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NEWS
August 13, 1998 | By Linda Wright Moore
In mid-June, I wrote about Patricia Smith, a wonderfully talented African-American columnist, who resigned at the Boston Globe's request because she had fabricated people and quotations in four columns. In short, she lied. And although her falsehoods were elegantly and eloquently constructed, they violated the basic rule that separates journalists from novelists: you must write only truth. Deviate from that, and you'll lose your readers' trust. In the weeks that followed, a Globe investigation turned up 48 other questionable columns, in which researchers were unable to verify Smith's sources.
NEWS
February 4, 1997 | By Rich Henson, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Rep. Bud Shuster (R., Pa.), responding to a report in yesterday's Boston Globe that he was being investigated by a federal grand jury, said he was unaware of any investigation. According to the Globe, a grand jury is looking into allegations that Shuster used his influence, in exchange for campaign contributions, to help two Boston businessmen entangled in a Massachusetts highway project. Shuster, of Everett, Bedford County, is the chairman of the U.S. House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, which handles federal transportation spending and policies.
BUSINESS
June 11, 1993 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
The New York Times will buy the company that owns the Boston Globe for $1.1 billion under an agreement approved yesterday by the boards of both companies, the New York paper reported in today's issues. The largest in newspaper history, the sale would end family control at one of the last major independent papers in the country. It was to be announced in today's Globe as well. For now, terms of the sale ensure that the two newspapers will remain separate. According to sources at the Globe, the negotiations included contracts guaranteeing the employment of senior management.
NEWS
August 7, 1998 | By Henry Goldman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two months after forcing out one columnist for making up material, the Boston Globe yesterday found itself in a standoff with another columnist, Mike Barnicle, who refused to resign after editors discovered he had used several jokes from a book by comedian George Carlin. The writer's defiance - and the Globe's refusal to reconsider its position - captured the attention of this city, where Barnicle has enjoyed a wide following for 25 years, holding himself out as the feisty voice of what he has described as the "everyday working man. " "What I did was stupid," he said yesterday in one of several television interviews he gave outside his suburban home.
NEWS
August 8, 1998 | By Henry Goldman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mike Barnicle, the Boston Globe's lead columnist for the last 25 years, met with his publisher yesterday, two days after Barnicle refused to resign over a bunch of George Carlin jokes that Barnicle used without attribution in his column Sunday. Neither Barnicle nor the publisher, Benjamin B. Taylor, would comment after the meeting, and a newspaper spokesman said it was "not possible" that the Globe would back off its position that Barnicle must go. Later in the day, Thomas G. Stemberg, the chief executive officer for Staples, the office-retail chain, released a letter he had sent to the Globe saying that Barnicle's departure would make the Globe "a less attractive advertising vehicle.
SPORTS
October 19, 2002 | Daily News Staff Reports
Mike Arbuckle is among those mentioned as possible candidates for Boston's general manager vacancy, yesterday's Boston Globe reported. Arbuckle, the Phillies' assistant general manager for scouting and player development, surfaced as a candidate a day after Yankees vice president Gene Michael withdrew his name from consideration. Hired in 1992 as the Phillies' director of scouting, Arbuckle was promoted a year ago to assistant GM. He interviewed with Toronto last November for the Blue Jays' GM post.
NEWS
September 20, 2011 | By Sam Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Trenton-area man pleaded not guilty in Boston today to smuggling about five pounds of cocaine into the country inside several pair of shoes on a flight from the Dominican Republic. Carlos J. Lanns, 24, of Hamilton, allegedly carried 2.17 kilograms of cocaine in his checked luggage on a JetBlue flight that landed Monday night at Logan International Airport, said Massachusetts State Police. The cocaine, valued at more than $200,000, had been wrapped in plastic and secreted inside the insoles of eight pair of shoes, police said.
NEWS
February 6, 1989
LEAVING NO BASES COVERED The program for the House of Representatives for the week of Jan. 23, 1989, is as follows: Monday, Jan. 23. HOUSE NOT IN SESSION. Tuesday, Jan. 24. HOUSE MEETS AT NOON - NO LEGISLATIVE BUSINESS. Wednesday, Jan. 25. HOUSE NOT IN SESSION. Thursday, Jan. 26. HOUSE NOT IN SESSION. Friday, Jan. 27. HOUSE MEETS AT 11 A.M. - NO LEGISLATIVE BUSINESS. - Tony Coehlo, U.S. House of Representatives majority whip, letter to members with the schedule for a week preceding probable automatic pay increase.
SPORTS
February 18, 2008 | Daily News Wire Services
Patriots coach Bill Belichick has denied suggestions by a former employee that his club taped St. Louis' walkthrough before Super Bowl XXXVI in 2002. Belichick told the Boston Globe yesterday that in his entire coaching career, he has never seen recordings of another team's practice before playing that team. "I have never authorized, or heard of, or even seen in any way, shape, or form any other team's walkthrough," he said. "We don't even film our own. We don't even want to see ourselves do anything, that's the pace that it's at. Regardless, I've never been a part of that.
SPORTS
December 28, 1988 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Pittsburgh Steelers president Dan Rooney met with coach Chuck Noll again yesterday, but team officials declined to say whether they had settled differences on proposed changes in the coaching staff. Team spokesman Dan Edwards said no announcement would be made on the talks until next week. Rooney on Monday denied a Boston Globe report that said Noll had told his 11 assistant coaches he was considering resigning because he could not follow Rooney's orders to fire some of them.
