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Bosnian Serbs

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NEWS
March 12, 1996 | By Anna Husarska
The exodus of Bosnian Serbs from Sarajevo's suburbs, which are being transferred to the adminstration of the Bosnian-Croat federation, may well mean that the whole idea of keeping Bosnia together as a multiethnic country is doomed. At the beginning of this drama, Secretary of State Warren Christopher, eager to preserve a semblance of compliance with the Dayton agreement, expressed the hope "that many of the Serbs will remain. " United Nations and NATO officials tried for a week or two to stop the exodus and to persuade the Bosnian Serbs they had nothing to fear if they stayed.
NEWS
March 27, 1993 | By Rick Lyman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The old woman, in a green cardigan held together by a safety pin, sat on a rock by the road with her one good eye keeping close watch over 12 sheep and two grandchildren. "We fled our village many weeks ago," Milijana Obradovic said. "Everything is destroyed. We don't even know where the graves are. " The 11-month-old civil war that has all but destroyed Bosnia - pitting Serbs against Muslims and Croatians - caught the 66-year-old Serbian farmer off guard. In her village, there had been no enmity among the various ethnic groups.
NEWS
September 8, 1995 | By Trudy Rubin
The war in Bosnia has been with us for so long that it's hard to believe it could soon be over. But a possible end to the fighting has never been closer. The Clinton administration's new tactics of tough diplomacy combined with NATO bombing raids against Bosnian Serb military targets around their capital of Pale have changed the entire dynamics of the Bosnian conflict. For the first time in years, the Bosnian Serbs are on the defensive. Yet there are disturbing hints that NATO and the Clinton administration could go wobbly before the bombing strikes achieve their desired objectives.
NEWS
March 23, 1993 | By Dan Stets, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The young man insisted on going somewhere private, an alley cafe, to talk. And like most ethnic Serbs here, he was afraid to give his family name. "If this area is going to be turned into a Muslim enclave, then the Serbs don't want to be here," he said. "I have no job. I have to sell things on the black market to survive. " The man said that if he could, he would leave immediately to rejoin his wife, who is living in Serb territory. But contrary to a dramatic announcement Sunday by the U.N. Bosnian commander, it seems unlikely the man will see his wife any time soon.
NEWS
July 12, 1996 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
The international war crimes tribunal issued worldwide arrest warrants yesterday against Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic and his army commander, challenging the United States and its NATO allies to honor commitments to bring them to justice. The warrants against Karadzic and Gen. Ratko Mladic were issued on the first anniversary of the fall of Srebrenica, the U.N. "safe area" in eastern Bosnia where several thousand Bosnian Muslims were killed by Bosnian Serbs in the worst wartime massacre in Europe since World War II. The judicial action theoretically binds any government that has an opportunity to arrest Karadzic or Mladic.
NEWS
June 3, 1995 | By Barbara Demick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the most troubling incident involving the United States in three years of war here, an American F-16 jet was shot down yesterday while on a routine NATO mission patrolling Bosnian Serb territory. The development comes at a time when the United States is trying hard not to get sucked further into the Balkan mess. Tensions did slightly abate, however, last night when Bosnian Serbs released about 120 of the more than 320 U.N. peacekeepers they had held as hostages. The troops crossed the border into Serbia early today.
NEWS
May 2, 1993 | By Dan Stets, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic was isolated but still defiant yesterday as talks began on a peace plan to end more than a year of carnage in Bosnia-Herzegovina. The special Athens meeting, which drew all the key political leaders from the former Yugoslavia, may be the Bosnian Serbs' last chance to avoid U.S.-led military intervention to end the fighting that has resulted in more than 100,000 dead and missing. President Clinton met yesterday in Washington with top advisers to discuss a policy of "clearly defined" steps to stop the war. The main options include selected bombing of Bosnian Serb targets and lifting the arms embargo on Bosnian Muslims.
NEWS
October 13, 1995
President Franjo Tudjman of Croatia has always held his new country up as a bastion of democracy linked to Europe, living by Christian values. His aim was to contrast Croatia's behavior in the current Balkan wars with the kind of brutal ethnic cleansing practiced by Serbia. But in light of recent actions by the Croatian army, Mr. Tudjman's protestations of virtue are beginning to wear thin. United Nations officials and human rights organizations have accused Croatian soldiers of murdering scores of elderly Serbs who remained in Croatia's Krajina region after 200,000 rebel Serbs fled the area in August.
NEWS
August 7, 1994 | By Barbara Demick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The most popular slogan in Belgrade reportedly is Mir Nema Alternative - there is no alternative to peace. Indeed, peace has been something that Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic has been talking plenty about. His New Year's address was a rousing call to end the war in Bosnia-Herzegovina, and virtually every public appearance since the start of 1994 has hammered on the same theme. Last week, Milosevic took the most dramatic step yet. He closed the border between Serbia and Bosnia to cut off the war-mongering Bosnian Serbs in retaliation for their rejection of another peace proposal.
NEWS
June 16, 1995 | By Barbara Demick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The underdog is finally biting back. In fighting that began yesterday in the mountains northwest of here, the largely Muslim forces loyal to the Bosnian government are trying to shed their image as hapless victims of the prolonged war. The Bosnian army might not be strong enough to break the siege of Sarajevo - the obstacles are formidable. But it has transformed itself into a force to be reckoned with, compensating for its shortage of weapons with manpower and determination.
