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SPORTS
May 4, 2012 | DAILY NEWS WIRE REPORTS
HOPING TO CLOSE the book on bounties, the NFL suspended New Orleans Saints defensive captain Jonathan Vilma without pay for all of next season Wednesday and gave shorter bans to three other players for their leading roles in the team's cash-for-hits system that knocked key opponents out of games from 2009-11. Defensive lineman Anthony Hargrove, now with the Green Bay Packers, was suspended for the first half of the 16-game season; Saints defensive end Will Smith was barred for the opening four games; and linebacker Scott Fujita, now with the Cleveland Browns, will miss the first three games of 2012.
NEWS
April 19, 1987 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / MYRNA LUDWIG
Making friends with a baby rabbit is Sean Fast, 2, of Maple Shade. Sean's buddy was among hundreds being sold at Martin's Aquarium and Pet Store in Cherry Hill for Easter today. The store says it usually sells at least 400 bunnies during the Easter season. The price of a Peter cottontail this year? $9.95 and up.
SPORTS
April 17, 2012 | STAFF AND WIRE REPORTS
SAINTS QUARTERBACK Drew Brees, former New Orleans linebacker Scott Fujita and players union head DeMaurice Smith were at the NFL offices in New York Monday discussing the team's bounty program. Brees and Fujita, now with the Browns, are members of the NFLPA's executive committee. Fujita was with the Saints in 2009 when the pay-for-pain bounty pool grew as large as $50,000 and the team won the Super Bowl. NFL commissioner Roger Goodell is expected to soon punish players for their roles in the program that got Saints coach Sean Payton suspended for 2012.
FOOD
October 10, 2014 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
The mission to Montreal has become required eating over the last decade, its smoked-meat-and-poutine soul inspiring a generation of hipster-handcraft chefs from Brooklyn to Philly. But the quest for Québec profond requires a deeper drive into the heart of the province - 21/2 hours northeast to Québec City, where you'll find another metropolis in the midst of its own food revolution. More intimate than Montreal, and more deeply influenced by the historic stone-walled ramparts of its French-Canadian charm, Québec City has been energized in recent years by a generation of young chefs who have brought edgy bistro kitchens that take full advantage of the region's considerable artisan food bounty, from "ice ciders" to raw milk cheese, exceptional produce, and wild game.
SPORTS
March 27, 2012 | BY PAUL DOMOWITCH, Daily News Staff Writer
PALM BEACH, Fla. - The NFL, which already has allowed fans to sit in on Super Bowl Media Day and the predraft scouting combine, gave them yet another up-close-and-personal peek inside the league Monday. Nineteen fans got the opportunity to attend part of the afternoon session at the league meetings at the posh Breakers Resort (we assume they had to wipe their feet on the way in). They spent more than an hour behind closed doors with commissioner Roger Goodell and the league's owners, coaches and other club executives.
SPORTS
October 10, 2012 | Daily News Wire Reports
NFL COMMISSIONER Roger Goodell upheld the suspensions of Jonathan Vilma and Will Smith on Tuesday for their role in the New Orleans Saints bounty scandal and reduced penalties for Scott Fujita and Anthony Hargrove. Vilma will sit out the entire season and Smith's punishment stands at four games. Hargrove, a free agent defensive lineman, will face a two-game suspension once he signs with a team. He originally was hit with eight games, but that was reduced to seven with five games already served.
NEWS
October 17, 1986 | Daily News Wire Services
Arrest a sailor and make $50. That's the message the Navy is sending to the nation's law enforcement officers. Naval authorities don't want just any sailor, however. They're trying to catch some of the estimated 4,000 deserters who remain at large. And they hope the $50-a-head bounty will be an incentive for police to track down AWOL sailors. The Navy also will pay a $25 bonus for every deserter who is dropped off at the nearest naval station. Last week, the Navy sent letters to law enforcement agencies all over the country offering the reward and asking for help catching deserters.
SPORTS
December 11, 1989 | By Tim Kawakami, Daily News Sports Writer
The NFL's decision came down Friday. The full explanation came yesterday, as the very available commissioner popped back into town. Paul Tagliabue ruled that he found no proof that Eagles coach Buddy Ryan put a bounty on kicker Luis Zendejas or any other Cowboy in the infamous Thanksgiving game, as was claimed after Zendejas was knocked down by Eagles linebacker Jessie Small at the start of the second half. Yesterday, Tagliabue - on the day of the Cowboys-Eagles rematch - gave voice to his pronouncement, and said if new evidence comes to light, his decision could be reversed.
FOOD
June 6, 2001 | By Marilynn Marter INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
The Philadelphia Fair Food Project is a nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting small-scale farms throughout the region, in large part by encouraging more use, both public and private, of locally produced foods in the city. The group puts particular emphasis on the production of organically grown foods and the use of ecologically sound, sustainable agricultural growing methods. To further those goals, the Fair Food Project and the Organic Planet Dinner Club will join forces on Sunday to present "A Sustainable Feast" at Cafette, 8136 Ardleigh St., in Chestnut Hill.
SPORTS
June 6, 2012 | Associated Press
An arbitrator ruled Monday that NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell has the authority to discipline New Orleans Saints players for their role in a bounty system. The NFL Players Association challenged Goodell's power to impose penalties for what the league says was a three-year bounty program that targeted specific players. Stephen Burbank, a University of Pennsylvania law professor, took only five days to determine that Goodell has the power to punish the players under the collective bargaining agreement reached last August to end the lockout.