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SPORTS
April 11, 2015 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Columnist
Shane Victorino was asked Thursday night if he still felt like a Phillie after two full seasons in Boston, including one that ended with a parade down Boylston Street celebrating the second World Series title of his career. The question was intended as a joke in light of the latest Papelgate incident that surfaced Wednesday night in the home clubhouse at Citizens Bank Park. The Flyin' Hawaiian opted to answer seriously and he essentially said something similar to what Phillies pitcher Jonathan Papelbon had told the Boston Globe, which predictably triggered another in a series of controversial episodes involving the highest-paid closer in baseball.
SPORTS
August 15, 2014 | BY RYAN LAWRENCE, Daily News Staff Writer rlawrence@phillynews.com
ANAHEIM, Calif. - For more than 6 weeks, from a month before the trade deadline until nearly 2 weeks after the deadline, Cole Hamels has had to answer questions about the possibility of playing somewhere other than Philly. On July 2, he made his stance clear. "I want to be here," Hamels said. "I'm happy to be here. " A month later, his family home in Newtown Square is up for sale and, well, people are connecting the dots. Even if the dots are on two different pages. Hamels, however, isn't looking for a new home in Philadelphia just yet. "We're building a house in Missouri," Hamels said before last night's game in Anaheim.
SPORTS
March 14, 2014 | By David Murphy, Daily News Columnist
CLEARWATER, Fla. - Let's start with Dan Jennings. He is the new general manager of the Marlins, and he said something interesting the other day. This was in the Boston Globe, in a story about Marlins slugger and human trade rumor Giancarlo Stanton. In his first 4 years in the majors, the 24-year-old outfielder has developed a reputation for two things: pulverizing baseballs and spending time on the disabled list. In baseball circles, the latter is often treated as seriously as the former.
SPORTS
February 7, 2014 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
Curt Schilling, one of the Phillies' all-time greatest pitchers and a current ESPN analyst, revealed Wednesday that he has cancer. "I've always believed life is about embracing the gifts and rising up to meet the challenges," Schilling said in a statement released by ESPN. "We've been presented with another challenge, as I've recently been diagnosed with cancer. " Schilling did not disclose the specific nature of his illness. The network was unclear about whether Schilling, 47, will assume his duties this season as an analyst for ESPN's Sunday night telecasts.
SPORTS
July 1, 2013
A triple bogey for Bill Haas . Double bogeys for Andres Romero and Roberto Castro . They still wound up in a four-way tie for the lead in the AT&T National at Congressional in Bethesda, Md., with James Driscoll , whose third round was dull by comparison. Driscoll had a 68, and was the only player in the field to break 70 all three rounds. The four were at 7-under 206. Ten players are separated by 4 shots going into the final round. In Pittsburgh, Fred Couples birdied three of the final five holes for a 3-under 67 and a 2-stroke lead after the third round of the Senior Players Championship.
NEWS
June 4, 2013
Man indicted in ricin case JACKSON, Miss. - A federal grand jury has indicted a man suspected of sending poison-laced letters to President Obama and other officials, according to an indictment made public Monday. The five-count indictment charges James Everett Dutschke, 41, with developing, producing, and stockpiling the poison ricin, threatening the president and others, and attempting to impede the investigation. Dutschke was arrested April 27 at his home in Tupelo. He is suspected of mailing ricin-laced letters on April 8 to Obama, Sen. Roger Wicker (R., Miss.)
NEWS
May 9, 2013 | BY ROBIN ABCARIAN
  WHAT KIND of power do the living have over the dead? It's a question that a Massachusetts town answered Sunday, when Cambridge City Manager Robert W. Healy said that he would not allow Tamerlan Tsarnaev, the alleged mastermind of the Boston Marathon bombings, to be buried in the local public cemetery. "The difficult and stressful efforts of the citizens of the City of Cambridge to return to a peaceful life would be adversely effected by the turmoil, protests and widespread media presence at such an interment," Healy said in a statement emailed to reporters.
NEWS
April 29, 2013 | By Michael Smerconish
When the Boston Globe conducted an online discussion of whether the lockdown of the city during the hunt for Dzhokhar Tsarnaev was overkill, one of its columnists, Lawrence Harmon, weighed in: "Friday's lockdown was more than an abundance of caution. It was an overreaction. Hundreds of millions of dollars were lost to the local economy. Yet authorities urged some Dunkin' Donuts stores to remain open for the convenience of officers while . . . hundreds of other businesses, large and small, shut down.
NEWS
April 28, 2013 | By Michael Kunzelman and Eileen Sullivan, Associated Press
BOSTON - Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhohkar Tsarnaev was moved from a hospital to a federal prison medical center while FBI agents searched for evidence Friday in a landfill near the college he was attending. Tsarnaev, 19, was taken from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, where he was recovering from a throat wound and other injuries suffered during an attempt to elude police last week, and was transferred to the Federal Medical Center Devens, about 40 miles from Boston, the U.S. Marshals Service said.
NEWS
April 27, 2013 | By Michael Kunzelman and Eileen Sullivan, Associated Press
BOSTON - Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhohkar Tsarnaev was moved from a hospital to a federal prison medical center while FBI agents searched for evidence Friday in a landfill near the college he was attending. Tsarnaev, 19, was taken from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, where he was recovering from a throat wound and other injuries suffered during an attempt to elude police last week, and was transferred to the Federal Medical Center Devens, about 40 miles from Boston, the U.S. Marshals Service said.
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