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August 16, 2012 | By Carolyn Davis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Remember the days when water merely soothed your body and quenched your thirst? Then came flavored water, vitamin water, diet water, caffeinated water, even glacier water - and with it a drenching wave of blame about the environmental impact of manufacturing, delivering, and trashing plastic bottles. Bottled-water lovers can now counter that criticism with H2O that does good - philanthropic water. There's the Give water brand: Give Hope to benefit a breast cancer organization; Give Love for environmental causes; Give Strength to "fight muscular disorders"; or Give Life to help children.
NEWS
March 25, 2011 | By Shino Yuasa and Tomoko A. Hosaka, Associated Press
TOKYO - Nearly two weeks of rolling blackouts, distribution problems, and contamination fears prompted by a leaking, tsunami-damaged nuclear plant have left shelves stripped bare of some basic necessities in stores across Tokyo. Some people are even turning to the city's ubiquitous vending machines to find increasingly scarce bottles of water. At the source of the anxiety - the overheated, radiation-leaking nuclear plant - there was yet another setback Thursday as two workers were injured when they stepped into radiation-contaminated water.
NEWS
August 31, 2004 | By Virginia A. Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Most people choose bottled spring water for its purity and taste. But that clear plastic container with the cool, bubbly scenes on the front can have a little-known downside inside: no fluoride, the chemical credited with causing a dramatic drop in cavities in the United States over the last half-century, especially among children. Who knew? As sales of nonfluoridated bottled water continue to climb, more dentists are urging parents and patients to seek out the few brands that have added fluoride.
FOOD
August 31, 1994 | by Rick Selvin, Daily News Staff Writer
It's water with a twist. No, not a twist of lemon or lime - a twist of your wrist. Flip a quarter into a vending machine, fill the container you brought, and walk away with a gallon of filtered water. If you're a water purist, but hate paying 69 cents to $1 or more for bottled water, you might consider joining the growing number of Philadelphians who are getting their H2O from a machine. It works like this: You bring your container to the vending machine, often set up near the door of a supermarket.
FOOD
July 17, 2008 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
For a moment, just a year, maybe two ago, it seemed that a tipping point had been reached: Bottled water wasn't cool anymore; it was uncool. The plastic bottles had taken on the aspect of handheld SUVs - oil hogs to manufacture, to haul (from Fiji, for Pete's sake!), to get rid of. They weren't vessels of glacial purity; they were agents of glaciers' demise. More than that, the soda companies - Coke and Pepsi, who'd seen soft-drink sales soften - had implicitly demonized perfectly safe public tap water that they were then shamed into admitting (in city after city, including Philadelphia)
NEWS
January 25, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
PAULSBORO Days after Paulsboro pleaded for state intervention to deal with a contaminated water supply, the state Department of Environmental Protection has advised residents to use bottled water when feeding children up to age 1. Paulsboro officials were expected to post the information to the borough's website Friday, and to issue a letter from the mayor along with the state guidance through the mail. The borough's Well No. 7, a primary water source, has elevated levels of a certain type of perfluorinated compound (PFC)
NEWS
January 30, 1992 | By Ken Dilanian, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Not because of its clean, fresh taste; the well water at their Lower Salford home is just fine in that department. The family gave up their own water in late September, however, on the advice of the Environmental Protection Agency, which found in July that the Kenyons' well and 41 others in the area were contaminated with boron, a trace element commonly found in laundry detergent. Boron doesn't cause cancer, the EPA says, but has caused "severe testicular atrophy and spermatic cessations" in dogs given a high dosage.
NEWS
March 25, 2011 | Associated Press
TOKYO - Nearly two weeks of rolling blackouts, distribution problems and contamination fears prompted by a leaking, tsunami-damaged nuclear plant have left shelves stripped bare of some basic necessities in stores across Tokyo. Some people are even turning to the city's ubiquitous vending machines to find increasingly scarce bottles of water. At the source of the anxiety - the overheated, radiation-leaking nuclear plant - there was yet another setback yesterday as two workers were injured when they stepped into radiation-contaminated water.
NEWS
April 3, 2013
Independence National Historical Park should embrace the virtues of another priceless public asset with Philadelphia roots: tap water. Last week, the group Corporate Accountability International began urging prominent national parks to stop sales of bottled water within their boundaries on the grounds that "one national treasure (our parks) shouldn't be used to sell another (our water). " The National Park Service lets each of its parks decide whether to ban bottled water, and several have done so. While a few more parks wouldn't make much of a dent in the behemoth bottled-water industry, they could lead the way in encouraging the public to drink the water we already own. Independence National Park is in the right place to promote public water and its accompanying benefits.
NEWS
November 2, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
The free bottled water that has been offered for months in Paulsboro in response to a contaminant in the water supply will come to an end Saturday. The discontinuation follows a letter from the state Department of Environmental Protection to the borough Water Department last month lifting a water advisory. The department "does not believe it is necessary to continue the restriction on the consumption of drinking water in Paulsboro," said the Oct. 3 letter from Fred Sickels, director of the DEP's Division of Water Supply and Geoscience.
