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Bottled Water

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August 16, 2012 | By Carolyn Davis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Remember the days when water merely soothed your body and quenched your thirst? Then came flavored water, vitamin water, diet water, caffeinated water, even glacier water - and with it a drenching wave of blame about the environmental impact of manufacturing, delivering, and trashing plastic bottles. Bottled-water lovers can now counter that criticism with H2O that does good - philanthropic water. There's the Give water brand: Give Hope to benefit a breast cancer organization; Give Love for environmental causes; Give Strength to "fight muscular disorders"; or Give Life to help children.
NEWS
March 25, 2011 | By Shino Yuasa and Tomoko A. Hosaka, Associated Press
TOKYO - Nearly two weeks of rolling blackouts, distribution problems, and contamination fears prompted by a leaking, tsunami-damaged nuclear plant have left shelves stripped bare of some basic necessities in stores across Tokyo. Some people are even turning to the city's ubiquitous vending machines to find increasingly scarce bottles of water. At the source of the anxiety - the overheated, radiation-leaking nuclear plant - there was yet another setback Thursday as two workers were injured when they stepped into radiation-contaminated water.
NEWS
August 31, 2004 | By Virginia A. Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Most people choose bottled spring water for its purity and taste. But that clear plastic container with the cool, bubbly scenes on the front can have a little-known downside inside: no fluoride, the chemical credited with causing a dramatic drop in cavities in the United States over the last half-century, especially among children. Who knew? As sales of nonfluoridated bottled water continue to climb, more dentists are urging parents and patients to seek out the few brands that have added fluoride.
FOOD
August 31, 1994 | by Rick Selvin, Daily News Staff Writer
It's water with a twist. No, not a twist of lemon or lime - a twist of your wrist. Flip a quarter into a vending machine, fill the container you brought, and walk away with a gallon of filtered water. If you're a water purist, but hate paying 69 cents to $1 or more for bottled water, you might consider joining the growing number of Philadelphians who are getting their H2O from a machine. It works like this: You bring your container to the vending machine, often set up near the door of a supermarket.
NEWS
January 25, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
PAULSBORO Days after Paulsboro pleaded for state intervention to deal with a contaminated water supply, the state Department of Environmental Protection has advised residents to use bottled water when feeding children up to age 1. Paulsboro officials were expected to post the information to the borough's website Friday, and to issue a letter from the mayor along with the state guidance through the mail. The borough's Well No. 7, a primary water source, has elevated levels of a certain type of perfluorinated compound (PFC)
FOOD
July 17, 2008 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
For a moment, just a year, maybe two ago, it seemed that a tipping point had been reached: Bottled water wasn't cool anymore; it was uncool. The plastic bottles had taken on the aspect of handheld SUVs - oil hogs to manufacture, to haul (from Fiji, for Pete's sake!), to get rid of. They weren't vessels of glacial purity; they were agents of glaciers' demise. More than that, the soda companies - Coke and Pepsi, who'd seen soft-drink sales soften - had implicitly demonized perfectly safe public tap water that they were then shamed into admitting (in city after city, including Philadelphia)
NEWS
January 30, 1992 | By Ken Dilanian, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Not because of its clean, fresh taste; the well water at their Lower Salford home is just fine in that department. The family gave up their own water in late September, however, on the advice of the Environmental Protection Agency, which found in July that the Kenyons' well and 41 others in the area were contaminated with boron, a trace element commonly found in laundry detergent. Boron doesn't cause cancer, the EPA says, but has caused "severe testicular atrophy and spermatic cessations" in dogs given a high dosage.
NEWS
March 25, 2011 | Associated Press
TOKYO - Nearly two weeks of rolling blackouts, distribution problems and contamination fears prompted by a leaking, tsunami-damaged nuclear plant have left shelves stripped bare of some basic necessities in stores across Tokyo. Some people are even turning to the city's ubiquitous vending machines to find increasingly scarce bottles of water. At the source of the anxiety - the overheated, radiation-leaking nuclear plant - there was yet another setback yesterday as two workers were injured when they stepped into radiation-contaminated water.
NEWS
April 3, 2013
Independence National Historical Park should embrace the virtues of another priceless public asset with Philadelphia roots: tap water. Last week, the group Corporate Accountability International began urging prominent national parks to stop sales of bottled water within their boundaries on the grounds that "one national treasure (our parks) shouldn't be used to sell another (our water). " The National Park Service lets each of its parks decide whether to ban bottled water, and several have done so. While a few more parks wouldn't make much of a dent in the behemoth bottled-water industry, they could lead the way in encouraging the public to drink the water we already own. Independence National Park is in the right place to promote public water and its accompanying benefits.
NEWS
November 4, 2007 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bottled water, once an icon of a healthy lifestyle, has become a pariah, the environmentally incorrect humvee of beverages. In recent months, dissent over the once innocuous bottle of Aquafina or Dasani has grown from a trickle to a tsunami. Not just among enviros who decry the 1.5 million barrels of oil used to make a year's worth of bottles. (Plus more to transport it from, in the case of Tasmanian Rain, the end of the Earth.) Not just among pragmatists who cringe at the absurdity of paying $1.50 for bottled when tap is all but free - a fraction of a cent per gallon in Philadelphia.
