CollectionsBotanical Gardens
IN THE NEWS

Botanical Gardens

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 16, 2011 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Maggie Knapp is about as lean and fit as a 50-year-old woman can be. And no wonder: She's spent literally half her life working outdoors at Jenkins Arboretum in Devon, where she's the head gardener. "Working outdoors" sounds as if she's leisurely raking leaves. Knapp does that, yes, but she also splits wood, chases trespassing deer, mans the snow plow and wields a steady chain saw. She prunes, plants, propagates, and weeds - and hauls a yeoman's load of mulch. You can't miss her. Spend even an hour at this 46-acre public garden, and she'll whiz by you in a golf cart, troubleshooting and problem-solving along 1.2 miles of paved walkways.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 1999 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Postal Service is helping to brighten letters with five commemoratives featuring flowers. The stamps will help publicize botanical gardens. A 33-cent stamp was issued Tuesday honoring botanists John Bartram and his son William for their efforts in establishing the nation's oldest botanical gardens, at 54th Street and Lindbergh Boulevard in Southwest Philadelphia. The stamp depicts the Franklinia alatamaha, the Bartrams' most famous discovery, named for their friend Benjamin Franklin.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2012
No need to be shut in during the winter when there are so many gardens and nature centers where your family can enjoy the outdoors while keeping fit and active. Get out and explore! 1 BARTRAM'S GARDEN One of the nation's oldest botanical gardens has 45 acres filled with recreational activities. Admission for some exhibits. 54th Street and Lindbergh Boulevard, 215-729-5281, bartramsgarden.org. 2 SCHUYLKILL ENVIRONMENTAL CENTER Learn about and experience nature at this preserve on the banks of the Schuylkill River.
NEWS
December 15, 1996 | By Pauline Pinard Bogaert, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
If Nancy Morin has her way, there will be a stampede at public gardens. "I want public gardens to be on everyone's itinerary," said the newly appointed executive director of the American Association of Botanical Gardens and Arboreta (AABGA), based at Chanticleer gardens in Wayne since 1991. The trade organization, with 400 member gardens in the United States, Canada, Costa Rica, Australia, and the Cayman, British and U.S. Virgin Islands, includes Kennett Square's Longwood Gardens and Lower Merion's Barnes Foundation Arboretum.
NEWS
December 15, 1996 | By Pauline Pinard Bogaert, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
If Nancy Morin has her way, there will be a stampede at public gardens. "I want public gardens to be on everyone's itinerary," said the newly appointed executive director of the American Association of Botanical Gardens and Arboreta (AABGA), based at Chanticleer gardens in Wayne since 1991. The trade organization, with 400 member gardens in the United States, Canada, Costa Rica, Australia, and the Cayman, British and U.S. Virgin Islands, includes Kennett Square's Longwood Gardens and Lower Merion's Barnes Foundation Arboretum.
NEWS
January 5, 1989 | By JAMES J. KILPATRICK
In the midst of all the bad news lately - news of floods, bombs and other such disasters - some relatively good news has appeared on the conservation front. Vigorous efforts are being made to preserve the nation's vanishing wildflowers. These efforts cry out for support. The news is only relatively good news. Last month the Center for Plant Conservation released the findings of a two-year survey. Of the more than 25,000 plants that are native to the United States, an estimated 3,000 are at risk of extinction.
NEWS
July 2, 1989 | By PETER BINZEN
The St. Louis Art Museum is open six days a week and last year attracted 650,000 visitors. It's one of the most heavily used museums in America. Attendance is free - and yet, crows director James Burke, "We're in terrific financial shape. " How does St. Louis do it? Not with mirrors but a tax. The city's art museum, zoo, botanical gardens, history museum and science museum are tax supported. All are located in St. Louis and have free admission. But it isn't just city residents whose real estate taxes support them.
NEWS
April 14, 1994 | By Pheralyn Dove, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
After a bout with the winter-storm blues and a postponement, the Wild Things Art Show, a benefit for Norristown's Elmwood Park Zoo sponsored by the Greater Norristown Art League, is set to take place Saturday and Sunday. Ironically, the idea for the exhibition was to stimulate interest among the organization's 300-plus members during the winter, when artistic activity typically wanes. The art league had planned a trip to the Bronx Zoo and Botanical Gardens and decided to use it as inspiration for the league's first theme show, based primarily on animals and botanicals.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 2013 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
The endangered Camden Children's Garden is one of only a handful of public gardens in the United States dedicated wholly to children. "It has always been the one that others looked to," said Paul Redman, director of Longwood Gardens in Kennett Square, which has indoor and outdoor children's gardens. Virtually all botanical gardens are doing what Longwood has done. They're incorporating areas or features or programming for the younger set because they recognize it's critical to connect kids to nature.