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NEWS
March 28, 2015 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
Five bounty hunters were charged in Camden County after beating and allegedly robbing a suspect they were pursuing, then kidnapping the suspect's teenage acquaintance and holding a knife to his throat, authorities said Thursday. The wild incident unfolded about 8:45 p.m. Wednesday along Briarhill Drive in Chesilhurst. The bounty hunters were watching for Eric L. Webb, 38, of Lindenwold, who was wanted on a drug-charge warrant in Camden County, the county prosecutor's office said. As Webb and the 17-year-old acquaintance stepped out of a car, some of the hunters walked toward them, authorities said.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
A former Marine, Matt Broughton was aware of the irony when he was arrested, for the first time in his life, on Veterans Day. But, with bail set at $200,000, and the prospect of missing Christmas with his daughters, ages 5 and 2, looming, he didn't have time to dwell on it. "I missed Thanksgiving, but I was really wanting to get out for the rest of the holidays," said Broughton, 25, of Warminster, who was charged with burglary. He did a tour in Iraq in 2009-10 and still grapples with anxiety, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder.
SPORTS
November 26, 2014 | By Rich Hofmann, Daily News Staff Writer
YOU TRY to explain to people what it was like, in the days before the coach only talked into a microphone on a podium and the trainer was forbidden to answer questions about injuries and every interaction with, well, with everybody on the team had a chance to be videotaped by another media outlet or by the team itself. It was a time when newspaper reporters had only one deadline a day, and when news that you broke stayed broken for 24 hours, not until the next tweet. It was a time when Buddy Ryan was the Eagles' head coach, and when a game wasn't memorable if it didn't have a nickname.
FOOD
October 10, 2014 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
The mission to Montreal has become required eating over the last decade, its smoked-meat-and-poutine soul inspiring a generation of hipster-handcraft chefs from Brooklyn to Philly. But the quest for Québec profond requires a deeper drive into the heart of the province - 21/2 hours northeast to Québec City, where you'll find another metropolis in the midst of its own food revolution. More intimate than Montreal, and more deeply influenced by the historic stone-walled ramparts of its French-Canadian charm, Québec City has been energized in recent years by a generation of young chefs who have brought edgy bistro kitchens that take full advantage of the region's considerable artisan food bounty, from "ice ciders" to raw milk cheese, exceptional produce, and wild game.
NEWS
August 8, 2014 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writer zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
WITH LITTLE to go on three days after a Northeast Philadelphia woman was found strangled in Pennypack Park, police last night announced an increased reward for information leading to her killer. In addition to the city's standing $20,000 reward for a tip leading to an arrest and conviction in any homicide, Fraternal Order of Police Lodge No. 5 kicked in $10,000, and Philadelphia Federal Credit Union added $5,000 for information in the case, bringing the total reward to $35,000. The victim, Constance "Connie" Murray, 46, a wife and mother of two young daughters, left her home about 9 p.m. Monday to go for a jog and never returned.
NEWS
July 13, 2014 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
WEST CAPE MAY - Chef Lucas Manteca is on his farm this weekday morning with a lot of catching up to do. He has named this patch of 10 acres Fincas del Mar - farms of the sea - and that's what it is: unusually fertile soil, tucked in by ocean, the bay, and a canal, and tantalizingly close to the gourmet restaurants spawned by the Shore scene. "I discovered this completely different world that nobody knows exists," he says. "It's like the Riviera, almost. Italy. I would say Mediterranean.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2014 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
William H. Frederick Jr., known as Bill, is 88 now, a little stooped and hard of hearing, a far hike down the road from his 1948 Swarthmore College graduation. But this accomplished garden designer, nurseryman, and author remains an icon in plant circles. Since the 1960s, he has shared his expertise and extraordinary 17-acre garden outside Wilmington with 33 interns and thousands of professional gardeners, landscape architects, and students from around the world. Now, there's a good deed that cannot trump Frederick's half-century of knowledge-sharing, but certainly tops it off nicely: an $800,000 gift to Scott Arboretum, which covers 300 acres of Swarthmore's 450-acre campus.
NEWS
June 13, 2014
SUMMERTIME, and goin' vegan is easy. Call it what you may, easing into eating more plants and fewer animal products is simple and fun in summer, with a bounty of fresh fruits and vegetables, and weather conducive to adventure. Combining these, summer vegan festivals offer everybody a chance to try new and different vegan foods while maybe learning something about the philosophy. * Saturday sees the debut of the Humane League's Philly VegFest , from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at The Shambles in the Headhouse Square District.
NEWS
June 2, 2014 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
We asked readers if they could improve upon the Philadelphia Convention and Visitors Bureau slogan "PHL: Here for the Making," which lost us at PHL. And they could. They did. Contrary to perception, suggestions swelled with love, pride, and more love. Readers submitted drawings, photos, poems, jingles, a veritable coffeehouse of regional cheer. The enterprise was notable for its altruism. We offered no prizes, not even beer. And no one asked. (OK, a couple of people asked.) The lack of remuneration was intentional: To show the PHLCVB (which needs help with that acronym)
NEWS
February 9, 2014 | By Al Haas, For The Inquirer
The Mercedes-Benz E-Class is like a classic gray suit. It's a safe, conservative choice that looks good no matter where you travel. That might explain not just its popularity but also why Mercedes-Benz offers a full range of body styles including a coupe, cabriolet, sedan, and wagon with all-wheel drive. And the variety doesn't stop there. There's a sizable choice of power trains, as well. In an unusual move, the least expensive E-Class sedan, the E250 BlueTEC - with a $51,400 base price - has a 195-horsepower 2.1-liter four-cylinder twin-turbocharged diesel engine.
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