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Boston Marathon

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April 19, 2004 | By Ron Reid INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The 108th running of the Boston Marathon starts shortly before noon today for a field exceeding 15,000, all united in fear and loathing for the implausible New England weather. Last night's forecast for hot weather undoubtedly delighted the half-million fans who will line the course and cheer the runners on their 26.2-mile trek from Hopkinton to the Boylston Street finish line in Boston. For the runners, however, a warm day is worrisome if it will be simmering in 84-degree heat, as predicted, when the field hits "Heartbreak Hill.
SPORTS
April 21, 1997 | By Ron Reid, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The 101st Boston Marathon starts at noon today in rural Hopkinton, Mass., offering enough mystery to fill a library shelf of whodunits, a possible showdown between the forces of Kenya and Mexico, and maybe even $1 million to some unlikely American. That much and more is in the offing as as America's best-known road race begins its second century, winding 26.2 miles through human drama and the special miseries of Heartbreak Hill before concluding at the Boylston Street finish line.
SPORTS
April 18, 2011 | Associated Press
BOSTON - For more than a century, runners at the start of the Boston Marathon have faced a breeze blowing in from the Atlantic and a dread that Heartbreak Hill will sap their strength. Long regarded as one of the world's toughest courses, Boston has spurned professional pacesetters while encouraging tactics that favor strategy over speed. But Kenyan Robert Kiprono Cheruiyot upended that mind-set last year, dashing from Hopkinton to Copley Square in 2 hours, 5 minutes, 52 seconds to shatter the course record by 1:22.
NEWS
September 24, 1989 | By Donald D. Groff, Special to The Inquirer
My wife and I want to attend the 1990 Boston Marathon. Do you know of any travel packages built around the event? We're especially interested in tickets for the viewing areas at the end of the race. Marathon Tours of Boston offers packages that include discounted air fare and accommodations at 11 hotels ranging in price from $60 to $150 per night. Most of the hotels are located near the race's end at the John Hancock Tower. The company also offers a $12 tour of the marathon course, and for next year's race, which will be on April 16, is considering adding other activities such as whale watching.
SPORTS
April 18, 1988 | By Ron Reid, Inquirer Staff Writer
The nation's oldest footrace will be contested for the 92d time today in what may be the most international Boston Marathon ever. Although $315,000 in prize money and two Mercedes-Benz automobiles comprise the booty of Boston, those rewards are hardly all the race has to offer this year. The Olympic Games are only five months away, and today's 26-mile, 385-yard endurance test will serve as the Olympic trial for three nations. Finland will pick its male and female Olympic marathoners off their performances today, while Kenya and Tanzania each will use the race to determine its men's marathoners.
SPORTS
April 19, 1988 | By BILL FLEISCHMAN, Daily News Sports Writer
The one-day-old world marathon record remained intact, but there weren't any complainers among Boston's demanding sports fans. Not when the cheering Patriots Day crowds had just seen the greatest finish in the 92-year history of the Boston Marathon. After running shoulder to shoulder on the glistening wet roads for the last five miles yesterday, Kenya's Ibrahim Hussein outkicked Tanzania's Juma Ikangaa about 30 yards from the finish line to win in 2 hours, 8 minutes and 43 seconds.
NEWS
April 14, 1991 | By Christine Bahls, Special to The Inquirer
Roger Schell proudly points to the two photographs of himself that were taken two years apart. The one shot in May 1987 shows an overweight man sitting placidly on a front porch. His shoulders are slouched, his hair disheveled. Schell weighed 210 at the time. In July 1989, Schell, a teacher in the Pennsbury School District, was hardly the same man. At a svelte 160 pounds, Schell, in the other photo, stands proudly next to a friend as they shake hands. The two are dressed in running garb and are smiling at the camera.
SPORTS
April 20, 2009 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Defending champion Robert Cheruiyot of Kenya will go for his fifth Boston Marathon title today, and Dire Tune of Ethiopia will try to repeat as the women's winner in the world's longest-running annual marathon. Ryan Hall and Kara Goucher are the top U.S. man and woman in their respective fields. Joining them at the Hopkinton, Mass., starting line will be more than 25,000 runners. College football Army football great Felix "Doc" Blanchard, the 1945 Heisman Trophy winner, died Saturday at age 84 at his home in Bulverde, Texas, his family said.
SPORTS
April 23, 2014 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
IF A PICTURE paints a thousand words, this was an American classic. A runner collapsed near the finish line of yesterday's Boston Marathon, not far from where the first bomb exploded last year. Wesley Lowery, a photographer for the Washington Post, tweeted pictures of what happened next. First one runner stopped to help. Then three more. Two lifted the exhausted runners by the legs, while the other two grabbed his arms. Together, the five crossed the finish line, prompting what Lowery called "the loudest cheer I've heard today.