NEWS
January 6, 2012 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mount Cuba Center in Greenville, Del., the horticultural nonprofit dedicated to native plants in the Appalachian Piedmont, is the first among the public gardens in the Philadelphia region, and possibly beyond, to start a distance-learning program. Two wholly online, on-demand classes - six hours on native ferns for $40 and three hours on creating a hummingbird garden for $25 - debuted in November. In January and February, two more classes - moss gardening and meadow plants - will be available via computer or mobile device at www.mtcubacenter.org . This may not sound earthshaking, given that millions of college students and others have been learning online for years.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 2013 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
The endangered Camden Children's Garden is one of only a handful of public gardens in the United States dedicated wholly to children. "It has always been the one that others looked to," said Paul Redman, director of Longwood Gardens in Kennett Square, which has indoor and outdoor children's gardens. Virtually all botanical gardens are doing what Longwood has done. They're incorporating areas or features or programming for the younger set because they recognize it's critical to connect kids to nature.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2012
No need to be shut in during the winter when there are so many gardens and nature centers where your family can enjoy the outdoors while keeping fit and active. Get out and explore! 1 BARTRAM'S GARDEN One of the nation's oldest botanical gardens has 45 acres filled with recreational activities. Admission for some exhibits. 54th Street and Lindbergh Boulevard, 215-729-5281, bartramsgarden.org. 2 SCHUYLKILL ENVIRONMENTAL CENTER Learn about and experience nature at this preserve on the banks of the Schuylkill River.
NEWS
January 6, 2012 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mount Cuba Center in Greenville, Del., the horticultural nonprofit dedicated to native plants in the Appalachian Piedmont, is the first among the public gardens in the Philadelphia region, and possibly beyond, to start a distance-learning program. Two wholly online, on-demand classes - six hours on native ferns for $40 and three hours on creating a hummingbird garden for $25 - debuted in November. In January and February, two more classes - moss gardening and meadow plants - will be available via computer or mobile device at www.mtcubacenter.org . This may not sound earthshaking, given that millions of college students and others have been learning online for years.
NEWS
December 16, 2011 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Maggie Knapp is about as lean and fit as a 50-year-old woman can be. And no wonder: She's spent literally half her life working outdoors at Jenkins Arboretum in Devon, where she's the head gardener. "Working outdoors" sounds as if she's leisurely raking leaves. Knapp does that, yes, but she also splits wood, chases trespassing deer, mans the snow plow and wields a steady chain saw. She prunes, plants, propagates, and weeds - and hauls a yeoman's load of mulch. You can't miss her. Spend even an hour at this 46-acre public garden, and she'll whiz by you in a golf cart, troubleshooting and problem-solving along 1.2 miles of paved walkways.
NEWS
June 4, 2010 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
STATE COLLEGE, Pa. - It's not often you get to watch a new public garden literally rise up out of the mud. But that's happening just down the road from Pennsylvania State University's Beaver Stadium, on the site of a former parking lot for football games. The H.O. Smith Botanic Gardens, on the corner of East Park Avenue and Bigler Road in State College, officially opened in April. As the only public garden in central Pennsylvania, it's now part of the legacy that has established this region of the country as the horticultural center of the United States.
LIVING
August 11, 2006 | By Virginia A. Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
During his nine years as head of the Franklin Park Conservatory in Columbus, Ohio, Paul B. Redman sometimes lay awake at night worrying about making payroll. "We were in survival mode. You know how nonprofits are," he says. Those days are gone for the engaging Redman, who last month became the new executive director of Longwood Gardens in Kennett Square, one of the nation's premier public gardens. At 40, he's the youngest chief executive in its 100-year history. "For something like this to happen, as a horticulturist, as a public-garden administrator, it almost took my breath away," Redman says.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 1999 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Postal Service is helping to brighten letters with five commemoratives featuring flowers. The stamps will help publicize botanical gardens. A 33-cent stamp was issued Tuesday honoring botanists John Bartram and his son William for their efforts in establishing the nation's oldest botanical gardens, at 54th Street and Lindbergh Boulevard in Southwest Philadelphia. The stamp depicts the Franklinia alatamaha, the Bartrams' most famous discovery, named for their friend Benjamin Franklin.
LIVING
December 18, 1998 | By Betsey Hansell, FOR THE INQUIRER
It is easy to get waylaid in the new Brooklyn Botanic Garden's Gardener's Desk Reference. You dip in to find information on a particular topic - butterfly plants for the Northeast, or the last frost date for Philadelphia, say - and three hours later you're deep into a discussion of invasive plants or, believe it or not, the illustrated sex life of a gymnosperm. Janet Marinelli wants this to happen. She planned the 816-page, four-pound tome to be as diverting as possible while it teaches home gardeners to be good gardeners in an ecologically threatened world.
NEWS
September 7, 1998 | By Julie Stoiber, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A few creamy-white blossoms cling to its upper branches, their bright-orange centers barely visible from the ground. There are hints of scarlet in its foliage, a sign that Franklinia alatamaha is about to change into its fall wardrobe. It's a lovely tree, to be sure, but quite honestly, the black-eyed Susans in the bed nearby are more apt to catch the eye of the casual observer. The heck with the casual observer. This tree is all the rage. They're talking about Franklinia at the Harvard University arboretum, at the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew in Surrey, England, and in backyards from Long Island to the Pacific Northwest.
NEWS
December 15, 1996 | By Pauline Pinard Bogaert, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
If Nancy Morin has her way, there will be a stampede at public gardens. "I want public gardens to be on everyone's itinerary," said the newly appointed executive director of the American Association of Botanical Gardens and Arboreta (AABGA), based at Chanticleer gardens in Wayne since 1991. The trade organization, with 400 member gardens in the United States, Canada, Costa Rica, Australia, and the Cayman, British and U.S. Virgin Islands, includes Kennett Square's Longwood Gardens and Lower Merion's Barnes Foundation Arboretum.
1 | 2 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|