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NEWS
April 22, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
A proposed park alongside Pitman's Broadway Theatre is getting a boost from Hollywood. Don Wildman, the witty and literate host of the Travel Channel's Mysteries at the Museum series, is helping raise money to transform a forlorn portion of Theatre Avenue into an outdoor gathering spot called Theatre Plaza. "You grow up in a town like Pitman and you're bonded to it for life," said Wildman, 54, who visited the borough Saturday to make a video that will promote the project online and perhaps on cable TV. "Pitman is the foundation of everything I'm interested in. " Wildman moved to Pitman as a 4-year-old in 1965 and recalls seeing The Poseidon Adventure and other hits on the Broadway's big screen.
NEWS
April 26, 2010 | By Marc Wallace
As a transplanted Philadelphian living in New York, I'm going to lose it if I read one more story about how "some Philadelphians occasionally refer to their city as the sixth borough of New York. " Say what? The sixth borough! Is there anybody from Philly who ever said that? Yeah, and I've also read the claim that some 8,000 commuters make the 75-minute train ride each workday from Philadelphia to New York. But listen, I've lived in New York City for 35 years, and so far I've met only one of these 8,000 people.
NEWS
March 24, 1988 | By Marilou Regan, Special to The Inquirer
The Borough of Folcroft has decided to seek housing-rehabilitation funds from the Delaware County Redevelopment Authority. Borough secretary Jean Bozzelli announced Tuesday night at a continuation of the March 14 council meeting that Folcroft would apply for a Community Development Block Grant from the authority. Bozzelli said funds would be available to the borough for the acquisition and/or disposition of real estate in Folcroft that is deteriorated, suitable for rehabilitation or appropriate for historic preservation.
NEWS
September 16, 1997 | By Tamara Audi, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The borough now has the right to purchase the old Zane School from its owner for more than 30 years, the Rev. Carl McIntire, under an ordinance borough commissioners adopted last night. The ordinance declares the property at 756 Haddon Ave., which has been condemned since January for more than a dozen fire code violations, an "area in need of redevelopment. " Under New Jersey state law, that designation grants Collingswood "broader powers to take some action to rehabilitate what is an eyesore and waste of prime real estate," including purchasing the property, said Commissioner Louis Cappelli Jr. According to the law, the borough or any other potential developer must offer Mr. McIntire the fair market value determined by a certified appraiser.
NEWS
August 12, 2015 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
A white Paulsboro municipal employee is suing several minority elected officials for what she describes as a racially charged attempt to oust her. The shake-up surrounding borough administrator LeeAnn Ruggeri's employment became public earlier this year, when she was removed from her role as interim chief financial officer after she did not complete the necessary classes to earn the certification required to remain in the post permanently. The borough's 2014 audit found that the interim CFO - who at the time was Ruggeri - did not properly maintain the general ledger, failed to reconcile bank accounts, and overspent accounts.
NEWS
March 5, 2016 | By Justine McDaniel and Jason Laughlin, STAFF WRITERS
SEPTA wants a federal judge to issue a restraining order against a lower Bucks County municipality that the transit agency contends has imposed "exorbitant" fees and "excessive" regulations that are delaying a $36 million upgrade of its Levittown station. In a lawsuit filed Wednesday, the transit agency asked the court to bar the Borough of Tullytown from asserting any authority over the work at the station, which began in November. More than $250,000 in borough fees and other "regulatory burdens" have been preventing SEPTA from finishing the project, it claims.
NEWS
June 17, 1990 | By Robert F. O'Neill, Special to The Inquirer
A contractor on the Blue Route construction project has backed off an agreement to provide 30,000 cubic yards of free dirt to Prospect Park, according to borough officials. The dirt is needed to fill in Moores Lake Park in the borough's northwest end. Prospect Park had hoped to reclaim a marshy area of the park and develop it into a full-scale recreation facility. Councilman Ralph B. Moore reported at a Tuesday night business meeting that the contractor, Kiwit-Perini, advised the borough it now has a number of requests for clean fill and will not be able to provide the dirt free.
NEWS
September 7, 2012 | By Robert Moran, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Colwyn Borough councilman has filed a federal lawsuit alleging that he was assaulted by police at a council meeting last year. Council President Tonette Pray disputed that any assault occurred at the June 9, 2011, meeting. "None of that happened," Pray said. "Basically, this is all political. " Councilman Sunday Nwegbo was arrested for disorderly conduct at the meeting. In October, he was found not guilty in District Court. At that meeting, according to the lawsuit filed Tuesday, Nwegbo was criticizing McDonald Ford, then the borough's treasurer, when Ford "attempted to physically attack" Nwegbo.
BUSINESS
December 28, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Population: 2,677 (2012) Median income: $54,911 (2012) Area: 0.36 square miles Settlements in the last three months: 8 Homes for sale: 12 Days on market: 61 Median sale price: $210,000 Housing units: 1,209 units, mostly twins and singles School district: Springfield Sources: U.S. Census Bureau, City-Data.com, Berkshire Hathaway Home Services Fox & Roach HomExpert Market Report; Barbara Mastronardo, Weichert Realtors;...
