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NEWS
February 3, 2005 | By Jeff Gammage INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia and Boston have been rivals for about as long as they've existed, the competition extending from Quaker vs. Puritan to McNabb vs. Brady. But here's all you really need to know about the differences between the two cities: People here smell better. On the other hand, people there care about the fates of foreign nations. Philadelphians think it's important in life to be well-insured. Bostonians think it's important to look young. We like to watch children's TV shows.
NEWS
July 27, 2004 | By Marcia Gelbart INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Urged to stay away from downtown during the frenzy of the Democratic National Convention, Bostonians did precisely that yesterday. "It's like a ghost town, like there was a mass exodus," said Laura McNally, a waitress at the Harp Irish Pub, located right across from the FleetCenter and separated from it by tall metal barricades. At noon yesterday, instead of serving lunch to her regular dozens of office and construction workers, McNally found herself outside smoking a cigarette, watching the out-of-towners amble by. The same was true at the 5 North Square Italian restaurant in Boston's North End, where lunchtime came and went with just two dishes served, one grilled chicken, one meatball and ziti.
NEWS
January 25, 2005 | By Daniel Rubin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
This is a rivalry that needs reheating. Fresh from savoring victory at the Linc, Shaun Kessler, 20, strutted off the plane and into enemy territory yesterday decked out in Eagles green: Freddie Mitchell's No. 84 jersey. But no one at Logan Airport paid him any attention. This would never happen in Philadelphia, said Kessler, a Boston University student from Cherry Hill. "Eagles fans are crazy. Here, everybody is: 'Been there, done that.' Maybe after an [Eagles] victory in Jacksonville, they'll get mad at me. " Winning is starting to feel automatic here, like summer traffic on the Cape or wicked good fall foliage.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2007 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Any pianist who replaces an artist of the Martha Argerich caliber is likely to see more than the usual number of empty seats abandoned by disappointed ticketholders. Who could compare to Saint Martha? The answer at yesterday afternoon's Boston Symphony Orchestra concert was Yuja Wang, the China-born 20-year-old in her last year at Curtis Institute whose musical presence in recent years has made her an honorary Philadelphian. Though Wang's temperament contrasts rather than compares to Argerich's, the audience was visibly warming to her in the opening minutes of Tchaikovsky's Piano Concerto No. 1: Programs rustled as listeners consulted her biography; a purse rummager halted in mid-rummage.
NEWS
July 7, 2004
N.J. suburbanites' contributions warrant voice In his June 30 commentary, "City's survival depends on all," Greg Downs writes that Philadelphia needs to "develop a governing body that would run a truly regional plan where we can scavenge on other people, like those in New Jersey and Delaware, instead of upon each other. " Perhaps Downs was unaware that those of us who commute to the city from New Jersey already are being scavenged. Maybe he doesn't count our contributions in city wage taxes, not to mention our daily commuter taxes, otherwise known as bridge tolls.
NEWS
February 23, 1996 | By Michael Matza, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As controversies go, this one is purely off the wall. What began as a publicity stunt two weeks ago suddenly has flared up like too much fat on the grill. The announcement by the Palm Restaurant that it would feature caricatures of 200 prominent Bostonians on the walls of its eatery set to open here next month was supposed to build a buzz for the steak-house chain, founded in 1926, with branches in a dozen cities, including Philadelphia. Despite griping by Boston bigwigs who failed to make the cut, the initial hubbub produced a flow of favorable ink, including publication of a list of people who made it, from A to Z. Then the problems started.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2007 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
In January, a promotional stunt for Aqua Teen Hunger Force, the 15-minute-long Dadaist highlight of the Cartoon Network's Adult Swim! lineup, scared the bejesus out of Bostonians when electronic signs with alien characters Ignignokt and Err were mistaken for bombs. In Aqua Teen Hunger Force Colon Movie Film for Theaters, which daringly and surprisingly successfully attempts to hold viewers' interest in the (barely) animated triumvirate of Frylock, Master Shake and Meatwad for six times the length of a normal episode, it's Philadelphians who are terrorized.
BUSINESS
July 22, 1995 | By Nathan Gorenstein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Brahmin, as in "Boston Brahmins. " That's what Bostonians call the people who used to run that town, the early colonists and revolutionaries who became the shippers, traders and whalers of old New England. They also became the bankers, and soon their commercial descendants may include Philadelphia in their grasp. Bank of Boston Corp., which is proposing a merger with Philadelphia's CoreStates Financial Corp., has its roots in 18th century Massachusetts. It was founded in 1784, by merchants tired of dependence on English financiers.
SPORTS
May 25, 1990 | By Les Bowen, Daily News Sports Writer
Odds are, you can get a pretty good bargain on one of those "Stanley Cup's Brewin' in Boston" T-shirts this morning from the Causeway Street vendors. The shirt, very popular a week ago, when Boston's Stanley Cup dream seemed so real, depicts the Cup half-submerged in a bubbling vat, perhaps of baked beans. Last week, it was a badge of honor. Today, after the Edmonton Oilers claimed their fifth Stanley Cup with a 4-1 win over the Bruins last night, the shirt ranks right up there with "Dukakis-Bentsen" bumper stickers on the list of things Bostonians would just as soon put behind them.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 1986 | By Michael Kimmelman, Inquirer Music Critic
As recently as last spring, Sarah Caldwell - much like Calaf answering the riddles in Puccini's Turandot - seemed to be facing impossible odds. The founder and conductor and director and designer and publicity hound and all-round inspiration behind the remarkable Opera Company of Boston appeared frighteningly near death. And so, in turn, did her creation, which has been in many ways very much a one-woman operation. After Caldwell fell ill with pneumonia in December 1984, the entire 1985 season was canceled, and with each passing month the likelihood of the organization's revival seemed slimmer and slimmer.
