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Bottomless Pit

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NEWS
April 4, 1990
PHILADELPHIA, THE BOTTOMLESS PIT For years taxpayers across the commonwealth have poured their hard-earned tax dollars into Philadelphia and watched with dismay and frustration the city's fiscal woes deepen. Philadelphia stuffs huge chunks of state funds into its gasping maw each year but is never satisfied. It always comes back for more. In this fiscal year, for instance, more than $2.3 billion of our tax dollars were consumed by the City of Brotherly Love for programs and services or 16.5 percent of the General Fund, Lottery Fund and Motor License Fund appropriated by the General Assembly for all of the commonwealth.
NEWS
November 8, 2002
RE GAR Joseph's "The Election, from Albania to Zug": His reference to Elk County was ham-handed attempt at humor: "Both Rendell and Fisher visited, although no one lives there. " Here's a list of some of these nonexistent people: My mother and father, two brothers, their wives and children, numerous cousins, aunts and uncles, friends, teachers, etc. The remark reflects an attitude that presumes anyone west of the Susquehanna is a toothless hillbilly, well-deserving of having his hard-earned money funneled by swindlers like Ed Rendell into the bottomless pit that is Philadelphia's inept city government.
NEWS
February 16, 1986
During the disastrous bread famine in France, Marie Antoinette was purported to have said, "Let them eat cake. " Similarly in our own era, our President shed tears of staged concern for the elderly poor, unemployed youth and the technologically disenfranchised by telling us, as he slashed social programs, "to reach for the stars. " In this contemporized version of the "pie-in-the-sky," is he telling those who live close to the bone or those whose bones have been stripped bare to get lost into that vast void of eschatological space?
NEWS
January 20, 2011
I agree with Harold Jackson that we ought not to celebrate the Civil War ("Commemorate, don't celebrate, Civil War's 150th," Sunday). It was the quintessential American tragedy, leading to the slaughter of about 625,000 Americans. How can we possibly celebrate the Peach Orchard at Gettysburg, the Sunken Road at Antietam, the Bloody Angle at Spotsylvania, an ocean of blood, a bottomless pit of gore? Yet I was taught that the war was really pretty simple. The Northerners wore the white hats, fighting to end slavery, while the Southerners were evil for wanting to enslave people of color.
NEWS
February 15, 1990 | By Kathleen Martin Beans, Special to The Inquirer
Hoping for relief from what they say are dangerous living conditions, residents of Victoria Place have asked Warwick Township for demolition of two partially completed buildings on the site. They also have asked for completion of a road into the townhouse development, which was left unfinished when the developer went bankrupt. Six of the residents, who presented a petition with 16 signatures to the board Monday, told the supervisors that the risk of fire and injury was great for the 14 families living in three of the four completed buildings at Victoria Place, which is off York Road in the middle of town.
SPORTS
March 31, 1997 | by Phil Jasner, Daily News Sports Writer
Allen Iverson needed one point to set the 76ers' rookie scoring record. He wasn't going to get it last night. Not on a sprained left ankle suffered in Friday night's 113-105 victory over the Boston Celtics. Iverson said he rolled over on his ankle during the first half Friday night, but didn't realize the extent of the injury until he woke up Saturday morning. Get well soon, Allen. In the midst of the euphoria of the Sixers' 96-92 victory over the Detroit Pistons, there is suddenly a severe manpower shortage at the point.
NEWS
April 14, 2003 | By Frank Kummer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The parents of Sgt. James Riley awoke on Palm Sunday to renewed hope that their son was alive, prayed in church for it to be true, then returned to their Pennsauken home and watched an Army officer turn up the driveway to tell them that it was. The face of the 31-year-old sergeant had been seen around the world after he became one of the first Americans taken prisoner in the war against Iraq. Athol and Jane Riley began the day at 7 - to an alarm clock set to a news radio station that was reporting seven American POWs had been rescued.
NEWS
June 12, 2007 | By Gail Shister INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Like a Maytag washer, Denis Leary does his best work when he's agitated. No surprise, then, that New York City firefighter Tommy Gavin, Leary's finely drawn character on FX's Rescue Me, is stuck in the spin cycle. He's cranky, clueless, emotionally concussive. And that's on a good day. When Rescue launches its eagerly awaited fourth season tomorrow, we find Gavin, as usual, fidgeting in his own personal hell. "His biggest fear is sitting still," says Leary, 49, also the show's co-creator.
NEWS
September 1, 2000 | By Robert Zausner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Kenneth Bond thought he was picking up a nice extra buck chauffeuring congressmen and their guests around Philadelphia for the Republican National Convention. The retired government worker and decorated Vietnam veteran worked long days - averaging 11 hours. Still, he enjoyed chatting with Rep. Randy "Duke" Cunningham (R., Calif.), whom he drove to a skeet shoot in Bucks County, and with a lobbyist whom he took to play golf at the exclusive Pine Valley Country Club in New Jersey.