NEWS
July 4, 2013 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
If a bunch of young, upstart environmentally conscious entrepreneurs were going to make the struggling Chester County borough of Modena their home base, then the name had to reflect their place and purpose. So Jim Bricker, Rob Mastrippolito, and Brendan Steer relocated Waste Oil Recyclers, their vegetable-oil fuel conversion business, and then renamed the industrial park they later purchased. Out of Modena came MoGreena. The tiny borough, about a third of a square mile with 585 residents, is now a hub for several like-minded businesses whose goal is to live with less.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
April 13, 2016 | By Jason Laughlin, STAFF WRITER
SEPTA and Tullytown have made peace about a month after the transit agency sued the borough in a dispute over construction at the Levittown train station. The two reached a settlement April 7 regarding construction at the Levittown train station in which SEPTA agreed to pay the borough $34,031 in professional fees and accepted full responsibility and liability for the new station. In return, the borough won't claim any authority over SEPTA's construction plans for the station. "The borough is pleased the lawsuit is settled and it will no longer have responsibility for this project," said Michael Sellers, the borough solicitor.
REAL_ESTATE
April 11, 2016 | By Alan J. Heavens, Staff Writer
One in a continuing series spotlighting real estate markets in the region's communities. From what Realtors say, Perkasie is a place coveted by those enamored of small-town living. A whole lot of building designed to enhance that small-town experience is going on now in the Bucks County borough 30 miles north of Philadelphia. That includes more than 300 homes, a surprising number in a community of 8,515 people, especially considering there isn't as much residential building going on in the suburbs now as there was before or during the boom years of a decade ago. "Today's buyers want new, and residential construction is a good sign of an active real estate market," says Frank Dolski, an agent with Coldwell Banker Hearthside Real Estate in Lahaska.
NEWS
March 5, 2016 | By Justine McDaniel and Jason Laughlin, STAFF WRITERS
SEPTA wants a federal judge to issue a restraining order against a lower Bucks County municipality that the transit agency contends has imposed "exorbitant" fees and "excessive" regulations that are delaying a $36 million upgrade of its Levittown station. In a lawsuit filed Wednesday, the transit agency asked the court to bar the Borough of Tullytown from asserting any authority over the work at the station, which began in November. More than $250,000 in borough fees and other "regulatory burdens" have been preventing SEPTA from finishing the project, it claims.
REAL_ESTATE
February 15, 2016
Population: 7,546 (2014) Median household income: $79,063 Area: 3.1 square miles Settlements in the last three months: 20 Homes for sale: 37 Average days on market: 88 Median sale price: $226,700 Housing stock: 2,949 units, older and newer. School district: Berlin (K-8); Eastern High School, Voorhees (9-12) SOURCES: U.S. Census Bureau; Berlin Borough; Val Nunnenkamp, Berkshire Hathaway Home Services Fox & Roach Realtors, Marlton
REAL_ESTATE
February 14, 2016
One in a continuing series spotlighting real estate markets in the region's communities. There are those who might observe that a visit to Berlin, N.J., was "long-a-coming. " This Camden County borough was originally known by that name, attributed alternatively to shipwrecked sailors looking for a brook with clean water, to stagecoach travelers stopping here on an otherwise boring ride from Philadelphia to the Shore, or, most likely, to the Leni-Lenape and the Lonaconing Trail from the Delaware River to the Atlantic Ocean, as the historic marker notes.
REAL_ESTATE
February 7, 2016
One in a continuing series spotlighting real estate markets in the region's communities. On one January Sunday, Kennett Square basked in bright sunshine and, according to the National Weather Service, a record-setting 65 degrees. It was a picture-perfect day for a visit to what is still considered "the Mushroom Capital of the World," even though there has been a lot of industry consolidation in recent years. Nursing- and rehabilitation-center giant Genesis HealthCare, with $4.4 billion in annual revenue and 90,000 employees, made 101 E. State St. its corporate headquarters in the late 1990s and has contributed to Kennett Square's growth and prosperity since.
NEWS
January 15, 2016 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
If the apartment building at 208 White Horse Pike in Oaklyn had a name, it is lost to history. "People just called it 208," says Mayor Bob Forbes, whose grandmother once lived there. Decades of namelessness - as well as emptiness - should end in March, when the first tenants arrive at the freshly renovated and stylishly rebranded "Oaklyn Villas" apartments. "This is a one-bedroom," developer Richard DePetro says, guiding the mayor, two Camden County officials, and me on a tour of the $1.9 million project.
NEWS
January 14, 2016 | By Rita Giordano, Staff Writer
The Haddonfield Board of Commissioners approved two agreements-in-principle Tuesday night that could lead to the borough's purchasing the Bancroft School property for public use and private housing, but not for a contested drug and alcohol treatment center. Both proposed agreements are subject to action by the borough planning board, public discussion, and further action and approval by the commissioners. They passed the board by 3-0. "After months of discussion and negotiations, I am very pleased that we have reached an agreement regarding the future of the Bancroft property in Haddonfield," Mayor Jeff Kasko said in a statement.
NEWS
December 21, 2015 | By Jake Blumgart
Haddonfield is just the sort of pristine little town that was made for a pre-Christmas shopping binge. Haddonfield has long prided itself on its history - 150 buildings were declared architecturally significant in 1971. "We have history here," the Preservation Society's executive director, Joan Aiken, told the Bulletin in 1980. "We didn't make it up, like Chestnut Hill did. " Amid its colonial housing and quaint side streets sits the admirably pedestrian-friendly downtown shopping district along Kings Highway.
NEWS
December 16, 2015 | By Caitlin McCabe, STAFF WRITER
Just when things in Colwyn appeared to be turning around, the tiny Delaware County borough has returned to its normal status: chaos. On Monday, Pennsylvania Auditor General Eugene DePasquale said audits of the borough fire company's relief association uncovered nearly $90,000 in unauthorized and undocumented spending. As a result, state funds for the volunteer organization have been put on hold. The news comes two weeks after Colwyn's council appeared to make strides toward recovery by approving a financial plan from the state, yet its implementation remains uncertain.
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