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SPORTS
April 25, 2013 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
"Keep on Running, Boston. " That was one of the many signs held by Bostonians and shown during an emotional tribute video on the Wells Fargo Center scoreboard before the Flyers jolted the Bruins, 5-2, on Tuesday night. A sign created by the Flyers organization said: "From One Tough Town to Another. " The video honored the first responders to last week's Boston Marathon bombings and the police work that followed. The Flyers wore "Boston Strong" patches on their jerseys and stickers on their helmets.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2007 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
In January, a promotional stunt for Aqua Teen Hunger Force, the 15-minute-long Dadaist highlight of the Cartoon Network's Adult Swim! lineup, scared the bejesus out of Bostonians when electronic signs with alien characters Ignignokt and Err were mistaken for bombs. In Aqua Teen Hunger Force Colon Movie Film for Theaters, which daringly and surprisingly successfully attempts to hold viewers' interest in the (barely) animated triumvirate of Frylock, Master Shake and Meatwad for six times the length of a normal episode, it's Philadelphians who are terrorized.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2007 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Any pianist who replaces an artist of the Martha Argerich caliber is likely to see more than the usual number of empty seats abandoned by disappointed ticketholders. Who could compare to Saint Martha? The answer at yesterday afternoon's Boston Symphony Orchestra concert was Yuja Wang, the China-born 20-year-old in her last year at Curtis Institute whose musical presence in recent years has made her an honorary Philadelphian. Though Wang's temperament contrasts rather than compares to Argerich's, the audience was visibly warming to her in the opening minutes of Tchaikovsky's Piano Concerto No. 1: Programs rustled as listeners consulted her biography; a purse rummager halted in mid-rummage.
NEWS
February 3, 2005 | By Jeff Gammage INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia and Boston have been rivals for about as long as they've existed, the competition extending from Quaker vs. Puritan to McNabb vs. Brady. But here's all you really need to know about the differences between the two cities: People here smell better. On the other hand, people there care about the fates of foreign nations. Philadelphians think it's important in life to be well-insured. Bostonians think it's important to look young. We like to watch children's TV shows.
NEWS
January 25, 2005 | By Daniel Rubin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
This is a rivalry that needs reheating. Fresh from savoring victory at the Linc, Shaun Kessler, 20, strutted off the plane and into enemy territory yesterday decked out in Eagles green: Freddie Mitchell's No. 84 jersey. But no one at Logan Airport paid him any attention. This would never happen in Philadelphia, said Kessler, a Boston University student from Cherry Hill. "Eagles fans are crazy. Here, everybody is: 'Been there, done that.' Maybe after an [Eagles] victory in Jacksonville, they'll get mad at me. " Winning is starting to feel automatic here, like summer traffic on the Cape or wicked good fall foliage.
NEWS
July 27, 2004 | By Marcia Gelbart INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Urged to stay away from downtown during the frenzy of the Democratic National Convention, Bostonians did precisely that yesterday. "It's like a ghost town, like there was a mass exodus," said Laura McNally, a waitress at the Harp Irish Pub, located right across from the FleetCenter and separated from it by tall metal barricades. At noon yesterday, instead of serving lunch to her regular dozens of office and construction workers, McNally found herself outside smoking a cigarette, watching the out-of-towners amble by. The same was true at the 5 North Square Italian restaurant in Boston's North End, where lunchtime came and went with just two dishes served, one grilled chicken, one meatball and ziti.
NEWS
July 7, 2004
N.J. suburbanites' contributions warrant voice In his June 30 commentary, "City's survival depends on all," Greg Downs writes that Philadelphia needs to "develop a governing body that would run a truly regional plan where we can scavenge on other people, like those in New Jersey and Delaware, instead of upon each other. " Perhaps Downs was unaware that those of us who commute to the city from New Jersey already are being scavenged. Maybe he doesn't count our contributions in city wage taxes, not to mention our daily commuter taxes, otherwise known as bridge tolls.
NEWS
December 3, 2000 | By Robert Zausner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A rare and rowdy weekend hearing before City Council yesterday drew some unusual opponents to the billion-dollar deal for new sports stadiums in the city - including two Boston officials and former Eagles owner Leonard Tose. Some of them faced loud boos and jeers from about 150 building-trades members who packed Council chambers and draped union banners from the marble balconies. The workers see the projects as years of future paychecks. The session got so revved up at times that Council President Anna C. Verna repeatedly pounded her gavel for quiet and threatened arrests or worse - a recess that, she said, could endanger the projects.
SPORTS
June 2, 2000 | By Jim Salisbury, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After nine games played on grass and dirt in three magnificent ballparks - Enron Field, Dodger Stadium and Pacific Bell Park - the Phillies return to dreary Veterans Stadium and its unsightly, joint-killing artificial turf tonight to begin a three-game interleague series with the Boston Red Sox. There aren't many teams in baseball having more fun than the Red Sox. Save for a crushing, season-ending knee injury suffered by veteran third baseman John...
NEWS
February 23, 1996 | By Michael Matza, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As controversies go, this one is purely off the wall. What began as a publicity stunt two weeks ago suddenly has flared up like too much fat on the grill. The announcement by the Palm Restaurant that it would feature caricatures of 200 prominent Bostonians on the walls of its eatery set to open here next month was supposed to build a buzz for the steak-house chain, founded in 1926, with branches in a dozen cities, including Philadelphia. Despite griping by Boston bigwigs who failed to make the cut, the initial hubbub produced a flow of favorable ink, including publication of a list of people who made it, from A to Z. Then the problems started.
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