NEWS
August 12, 1996 | BY MIKE ROYKO
Try to imagine the nightmarish sight of more than 1 million sad-eyed children - hungry, cold, sick, lonely - all sobbing at the same time. It is not a pretty image. But it is one that this country is going to have to face as a result of President Clinton's promise to sign a bill that will change "welfare as we know it. " At least that is what opponents of the welfare changes insist will happen. These alleged experts say that as a result of the new, tougher welfare law, 1.2 million American children will be flung into poverty.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 10, 2013
Just two weeks ago, John D. McDaniel was a key operative to Philadelphia politicians and, not coincidentally, an assistant managing director for the city - a high-flying position he purportedly carried out at Philadelphia International Airport. Since then, the city ethics board has implicated McDaniel and Councilwoman Blondell Reynolds Brown in misappropriations and misrepresentations of campaign contributions and expenditures; Mayor Nutter has unceremoniously fired McDaniel from his $87,000-a-year city job; and federal authorities have charged him with stealing from the councilwoman's campaign.
NEWS
January 20, 2011
I agree with Harold Jackson that we ought not to celebrate the Civil War ("Commemorate, don't celebrate, Civil War's 150th," Sunday). It was the quintessential American tragedy, leading to the slaughter of about 625,000 Americans. How can we possibly celebrate the Peach Orchard at Gettysburg, the Sunken Road at Antietam, the Bloody Angle at Spotsylvania, an ocean of blood, a bottomless pit of gore? Yet I was taught that the war was really pretty simple. The Northerners wore the white hats, fighting to end slavery, while the Southerners were evil for wanting to enslave people of color.
SPORTS
June 10, 2010 | By Kate Fagan, Inquirer Staff Writer
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - Tim Howard is a conductor. He is the man that watches everything, sees everything; he points towards holes he wants filled, and gestures for shifts that will ensure balance. But Howard, 31, does his orchestrating looking very little like a conductor and more like Bobby Knight, circa 1976 - sometimes forcefully punching air like a boxer in training, other times spitting commands at his defenders. Howard, you might have gathered, is Team USA's starting goalkeeper.
NEWS
June 12, 2007 | By Gail Shister INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Like a Maytag washer, Denis Leary does his best work when he's agitated. No surprise, then, that New York City firefighter Tommy Gavin, Leary's finely drawn character on FX's Rescue Me, is stuck in the spin cycle. He's cranky, clueless, emotionally concussive. And that's on a good day. When Rescue launches its eagerly awaited fourth season tomorrow, we find Gavin, as usual, fidgeting in his own personal hell. "His biggest fear is sitting still," says Leary, 49, also the show's co-creator.
NEWS
April 14, 2003 | By Frank Kummer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The parents of Sgt. James Riley awoke on Palm Sunday to renewed hope that their son was alive, prayed in church for it to be true, then returned to their Pennsauken home and watched an Army officer turn up the driveway to tell them that it was. The face of the 31-year-old sergeant had been seen around the world after he became one of the first Americans taken prisoner in the war against Iraq. Athol and Jane Riley began the day at 7 - to an alarm clock set to a news radio station that was reporting seven American POWs had been rescued.
NEWS
November 8, 2002
RE GAR Joseph's "The Election, from Albania to Zug": His reference to Elk County was ham-handed attempt at humor: "Both Rendell and Fisher visited, although no one lives there. " Here's a list of some of these nonexistent people: My mother and father, two brothers, their wives and children, numerous cousins, aunts and uncles, friends, teachers, etc. The remark reflects an attitude that presumes anyone west of the Susquehanna is a toothless hillbilly, well-deserving of having his hard-earned money funneled by swindlers like Ed Rendell into the bottomless pit that is Philadelphia's inept city government.
NEWS
September 1, 2000 | By Robert Zausner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Kenneth Bond thought he was picking up a nice extra buck chauffeuring congressmen and their guests around Philadelphia for the Republican National Convention. The retired government worker and decorated Vietnam veteran worked long days - averaging 11 hours. Still, he enjoyed chatting with Rep. Randy "Duke" Cunningham (R., Calif.), whom he drove to a skeet shoot in Bucks County, and with a lobbyist whom he took to play golf at the exclusive Pine Valley Country Club in New Jersey.
SPORTS
March 31, 1997 | by Phil Jasner, Daily News Sports Writer
Allen Iverson needed one point to set the 76ers' rookie scoring record. He wasn't going to get it last night. Not on a sprained left ankle suffered in Friday night's 113-105 victory over the Boston Celtics. Iverson said he rolled over on his ankle during the first half Friday night, but didn't realize the extent of the injury until he woke up Saturday morning. Get well soon, Allen. In the midst of the euphoria of the Sixers' 96-92 victory over the Detroit Pistons, there is suddenly a severe manpower shortage at the point.
NEWS
March 1, 1997
NOT ENTITLED TO 'ENTITLEMENT' I am sick of people who emigrate to the USA from other countries, sit on their duffs and collect welfare, Social Security benefits, etc., when they never even put any money in in the first place. Politicians call this money "entitlements. " People born in the USA, like me, won't be able to collect when we retire because the money won't be there for us. These people shouldn't be "entitled" to any of this money because, many times, they aren't U.S. citizens or permanent residents.
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