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NEWS
August 13, 1998 | By Linda Wright Moore
In mid-June, I wrote about Patricia Smith, a wonderfully talented African-American columnist, who resigned at the Boston Globe's request because she had fabricated people and quotations in four columns. In short, she lied. And although her falsehoods were elegantly and eloquently constructed, they violated the basic rule that separates journalists from novelists: you must write only truth. Deviate from that, and you'll lose your readers' trust. In the weeks that followed, a Globe investigation turned up 48 other questionable columns, in which researchers were unable to verify Smith's sources.
NEWS
February 4, 1997 | By Rich Henson, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Rep. Bud Shuster (R., Pa.), responding to a report in yesterday's Boston Globe that he was being investigated by a federal grand jury, said he was unaware of any investigation. According to the Globe, a grand jury is looking into allegations that Shuster used his influence, in exchange for campaign contributions, to help two Boston businessmen entangled in a Massachusetts highway project. Shuster, of Everett, Bedford County, is the chairman of the U.S. House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, which handles federal transportation spending and policies.
BUSINESS
June 11, 1993 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
The New York Times will buy the company that owns the Boston Globe for $1.1 billion under an agreement approved yesterday by the boards of both companies, the New York paper reported in today's issues. The largest in newspaper history, the sale would end family control at one of the last major independent papers in the country. It was to be announced in today's Globe as well. For now, terms of the sale ensure that the two newspapers will remain separate. According to sources at the Globe, the negotiations included contracts guaranteeing the employment of senior management.
NEWS
August 7, 1998 | By Henry Goldman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two months after forcing out one columnist for making up material, the Boston Globe yesterday found itself in a standoff with another columnist, Mike Barnicle, who refused to resign after editors discovered he had used several jokes from a book by comedian George Carlin. The writer's defiance - and the Globe's refusal to reconsider its position - captured the attention of this city, where Barnicle has enjoyed a wide following for 25 years, holding himself out as the feisty voice of what he has described as the "everyday working man. " "What I did was stupid," he said yesterday in one of several television interviews he gave outside his suburban home.
NEWS
August 8, 1998 | By Henry Goldman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mike Barnicle, the Boston Globe's lead columnist for the last 25 years, met with his publisher yesterday, two days after Barnicle refused to resign over a bunch of George Carlin jokes that Barnicle used without attribution in his column Sunday. Neither Barnicle nor the publisher, Benjamin B. Taylor, would comment after the meeting, and a newspaper spokesman said it was "not possible" that the Globe would back off its position that Barnicle must go. Later in the day, Thomas G. Stemberg, the chief executive officer for Staples, the office-retail chain, released a letter he had sent to the Globe saying that Barnicle's departure would make the Globe "a less attractive advertising vehicle.
SPORTS
June 27, 2011 | By John Gonzalez, Inquirer Columnist
If there's a reason to end interleague play, this is it. The next few days figure to test our collective patience and sanity. Brace yourself: Boston fans are coming. The Phillies will begin a three-game series with the Red Sox on Tuesday. Over the course of the season, the Fightin's do all sorts of promotional giveaways, everything from hats to bobbleheads. This would be a good time for a different kind of freebie: maybe noise-canceling headphones or, if those aren't enough and more drastic measures are needed, surplus World War II-era cyanide pills.
NEWS
March 9, 2016 | By Julia Terruso and Erin Arvedlund, STAFF WRITERS
Philadelphia will not host Forbes' 30 Under 30 millennial-fest this year, and probably not any time soon. The organizers announced Monday - at a news conference attended by the mayor of Boston and the governor of Massachusetts - that the four-day gathering will head to Boston in October. "I first want to thank Philadelphia for serving as host city over the last two years to kick off our Under 30 Summits," Randall Lane, editor of Forbes magazine, said in a news release. He went on to say that Boston's summit would triple in size and include young entrepreneurs worldwide.
SPORTS
October 19, 2002 | Daily News Staff Reports
Mike Arbuckle is among those mentioned as possible candidates for Boston's general manager vacancy, yesterday's Boston Globe reported. Arbuckle, the Phillies' assistant general manager for scouting and player development, surfaced as a candidate a day after Yankees vice president Gene Michael withdrew his name from consideration. Hired in 1992 as the Phillies' director of scouting, Arbuckle was promoted a year ago to assistant GM. He interviewed with Toronto last November for the Blue Jays' GM post.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2015 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Church spires jut from the Boston neighborhoods in Spotlight , one of the great movies about journalism, and one of the great movies of our time, period. The stained glass and weathered stone of these sanctuaries - many of them part of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Boston - often front onto parks and playgrounds full of children. Inside some of those same churches, for decades, priests preyed on children, molesting them, abusing them, and getting away with it, despite the complaints of family members, despite the knowledge of the archdiocese, the cardinals, the bishops.
BUSINESS
May 27, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, Staff Writer
A New York-based financial firm's plan to sell ownership shares of a waterfront apartment complex in Northern Liberties on the stock market has fizzled, the third misfire for the company's unconventional financing scheme in as many cities. ETRE Residential L.L.C. said in a filing last Thursday with the Securities and Exchange Commission that it was withdrawing its application to take developer Michael Samschick's Penn Treaty Village Pennthouses public "because of unfavorable market conditions.