SPORTS
April 19, 2015 | By Jen A. Miller, For The Inquirer
Kim Lewullis and Nikki Watts have a lot of things in common. They live on the same block in the same style house in Collegeville. They both teach at the YMCA. They both have three children. This makes sense because they were born minutes apart. They're twins. They do one more thing together, too: They run. On Monday, they'll run their second Boston Marathon. "We try to do all of our long runs together," said Lewullis, 40, who is older by two minutes. "Knowing that we're in this together provides strength and just peace of mind.
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NEWS
August 5, 2015 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - A plan to help the victims of the Amtrak Train 188 derailment will be stuck in limbo for weeks - maybe months - as Congress heads to its summer break, leaving open the question of how much money could be available for those who suffered devastating injuries and the families of passengers who were killed. At issue is a 1997 law that caps the liability in rail accidents at $200 million, an amount that experts say likely will not be enough to cover the damages for the eight people killed and more than 200 injured in the Philadelphia accident.
NEWS
July 24, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eugene Ross crossed the finish line at his last New York City Marathon when he was 70. Mr. Ross completed the 75-mile, one-day version of his last bicycling event - the Bike MS: City to Shore Ride, a fund-raiser for the National Multiple Sclerosis Society - when he was 84. "He was a better man than I was," said his wife, Christine, who did not compete in either event. "He was not fast," in running or biking, she said, "but he had endurance. " Such effort, she said, "didn't kill him. It made him live until he was 90. " On Sunday, July 19, Mr. Ross died of liver cancer at his home in Ocean City.
NEWS
June 26, 2015 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
BOSTON - Johanna Hantel got up Wednesday morning and went for a half-hour run around Boston Commons. It seemed appropriate. The Malvern woman was in Boston to speak for the runners. Hantel was 10 feet from the first bomb, closer than almost any other runner, when it exploded April 15, 2013, killing three and injuring 254. A police officer later died in a shootout with the bombers. One of the proudest days of Hantel's life was the first time she qualified for Boston. Wednesday was even prouder.
SPORTS
June 1, 2015 | By Jen A. Miller, For The Inquirer
Marathons are going the distance. In 2014, the number of marathon finishers rose to 550,637 - up from 541,000 in 2013, according to the annual marathon report from Running USA, which was issued last week. The number of marathons hit another record, too: In 2014, the United States had more than 1,200 26.2-mile races. "It's encouraging that marathon participation continues to grow and more races than ever are being organized," said Scott Bush, Running USA's director of communications.
SPORTS
May 6, 2015 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
CLIPPERS FORWARD Matt Barnes told Sports Illustrated that Allen Iverson taught him "how NBA players spend money in strip clubs" when they were Sixers teammates. Iverson, according to Barnes, would "throw $30,000, $40,000" at strippers "every time we went. " Iverson's reply was classic. "I don't know what Matt is talking about," he told CBS. "I was rich at 21, so ain't no telling what I may have done, but I know I ain't do that. "   Stellar fight Floyd Mayweather's victory over Manny Pacquiao is out of this world, and we're not talking about the way the fight played out. HBO and NASA have partnered to have the fight made available to the crew of the International Space Station.
NEWS
May 5, 2015
ISSUE | ECONOMY Beggar thy neighbor When Henry Ford started mass production of cars early in the last century, he quickly realized that there was a major problem: Sale prices would be far too excessive for the average buyer. His solution was a stroke of genius. He raised the salaries of his employees to what was a generous amount at that time, $25 per week. In all probability, other employers followed his example. As a result, sales of cars increased dramatically. Today's corporate philosophy is very different.
NEWS
May 1, 2015 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
With two news vans outside his front door and an invitation to appear on Today in New York on Thursday, Michael Rossi is wondering what he did to merit so much attention. "I hope this is Minute 14 of my 15 minutes," the Abington Township father of 9-year-old twins said Wednesday. The frenzy started when he penned a letter to his children's principal at Rydal Elementary School. She had notified him that the three school days his children had missed - April 17, 20, and 21 - so they could watch him run the Boston Marathon and spend time in the Boston area constituted unexcused absences.
NEWS
April 23, 2015 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
WHEN 40,000 runners gallop 10 miles down Broad Street on May 3, the sweatiest guy in Philly could be Jim Marino, who has been the Blue Cross Broad Street Run's race director for 18 of his 36 years with the Parks and Recreation Department. Marino will be nervously pacing the jam-packed finish line at the Philadelphia Navy Yard, where bomb-sniffing dogs and hundreds of uniformed law-enforcement officers will patrol the huge kids' play area and family picnic grounds with the intensity of combat veterans.
SPORTS
April 19, 2015 | By Jen A. Miller, For The Inquirer
Kim Lewullis and Nikki Watts have a lot of things in common. They live on the same block in the same style house in Collegeville. They both teach at the YMCA. They both have three children. This makes sense because they were born minutes apart. They're twins. They do one more thing together, too: They run. On Monday, they'll run their second Boston Marathon. "We try to do all of our long runs together," said Lewullis, 40, who is older by two minutes. "Knowing that we're in this together provides strength and just peace of mind.
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