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SPORTS
May 8, 2013 | By Kate Harman, For The Inquirer
When Nicole Casagrand stepped into the pitching circle in the bottom of the first inning for the Hatboro-Horsham softball team, it wasn't strange that she was wearing sunglasses. The sun wasn't glaringly bright, but it had begun to peek through the clouds. By the fifth inning, though, the sun had gone away and the rain had started. And Casagrand entered the circle with her sunglasses on anyway. It's the lefthander's superstition. If she starts a game with her sunglasses on, as she did Tuesday in an 11-5 win over Suburban One Continental foe North Penn, she's going to finish with them on, too. But the shades also serve a more practical purpose.
NEWS
March 30, 2013
Iraq insurgents' bombs kill 23 BAGHDAD - A string of bombings targeting Shiite mosques in Iraq killed at least 23 people and wounded dozens Friday, officials said. The attacks were the latest in spectacular assaults staged by insurgents seeking to undermine the Shiite-led government's efforts to achieve security across the country. There was no immediate claim of responsibility, but the bombings bore the hallmarks of al-Qaeda's Iraq branch. Friday is a particularly popular day for militants to undertake such attacks because of the rush of mostly men and boys to the mosques throughout the country to hear Muslim sermons and take part in communal prayers.
NEWS
March 28, 2013 | By Mike Corder, Associated Press
THE HAGUE, Netherlands - The Yugoslav war-crimes tribunal convicted two senior Bosnian Serbs on Wednesday of key roles in a campaign of murder, torture, and persecution against Muslims and Croats during the 1992-95 Bosnian war and sentenced them each to 22 years in prison. Mico Stanisic was the interior minister in the breakaway Bosnian Serb republic set up during his country's bitter war, while Stojan Zupljanin was a senior security official in charge of police. Prosecutors had sought life sentences for both men after charging them with involvement in a criminal conspiracy led by Bosnian Serb President Radovan Karadzic and his military chief, Gen. Ratko Mladic, to force Muslims and Croats out of what they considered to be Serb territory in Bosnia.
NEWS
June 29, 2012 | By Mike Corder, Associated Press
THE HAGUE, Netherlands - The Yugoslav war-crimes tribunal acquitted former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic of one charge of genocide Thursday but upheld 10 other counts related to atrocities in Bosnia's bloody war. While the decision was a setback for prosecutors and angered survivors in Bosnia, the 10 pending charges against Karadzic include another genocide count covering his alleged involvement in the 1995 Srebrenica massacre of 8,000...
NEWS
July 12, 2004 | By Matthew Schofield INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Before Baghdad, there was Sarajevo. Those impatient to know when the war in Iraq will end need to remember this place. The fighting here officially stopped in 1995, after more than 250,000 deaths. But in many ways, the war lingers. People still distrust one another. Children still stumble into minefields. Shrapnel and bullet holes mark the facades of hundreds of buildings. Unemployment hovers above 50 percent. Foreign economic aid and investment dwindle each year. Markets are filled with framed photos of Tito, the late president of the former Yugoslavia, as people yearn for the days of a communist dictator, when at least they had food.
SPORTS
April 1, 2000 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
The Bosnian Serb prime minister publicly apologized yesterday for letting his bodyguards beat up rival basketball fans after a game involving the team he runs. Three young men were treated for head injuries after four of Milorad Dodik's security staff attacked them. The attack followed the Bosnian Serb basketball championship Thursday night in Banja Luka, Bosnia-Herzegovina. Igokea, the team of which Dodik is a longtime fan and president, beat Borac, 90-79, knocking Borac from its six-year run as champion.
NEWS
September 15, 1999 | By Trudy Rubin
Events in Bosnia, Kosovo and East Timor have intensified the debate over the proper international response to war crimes committed inside sovereign states. Although NATO troops patrol Bosnia and Kosovo, and U.N. forces will soon arrive in East Timor, the issue remains extremely contentious. Western publics may recoil at TV scenes of fleeing civilians but don't want to die to save them. Pundits argue over who should intervene, or what can be legally called an international war crime.
NEWS
March 29, 1999 | By L.H. "Bucky" Burruss
The debate about whether the United States has a moral obligation or a legal right to intervene in Yugoslavia's civil war (President Clinton called it "essentially a guerrilla war for independence" a couple of days ago) is far from over, even as America's participation in the killing there is underway. Let there be no mistake in anyone's mind: The President has ordered America's participation in the deliberate and premeditated infliction of death and destruction in a sovereign nation's civil war. We did that in Vietnam, and I supported that effort.
NEWS
September 20, 1998 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The United States has actively supported Bosnian leader Biljana Plavsic over the last year with economic aid and other enticements to hold her in power in the country's Bosnian Serb enclave. But this carrot and stick strategy to keep peace in Bosnia collided last week with the centuries-old stubbornness of a Serb nationalism that refuses to support an ethnically diverse Bosnia. With Plavsic behind in a tight race for reelection as the president of the Republic of Srpska, the international community now faces the uneasy prospect of dealing with an ultra-nationalist leader - Nikola Poplasen - in her place.
NEWS
September 17, 1998 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In an apparent rejection of international efforts to stitch back together this ethnically divided country, Bosnian Serb ultranationalists are winning a larger than anticipated share of votes from last week's elections, according to unofficial preliminary results. A continuation of the voting pattern would be a setback to the 1995 U.S.-brokered Dayton peace agreement, which ended 3 1/2 years of war in Bosnia. It would show that despite $5 billion in international aid and the presence of 30,000 NATO troops, Bosnia remains a country shaped by ethnic animosities.
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