court will take if U.S. Appeals Court Judge Robert H. Bork survives the Senate confirmation process. As expressed by Daniel J. Popeo, founder of the conservative Washington Legal Foundation, "We have the opportunity now to roll back 30 years of social and political activism by the Supreme Court. " Making the same point from a different perspective, Ralph Neas, executive director of the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights, said Bork's confirmation would "jeopardize the civil-rights achievements of the past 30 years.
NEWS
April 21, 1989 | By GEORGE F. WILL
Speaker Jim Wright's "personal ethics" are now the focus of attention in this continental superpower. Many people, including Wright, say that whatever is to be done, 'twere well it were done quickly. Nonsense. Let's all wallow in it, for weeks, months if possible. 'Tis said there should be no element of Republican revenge in this. Why ever not? It is said we must avoid an orgy of recrimination and a ruinous escalation of nastiness on the ethics front. I say let the ruination begin.
NEWS
September 30, 1987 | By Louis B. Schwartz
The Bork nomination should trouble those who share his conservative views as well as those who disagree. That is because conservatives as well as liberals value confidence in the courts. There are three reasons why Bork undermines that confidence: His intellectual integrity is dubious. He pretends to believe in interpretation according to "original intent" and in "judicial restraint," whereas in practice he is a radical activist in reading his political and economic views into the law. His nomination is an open attempt by the Reagan adminstration to "pack" the court in favor of the President's "agenda," comparable to President Roosevelt's failed attempt to pack the conservative Supreme Court of the 1930s with new liberal votes.
NEWS
September 18, 1987 | By MARIA GALLAGHER, Daily News Staff Writer
Only one reporter got a one-on-one interview with President Reagan here yesterday. Jasmine Silva interrupted the commander-in-chief's lunch at a fund-raiser for U.S. Sen. John Heinz, stood on a chair so she could look him in the eye, and asked a single question. At 5 1/2, Jasmine Silva of North Philadelphia just might be the youngest member of the press corps ever to interview the president. "I asked if Judge (Robert) Bork would be good for the future, and he said yes," Jasmine recounted afterward.
NEWS
October 12, 1991 | By GEORGE F. WILL
Now, at last, perhaps even Washington, which is usually the last to learn, even about itself, will at least dimly understand the radical damage done to public life by the Bork confirmation scandal. When that campaign turned political differences into occasions for moral assaults and was crowned with success, the downward ratchet of civility clicked many times. Watching the stomach-turning spectacle of the ruining of Clarence Thomas, Americans far from this sick city must be wondering, "How did it come to this?"
NEWS
October 28, 2011
AS ICONIC 60-Minute Man Chuck Bednarik would say, the guy who knows what's on the other side of the field has a distinct advantage over the guy who stays in his own zone. It helps you to neutralize or - as in the case of Frank Gifford - horizontal-ize the enemy. It's the same with politics; putting yourself in the opposition's shoes is a masterful strategy, one that the great Vince Lombardi would have cheered. And I have to say that last week the game ball went to the liberals, who displayed an amazing ability to call out and criticize the most radical, dangerous members of their squad.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 20, 2012 | By Matthew Barakat and Mark Sherman, Associated Press
McLEAN, Va. - Robert H. Bork, 85, who stepped in to fire the Watergate prosecutor at Richard Nixon's behest and whose failed 1987 nomination to the Supreme Court helped draw the modern boundaries of cultural fights over abortion, civil rights and other issues, died Wednesday from heart complications at a hospital in Arlington, Va. Brilliant, blunt and piercingly witty, Robert Heron Bork had a long career in the law that took him from respected academic...
NEWS
December 20, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
ROBERT H. BORK, who stepped in to fire the Watergate prosecutor at Richard Nixon's behest and whose failed 1987 nomination to the Supreme Court helped draw the modern boundaries of cultural fights over abortion, civil rights and other issues, died Wednesday. He was 85. Robert H. Bork Jr. confirmed that his father died at Virginia Hospital Center in Arlington, Va., from complications of heart ailments. Brilliant, blunt and piercingly witty, Robert Heron Bork had a long career in the law that took him from respected academic to a totem of conservative grievance.
