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Bourbon Street

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NEWS
August 16, 1988 | By JOHN M. BAER, Daily News Staff Writer
The attorney general of the United States put on a pith helmet. Good thing, because it's a jungle down here. Perhaps it's the heat and humidity. Or maybe it's all the jazz and booze. Whatever it is, it seems to have taken over the Pennsylvania delegation to the Republican National Convention. The delegation was invited to a "Pennsylvania is Bush Country" rally (hence the pith helmets) at the Hilton Hotel here yesterday. It was an event as raucous, rowdy and uneven as historic Bourbon Street.
NEWS
August 17, 1988 | By Tanya Barrientos, Inquirer Convention Bureau
There is at least one group of Republicans in The Big Easy this week that is, quite frankly, not amused by this city's high tolerance for low entertainment. Others may enjoy the general debauchery, but not them, thank you. They are the evangelicals. The self-proclaimed born-again Christian delegates are here to make sure the Republican Party keeps its moral standards high. And that, they say, is quite a task in New Orleans, where the city's most famous street - Bourbon Street - serves up live orgies, topless dancers and transvestite reviews alongside stiff drinks.
NEWS
August 27, 1987 | By David Hiltbrand, Special to The Inquirer
Park yourself on Bourbon Street long enough, and the whole world will eventually parade itself before your eyes. So they say down in New Orleans. And Mason Ruffner is inclined to agree. For many years, the guitarist-singer played on Bourbon Street in a dive called the 544 Club, where the sun don't shine and the clientele comes to do some serious drinking. Eventually, he made a short move down the street and up in the world to the Old Absinthe House. Colorful would be a polite description of the "A Bar," as that establishment is known locally.
NEWS
May 29, 1987 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / GERALD S. WILLIAMS
Laissez Les Bons Temps Rouler - Let the Good Times Roll! That was the theme yesterday as the Second Annual Jambalaya Jam began at the Great Plaza at Penn's Landing. For four days, the plaza is being turned into a Cajun playground for sizzle and sass as Bourbon Street meets Two Street for a celebration of New Orleans food and music. The fun continues today through Sunday from noon to 10 p.m.
SPORTS
January 23, 1986 | By Timothy Dwyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
At first, only a few people noticed "The Refrigerator" walking along Bourbon Street. That's understandable. There are sites on Bourbon Street that would turn your eyeballs inside out, so a mere walking Refrigerator could easily blend in. Then The Refrigerator stopped walking. "Hey man, there's The Fridge," said one man. "Hey, Fridge. " And pretty soon a wave of murmurs rolled down Bourbon Street, passing along the message: "Refrigerator. Refrigerator. " A crowd began to gather.
NEWS
January 16, 2002 | By Frank DiCicco
When I think of Mardi Gras, I think of New Orleans. I think of colorful beads, historic Bourbon Street, grandiose parades, exotic floats, and dazzling costumes. I think of the "biggest free show on earth. " I think of a city-sponsored event - an event that most people enjoy and where few people get hurt. I don't think of South Street in Philadelphia. Mardi Gras on South Street perverts the great New Orleans tradition. It's not supported by the city or by the local business district.
SPORTS
November 3, 2012 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
Sometime in the hazy evening on Monday, long after the bar crawls on Saturday and Sunday nights, beyond the pep rallies in the afternoon and the tailgate party in Lafayette Square, that's when the rented high school band will break into "The Philadelphia Eagles Victory Song" and thousands of fans will fall into line - or just fall - as the parade to the Superdome begins and they attempt to navigate their own road to victory. "It could be a little loud. It might be a little obnoxious, but that's kind of par for the course," said Craig "Qwimby" Chenosky, founder of the Green Legion, one of several Philadelphia-area businesses that specialize in travel packages for Eagles fans who want to take their special act to other cities.
NEWS
January 16, 2002 | By FRANK DiCICCO
WHEN I THINK of Mardi Gras, I think of New Orleans, colorful beads, Bourbon Street, grand parades, exotic floats and dazzling costumes. I think of a city-sponsored event that most people enjoy and where few people get hurt. I don't think of South Street in Philadelphia. "Mardi Gras on South Street" perverts this tradition. It's not supported by the city or by the local business district. It's unsafe and out of control. But some businesses on South Street continue to promote this event to make money.
NEWS
January 11, 2002
WHILE visiting friends at 3rd and Pine last year, I walked over to South Street to observe the Fat Tuesday celebration. As I entered at 4th and South, I encountered several fights, urinating and angry drunkenness within 50 feet of entering a clogged South Street. At this point, I thought it would be wise to turn around and get out of there. In this brief moment, I observed: Barricades placed on both sides of the street to manage the crowd and cars on the street. This caused a logjam of people, and, when drunks get confined, fighting usually erupts.
SPORTS
January 22, 1986 | By Timothy Dwyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Something seems terribly wrong here. Has the world been turned upside down? Has Mike Schmidt taken a cut in pay? Has Moses Malone stopped rebounding? Something is definitely wrong. Jim McMahon doesn't want to party. In New Orleans for a week and he doesn't want to boogie on Bourbon Street. Uh oh. If there is one player among the Patriots and Bears who fits in with life in New Orleans, it's Jim McMahon. He's perfect for New Orleans. Who would you rather spend a night on Bourbon Street with?
