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Bowling Alley

NEWS
August 20, 1986 | By Cheryl Baisden, Special to The Inquirer
Two Stratford businessmen could become the owners of a borough street if the Stratford Borough Council approves a proposal introduced by Councilwoman Anne Griffin last week. Under the recommendation, the council would relinquish ownership of Wellington Avenue, a 175-foot road intersecting the White Horse Pike, and would divide ownership between the La Martiniqui bowling alley and Tomkinson's service station. The proposal, made at a meeting Aug. 12, would turn the road into a private-access and parking area that would be maintained by the two businesses.
NEWS
February 22, 1995 | By Richard Berkowitz, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A proposal to build an 80-lane, 80,500-square-foot bowling center in the township appears to have landed in the gutter. The Township Commissioners on Monday night balked at developer John W. Harper's proposal, saying his plan to build an access road through a public park was unacceptable. Their discouraging words came after Harper's detailed explanation of the project, which he said would create the largest bowling alley on the East Coast. Besides bowling, Harper said he would like to create an "entire family entertainment center," including a restaurant, video arcade, meeting rooms, children's play area and party rooms.
NEWS
October 4, 1991
IF WE ALL WORK TOGETHER Top Ten Biosphere Rules from "The Chronicle with Roy Bragg," Houston: 10. Only biodegradable aerosol cans can be burned in daily trash fire. 9. No loud music or dancing because it bothers the tenants in the biosphere downstairs. 8. Suspicious behavior in the barnyard won't be tolerated. 7. Biospherans can't press naked butts against glass walls. 6. No sharp objects allowed near the Bio-Still. 5. No experimenting on the old guy. 4. Breakfast at 8, lunch at 12, supper at 6, and at 9, it's Miller Time.
NEWS
November 26, 1987 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
Great news, real estate fans. You now have a chance to become the proud owner of 2.8 acres of exclusive Caln Township property, situated along the north side of Lincoln Highway. More exciting, the land contains a building that's a do-it-yourselfer's dream: a burned-out bowling alley. Yes, you guessed it. It's Ingleside Lanes, the bowlers' haven you saw on television and in the newspaper when most of it burned to the ground. The Chester County Sheriff's Office is holding this special, one-time-only sale on Dec. 18 at the courthouse.
SPORTS
February 26, 2002 | Hunterdon County records, Daily News Wire Services
Name: Who Knew? Estate. Where: Alexandria Township, N.J., about 30 miles northwest of Trenton. Rooms: 40. Square feet: 30,000. Acres: 65. Acquired: Land purchased for $225,000 in 1995. Construction: Built by Williams and his father, E.J. Assessed value: Approximiately $3.7 million. Amenities: Bowling alley, movie theater, go-kart track, par-3 golf hole, horse stable, indoor and outdoor pools, basketball court and a gym. Memories: Two rooms are shrines dedicated to his two sisters who died of AIDS.
SPORTS
March 12, 2007 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
A man was arrested and charged with aggravated assault after police said he threatened troubled Titans cornerback Adam "Pacman" Jones with a knife at a Franklin, Tenn., bowling alley Friday night. Franklin Police Detective Stephanie Cisco told the Tennessean newspaper that Jones was bowling at the Franklin Family Entertainment Center when Clayton Smith, 33, instigated the confrontation, brandishing a small pocket knife. Smith "threatened to beat up Mr. Jones and to use the knife on him," Cisco said.
NEWS
May 27, 1990 | By Douglas A. Campbell, Inquirer Staff Writer
One firefighter was hospitalized and a former Beverly City bowling alley was destroyed yesterday morning by a three-alarm fire that police said forced the evacuation of about 20 neighbors. The cause of the fire, discovered at 9:23 a.m. by an off-duty firefighter, was under investigation by the Burlington County fire marshal. Sean Rahilly, 19, of Edgewater Park, was admitted to Zurbrugg Hospital in Riverside in stable condition suffering from smoke inhalation, a hospital official said.
NEWS
August 29, 1991 | By Matt Freeman, Special to The Inquirer
The script called for hoods, so Jim Hanna went into the bowling-alley bathroom, slicked back his hair with water, and came out looking like a hood. It was, he hoped, a look made for the movies. Hanna headed over to Carol Ness, owner of Central Casting, a Baltimore- and Washington-based casting company that is rounding up extras for a film titled That Night. The film is an independent production to be distributed by Warner Brothers and scheduled for release sometime next year.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 2000 | By Jonathan Storm, INQUIRER TELEVISION CRITIC
Every year, they come - rousing new series that make the critics cheer. Most years, they also go - overlooked or, worse, rejected by the mass audience that the big networks require. This year's candidate is Ed. It premieres tonight and will air in one of television's notorious "black holes": 8 p.m. Sunday, on NBC. Pummeled by such CBS hits as Murder, She Wrote and Touched By an Angel, NBC last had any semblance of success there in 1984. It was Knight Rider, about a talking car. Touching and original, Ed is the tale of a bowling-alley lawyer, who would prefer that you didn't call him that.
NEWS
April 24, 1988 | By Sergio R. Bustos, Inquirer Staff Writer
Morning, noon and night. Day in and day out. Year after year. They come by the thousands, as if going to Sunday Mass. No, it's not a church, but it does have that kind of following. They bring their family, friends and co-workers, as if it were a picnic. No, it's not a park, but there is plenty of space to stretch out. They shout, cheer, boo and give each other high-fives, as if it were a baseball game. No, it's not Veterans Stadium, but there is usually lots of excitement as well as a little boredom.
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