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NEWS
June 20, 2016 | By Justine McDaniel and Laura McCrystal, Staff Writers
When the planes burned, the kids would come out. Hope Grosse and her siblings would run down their Warminster street and rubberneck amid shrieking sirens. They would watch Navy firefighters shoot a dense white foam from hoses, smothering the flames that leapt up from the fenced-off lot. When the blackened plane was cool, the children would climb the fence and jump into the burned-out cockpit, pretending to be pilots, Grosse recounted. The plane, and the field where the Navy conducted drills, was also a playground for the Kirk Road kids back in the 1970s and '80s.
NEWS
May 26, 2016 | By Justine McDaniel, Staff Writer
Less than a week after new federal guidelines effectively doubled the number of contaminated public water wells near the former naval air bases at Willow Grove and Warminster, residents lined up out the door for an open house with environmental and military officials. "What are they going to do? How bad is it?" asked Sherri Meier, 50, of Warminster, who said she did not want to drink tap water even though the public water supply has been deemed safe. For some among those who packed the room at the Horsham Township Community Center and roamed among the information tables, answers were wanting.
NEWS
May 21, 2016 | By Laura McCrystal, STAFF WRITER lmccrystal@phillynews.com 610-313-8116 @Lmccrystal
State officials on Thursday began offering free bottled water to people who live near the former naval air stations in Montgomery and Bucks Counties, which are blamed for contaminating public drinking wells. The distribution of as many as two cases per day to residents in Warminster, Warrington, and Horsham Townships is a "precautionary action," Gov. Wolf said in a statement announcing the initiative. It occurred on the same day that federal officials released new guidelines that set a lower bar for the level of acceptable water contamination than what has been used as the standard in Horsham and Warminster.
NEWS
April 10, 2016 | By Kathy Boccella, Staff Writer
New water tests at a Lower Merion school showed a cafeteria faucet suspected of having elevated lead levels now registers at an acceptable rate - but also found possible contaminants in a drinking fountain and a water line. The result of the drinking fountain test at Penn Wynne Elementary were at the Environmental Protection Agency's "action level," while the basement water line was near the action level, according to school officials. In a letter to parents Thursday informing them of the test results, principal Shawn Bernatowicz said action-level readings are not necessarily a public-health concern, according to the EPA, but could require more testing and monitoring at the 600-student school.
NEWS
October 25, 2015 | By Jack Tomczuk, Inquirer Staff Writer
Runners, cyclists, or just people enjoying a stroll or taking their dog for a walk along the Schuylkill River Trail have just one water faucet available to them north of Boathouse Row, and that one is way up there, near the Strawberry Mansion Bridge. That's about to change. The Philadelphia Water Department announced Friday that next spring, it will install four water stations on that popular stretch on the east side of the river, from Boathouse Row to East Falls. And these will not be your typical water fountains: They will be high-tech affairs, even if they will only dispense tap. The water stations will hold a traditional fountain, two spigots for refilling water bottles, and a bowl at ground level for pets.
NEWS
June 7, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
A team of sixth graders in Chester County is to go up against 19 other teams this month in a national competition that asks students to use science, technology, engineering, and math to solve problems in their communities. The three East Vincent Township students, who studied the quality and taste of their school's drinking water, are the only Pennsylvania students in the national contest. The other national finalists in the Northeastern United States are from Massachusetts, New York, and Virginia.
NEWS
February 26, 2015 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Navy could be paying upwards of $12 million to filter contaminated drinking water around former military bases in Montgomery and Bucks Counties. Elevated levels of perflourinated compounds, which have been linked to cancer and reproductive issues, were found last year in several drinking water wells in Horsham, Warrington, and Warminster. At an open house in Horsham Wednesday, local officials, and Navy and Environmental Protection Agency representatives said they are making progress on fixing the problem.
NEWS
November 2, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
The free bottled water that has been offered for months in Paulsboro in response to a contaminant in the water supply will come to an end Saturday. The discontinuation follows a letter from the state Department of Environmental Protection to the borough Water Department last month lifting a water advisory. The department "does not believe it is necessary to continue the restriction on the consumption of drinking water in Paulsboro," said the Oct. 3 letter from Fred Sickels, director of the DEP's Division of Water Supply and Geoscience.
NEWS
July 10, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
The water contamination that has triggered the shutdown of five public water wells in Gloucester County has been found at even higher levels in several private wells. Tests commissioned by the company believed responsible for the spread of perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) show that some private wells in West Deptford used for drinking water have concentrations of the chemical higher than what was found in Paulsboro's public supply. A state Department of Environmental Protection report has described Paulsboro's levels as "higher than reported elsewhere in the world" in drinking water studies.
NEWS
May 17, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
A West Deptford plastics company has agreed to test a number of private wells as officials investigate contamination that has prompted scrutiny at all levels of government. Solvay Specialty Polymers, headquartered on Leonard Lane, said Thursday that it would test at least 90 wells in the township and in East Greenwich to determine the spread of perfluorinated compounds (PFCs), specifically perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA). Residents whose wells will be tested can receive free, delivered bottled water from the company, because the testing "may generate concern," Solvay said.
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