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SPORTS
November 3, 2012 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
Sometime in the hazy evening on Monday, long after the bar crawls on Saturday and Sunday nights, beyond the pep rallies in the afternoon and the tailgate party in Lafayette Square, that's when the rented high school band will break into "The Philadelphia Eagles Victory Song" and thousands of fans will fall into line - or just fall - as the parade to the Superdome begins and they attempt to navigate their own road to victory. "It could be a little loud. It might be a little obnoxious, but that's kind of par for the course," said Craig "Qwimby" Chenosky, founder of the Green Legion, one of several Philadelphia-area businesses that specialize in travel packages for Eagles fans who want to take their special act to other cities.
TRAVEL
August 12, 2012 | By Si Liberman, For The Inquirer
NEW ORLEANS - "You've heard the song, 'I Left My Heart in San Francisco,' " said the bus tour guide. "Well, here in New Orleans is where you'll find your heart. " And that we did this summer after checking into the recently renovated 254-room Hyatt French Quarter Hotel and touring the Ninth Ward, devastated by Hurricane Katrina, and other neighborhoods before hitting some of the city's most popular restaurants. Seeing an increasing number of unique small new homes popping up on empty lots where pre-Katrina buildings once stood was encouraging.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2012 | By Howard Gensler
Bruce Springsteen has been added to this year's New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival lineup. Springsteen and the Clarence Clemons -less E Street Band will perform on April 29. It'll be Springsteen's first Jazz Fest appearance since 2006, when he took the stage with his Seeger Sessions project less than a year after Hurricane Katrina. Eddie Vedder and rapper Mystikal also have been added. They join a previously announced roster that includes the Eagles , a reunion of the Beach Boys , Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers , Foo Fighters , Zac Brown Band and John Mayer , the Neville Brothers , Al Green and My Morning Jacket . Hundreds of acts will perform on roughly a dozen stages over two weekends from April 27 to May 6. * If you can't make it to the Big Easy, the Boss and his band will perform two shows at the Wells Fargo Center on March 28 and 29, as part of the first U.S. leg of the 2012 "Wrecking Ball" World Tour.
NEWS
September 28, 2005 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As Hurricane Katrina ravaged New Orleans, Gwynedd-Mercy College sociology professor Wade Luquet - a native of the city - feared for members of his family still living there. The Montgomery County college professor had another thought, too: "My gosh. It took my classroom away. I can't do my course. " Since 2003, Luquet has taught "The History and Culture of New Orleans," a three-credit spring-semester course that began on the bucolic Gwynedd Valley campus with required readings such as A Streetcar Named Desire and A Confederacy of Dunces and lessons on the city's geography, many linguistic accents, and history.
NEWS
January 16, 2002 | By FRANK DiCICCO
WHEN I THINK of Mardi Gras, I think of New Orleans, colorful beads, Bourbon Street, grand parades, exotic floats and dazzling costumes. I think of a city-sponsored event that most people enjoy and where few people get hurt. I don't think of South Street in Philadelphia. "Mardi Gras on South Street" perverts this tradition. It's not supported by the city or by the local business district. It's unsafe and out of control. But some businesses on South Street continue to promote this event to make money.
NEWS
January 16, 2002 | By Frank DiCicco
When I think of Mardi Gras, I think of New Orleans. I think of colorful beads, historic Bourbon Street, grandiose parades, exotic floats, and dazzling costumes. I think of the "biggest free show on earth. " I think of a city-sponsored event - an event that most people enjoy and where few people get hurt. I don't think of South Street in Philadelphia. Mardi Gras on South Street perverts the great New Orleans tradition. It's not supported by the city or by the local business district.
NEWS
January 11, 2002
WHILE visiting friends at 3rd and Pine last year, I walked over to South Street to observe the Fat Tuesday celebration. As I entered at 4th and South, I encountered several fights, urinating and angry drunkenness within 50 feet of entering a clogged South Street. At this point, I thought it would be wise to turn around and get out of there. In this brief moment, I observed: Barricades placed on both sides of the street to manage the crowd and cars on the street. This caused a logjam of people, and, when drunks get confined, fighting usually erupts.
NEWS
February 13, 2000 | By Alan Behr, FOR THE INQUIRER
We were walking down Bourbon Street when Murray exclaimed, "I'm virile! I'm virile!" He did it sheepishly, for old time's sake, because we both remembered the night, when we were in high school, that he'd had too much to drink, eaten too many raw oysters (natural Viagra, by reputation), and then had gone leaping down Bourbon Street, past the strip joints and jazz clubs, dodging the corncobs and empty beer and hurricane glasses in the gutter, shouting the glories of his masculinity.
SPORTS
January 24, 1997 | By Bob Ford, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The blue poodle had obviously done this before. The dog leaped delicately and precisely through the hoop held by its handler, moving steadily down Bourbon Street without once dislodging its round sunglasses. On an evening in the French Quarter this week, the poodle's expertise drew barely a glance from passersby and passers-out gathered for unofficial Super Bowl revelry in America's official red-light district. Had Walt Disney gone bad, become a lost boy himself, he might have created something like Bourbon Street, a quaint architectural hodgepodge dedicated to excess of all sorts.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 1993 | By Jack Lloyd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sam Butera has not, of course, been around forever. It just seems that way to those with long memories. Actually, Butera has been entertaining for only 51 years. "I don't remember ever doing anything else or wanting to do anything else," he said. "I started when I was 14. " That was in his native New Orleans, where Butera began playing the saxophone at the age of 7. He remembers his first paying job. "Playing for strippers on Bourbon Street," Butera said. "Bourbon Street has changed a lot since then, but then things change.
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