NEWS
October 28, 2011
AS ICONIC 60-Minute Man Chuck Bednarik would say, the guy who knows what's on the other side of the field has a distinct advantage over the guy who stays in his own zone. It helps you to neutralize or - as in the case of Frank Gifford - horizontal-ize the enemy. It's the same with politics; putting yourself in the opposition's shoes is a masterful strategy, one that the great Vince Lombardi would have cheered. And I have to say that last week the game ball went to the liberals, who displayed an amazing ability to call out and criticize the most radical, dangerous members of their squad.
NEWS
January 21, 2006 | By Chris Mondics INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Judge Samuel A. Alito Jr., in written responses to questions from Senate Democrats, said that most law-school professors were "generally believed" to be left of center, and that he had supported the failed nomination of Robert Bork to the Supreme Court because of Bork's reputation for judicial restraint. Alito's answers, released yesterday by Sen. Arlen Specter (R., Pa.), chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, added new detail and context to his testimony before the committee last week.
NEWS
January 18, 2006 | By DEBORAH LEAVY
WHY DOES Samuel Alito appear to be coasting toward confirmation when Robert Bork, his ideological sibling, was denied a seat on the Supreme Court? Alito's bland face, thinning hair and glasses made him look like the nerd in the next cubicle in the office. He was soft-spoken, modest and calm in responding to senators. When asked the hard questions, Alito, like John Roberts before him, carefully recited the tests to be applied and the factors to be considered. But he gave no clues about his own views, or the legal framework within which he would weigh various factors, or the ideological prism through which he - like every other judge - approaches every case.
NEWS
January 8, 2004 | By Patrick Kerkstra INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When former President Ronald Reagan nominated conservative jurist Robert H. Bork for the U.S. Supreme Court in 1987, Sen. Arlen Specter doomed Bork's bid with sharp questioning and a party-line-crossing "no" vote. More than 16 years later, Bork has struck back. Saying he was alarmed by the likelihood that Specter would become chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee if reelected, Bork yesterday endorsed U.S. Rep. Pat Toomey, a conservative who is challenging Specter in the April primary.
NEWS
August 27, 2003 | By DANIEL PIPES
ETIQUETTE CALLED on me not to talk about my nomination to the board of the United States Institute of Peace while it was in process. During five months of enforced quiet, I endured Sen. Edward Kennedy borking me as someone not "committed to bridging differences and bringing peace," a Washington Post editorial criticizing me as "a destroyer" of cultural bridges, and other slings. My months of silence finally came to an end Friday, when President Bush invoked his constitutional authority (Article II, Section 2)
NEWS
March 24, 2001 | By Marie Cocco
Whoever gave a second thought to the American Bar Association? Conservatives nursing a grudge, it turns out. And that means the White House. After a half-century as the primary independent reviewer of candidates for federal judgeships, the ABA is on its way out, the Bush administration has made clear. The Federalist Society is in. It's Bork's best revenge. Conservative animus against the ABA has built since 1987, when Robert Bork was given a mixed rating - but not the "unqualified" badge of dishonor - because some reviewers thought his jurisprudence too extreme.
BUSINESS
April 21, 1998 | By Rory J. O'Connor, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Microsoft's archrival, Netscape, has hired one-time Supreme Court nominee Robert Bork to press the Justice Department to bring a broader case against the software giant. Bork, an expert in antitrust law who has long argued that one company may dominate an industry without hurting consumers, contended yesterday that Microsoft's prominence has gone too far. "I think the Department of Justice . . . will see predatory practices are in fact being used and they should be stopped," Bork said.
NEWS
June 23, 1997 | By Donald Kaul Donald Kaul is a syndicated columnist
Ihave a confession to make. I was brainwashed by conservatives. I know, I know - next to telling the National Enquirer you've been kidnapped by alien creatures, it's the most embarrassing admission you can make, but there it is. I'm not sure how it happened. One minute, I was keeping my guard up against right-wing blather; the next, I'd fallen victim to a sucker punch, from Robert Bork, of all people. You remember Bork. After playing a Rosencrantz/Guildenstern role in the Watergate Follies, he hit big time when nominated to the Supreme Court by Ronald Reagan.
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