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NEWS
April 19, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
PAULSBORO As the borough wrestles with a contamination threat, the hardware store that had been supplying free bottled water to residents relinquished that responsibility this week, leaving it unclear where the water will be available. Weiss True Value manager Phil Weiss said Friday that the store had run out of the bottled water for distribution, and that the family-owned firm asked to end its involvement in the giveaway. The water distribution was interfering with other work, Weiss said, as the store had become "extremely busy" with spring business.
NEWS
February 20, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
PAULSBORO For the first time in months of public concern about Paulsboro's contaminated water supply, state and local officials addressed residents Tuesday night in a packed auditorium at Paulsboro High School. Many residents expressed frustration during the nearly 21/2-hour meeting, and many answers were not immediately available. The borough's water supply has elevated levels of a perfluorinated compound (PFC) known as perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA). There are no state or federal regulations for PFC levels in water, and the health effects of the compounds remain unclear.
NEWS
February 5, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
PAULSBORO A dozen Paulsboro residents have joined in a lawsuit against a West Deptford plastics company over a contaminated water supply. The lawsuit alleges that Solvay Specialty Polymers has failed to protect the borough from perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) stemming from its operations on Leonard Lane. Filed in Superior Court in Gloucester County on Friday, the suit seeks class-action status and argues that Solvay was negligent. The suit claims bodily injury, emotional distress, and property damage on behalf of the plaintiffs.
NEWS
January 25, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
PAULSBORO Days after Paulsboro pleaded for state intervention to deal with a contaminated water supply, the state Department of Environmental Protection has advised residents to use bottled water when feeding children up to age 1. Paulsboro officials were expected to post the information to the borough's website Friday, and to issue a letter from the mayor along with the state guidance through the mail. The borough's Well No. 7, a primary water source, has elevated levels of a certain type of perfluorinated compound (PFC)
NEWS
June 7, 2013 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Question: I have a dry-laid brick patio bordered on three sides by flower beds. Over the years I have noticed that the bricks are turning black on top. This is not from garden soil or mud, and it is not uniform in its coverage. I have thought about scrubbing the bricks with a water-bleach mix, but I am afraid that it will bleach the bricks. What is the black stuff, and how do I get it off without changing brick color? Answer: You can try Oxy-Clean, the oxygenated bleach that we use to clean mildew off 18th-century headstones in our churchyard.
NEWS
April 12, 2013
Idling Guard staff risks readiness The Pentagon's decision to impose budget-driven furloughs on some 53,000 National Guard full-time uniformed staffers - including more than 1,800 in Pennsylvania - threatens Guard training and readiness. Just like regular military personnel, these critical Guard members should be exempt from furloughs, as proposed by U.S. Rep. Steven Palazzo (R., Miss.), Congress' only concurrently serving enlisted member of the National Guard. Even though the Defense Department has reduced the number of furlough days to 14, that's not good enough.
NEWS
April 5, 2013
THIS IS A letter in response to the editorial "Liquid Assets: A bottled-water ban has merit, but it's not crystal clear. " I sincerely congratulate the Daily News for having published an article which so articulately elucidates the problems of allowing national parks to continue to sell bottled water. As the article states, when discussing the issue of the sale of bottled water, there inevitably gets asked the question of whether water should be seen and treated federally as a human right.
NEWS
April 3, 2013
Independence National Historical Park should embrace the virtues of another priceless public asset with Philadelphia roots: tap water. Last week, the group Corporate Accountability International began urging prominent national parks to stop sales of bottled water within their boundaries on the grounds that "one national treasure (our parks) shouldn't be used to sell another (our water). " The National Park Service lets each of its parks decide whether to ban bottled water, and several have done so. While a few more parks wouldn't make much of a dent in the behemoth bottled-water industry, they could lead the way in encouraging the public to drink the water we already own. Independence National Park is in the right place to promote public water and its accompanying benefits.
NEWS
March 29, 2013
SHOULD the National Park Service stop selling bottled water at Independence Park? At first glance, the question may strike some as the height of annoying nanny-state interference - like the citywide ban on foie gras or, even worse, New York Mayor Bloomberg's attempt to ban oversize drinks with sugar in them. (Not to mention Mayor Nutter's failed attempt to impose a tax on sugary drinks that went down the drain a few years ago.) Given the concerns over the health impacts of sugary drinks, banning bottled water might be seen as the action of an evil nanny, one who wants to keep you fat. But a campaign to ban bottled water comes at the behest of environmental and other groups to bring attention to a variety of global water problems and corporate big-footing, and although it's a complex issue, it's worth noting.
NEWS
March 28, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Several environmental and other groups are teaming up Wednesday to ask that Independence National Historical Park, along with several other iconic national parks, stop selling bottled water. If they succeed, visitors will be left with a situation - an absurd one, critics say - where they can buy sodas, juice, and other drinks in plastic bottles. But visitors who want water will have to buy a reusable bottle and fill it at a water station with Philadelphia tap water. The effort is being led by Corporate Accountability International, a nonprofit whose Think Outside the Bottle campaign promotes public water systems.
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