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SPORTS
July 22, 2016 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
I probably don't have to tell you what a huge relief it was this week to learn that plagiarism is finally all right. Man, that took long enough. It is so easy to accidentally slip when writing about Philadelphia sports. Sometimes, particularly when the local landscape is outlined against a blue, gray October sky, the Four Horsemen occasionally ride again. As you well know, in dramatic lore, they are Famine, Pestilence, Destruction, and Death. But those are only aliases. Their real names are Eagles, Flyers, Sixers, and Phillies.
BUSINESS
May 27, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, Staff Writer
A New York-based financial firm's plan to sell ownership shares of a waterfront apartment complex in Northern Liberties on the stock market has fizzled, the third misfire for the company's unconventional financing scheme in as many cities. ETRE Residential L.L.C. said in a filing last Thursday with the Securities and Exchange Commission that it was withdrawing its application to take developer Michael Samschick's Penn Treaty Village Pennthouses public "because of unfavorable market conditions.
NEWS
April 22, 2016 | By Robert Moran, STAFF WRITER
It was an image that raced through social media on Monday: Two runners carrying a third toward the finish line of the Boston Marathon. 2 #BostonMarathon runners assist a fellow runner towards the finish line... ������ pic.twitter.com/6HFrJDHuGi — Only In Boston (@OnlyInBOS) April 18, 2016 Ari Ofsevit, suffering from heatstroke, had collapsed about 100 yards from the end. Jim Driscoll, of West Philadelphia, and another runner, Mitch Kies, from Texas, lifted Ofsevit from the pavement and draped his arms over their shoulders.
NEWS
April 20, 2016
Journalism Public service: The Associated Press, for a series of articles documenting the use of slave labor in the commercial seafood industry in Indonesia and Thailand. Breaking news reporting: Los Angeles Times staff, for coverage of the San Bernardino massacre and the ensuing investigation. Investigative reporting: Leonora LaPeter Anton and Anthony Cormier, of the Tampa Bay Times, and Michael Braga, of the Sarasota Herald-Tribune, for a project on escalating violence and neglect in Florida mental hospitals.
NEWS
April 13, 2016
STOP CALLING Donald Trump un-American. Like baseball and apple pie, he is synonymous with our country. To say otherwise is downright dishonest. But despite that ugly truth, the Boston Globe, with a satirical front page mocking Trump's policies, is the latest media outlet to say Trump's vision for the country is "profoundly un-American. " In my view, the only thing that's profound is our continued willingness to delude ourselves into believing that the millions of people following Trump are somehow outside the mainstream.
NEWS
March 10, 2016
By Helen W. Mallon Just days after the Oscar for Best Picture went to Spotlight , the movie detailing how the Boston Globe pursued the child sexual-abuse scandal and cover-up by the local archdiocese, a similar story was reported out of Western Pennsylvania. A grand jury investigation into the Archdiocese of Altoona-Johnstown revealed that hundreds of children were sexually abused by priests over a span of 40 years. And, once again, church officials were accused of participating in a massive cover-up.
NEWS
March 9, 2016 | By Julia Terruso and Erin Arvedlund, STAFF WRITERS
Philadelphia will not host Forbes' 30 Under 30 millennial-fest this year, and probably not any time soon. The organizers announced Monday - at a news conference attended by the mayor of Boston and the governor of Massachusetts - that the four-day gathering will head to Boston in October. "I first want to thank Philadelphia for serving as host city over the last two years to kick off our Under 30 Summits," Randall Lane, editor of Forbes magazine, said in a news release. He went on to say that Boston's summit would triple in size and include young entrepreneurs worldwide.
NEWS
March 4, 2016
By Christopher D. Benson There couldn't have been a better moment for the movie Spotlight to win at the Academy Awards - for best picture and best original screenplay. Coming within days of GOP presidential front-runner Donald Trump's threatening remarks on freedom of the press, these Oscars serve as validation of the journalism profession. They also recognize the rendering of the story behind the story of the Boston Globe's Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative series exposing sexual abuse by Catholic priests.
NEWS
February 5, 2016
A BOSTON woman best known as the mother who called for her son to come home for dinner in a classic Prince pasta television commercial of the 1960s has died. Mary Fiumara was 88. Her son says she died Tuesday but hasn't revealed the cause of her death. Fiumara is remembered for yelling "Anthony! Anthony!" from an open window in her North End neighborhood apartment in the iconic TV spot. Anthony Martigetti played her son in the 1969 commercial. He told the Boston Globe she was "a legend" in the neighborhood.
NEWS
January 10, 2016
Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid Fathom Events, Cinemark University 6, United Artists King of Prussia, and United Artists Riverview, Sunday and Wednesday, Jan. 20. www.fathomevents.com Paul Newman does his own stunts, pedaling backward, planking, handstanding on an old safety bicycle during the "Raindrops Keep Fallin' on My Head" montage in the middle of the 1969 classic outlaws-on-the-run western, loosely based on the train robbing escapades of...
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