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Bowling Alley

LIVING
June 17, 2009 | By Barbara Evans Sorid FOR THE INQUIRER
For the love of his father, Jim Teti became a bowler. It started in 2000, when his dad, Al - known as "AT" - was diagnosed with Alzheimer's. Teti volunteered to drive nearly an hour after work every Wednesday, making sure his father showed up for bowling. Eventually, a spot serendipitously opened on the "Launchers," giving Teti the opportunity to bowl side by side with his dad. After almost six decades with the league, AT died last year at 90. But his son stayed on. "For me, it was about my father," said Teti, 54, of Lansdowne, a facilities manager at the Philadelphia Navy Yard.
NEWS
April 25, 2009
An insidious kind of organized crime has infiltrated the neighborhoods of New Jersey. It's not what you're thinking. This crime is flourishing in - of all the seemingly innocuous places - your local bowling alley. And it's not the offense against fashion committed by two-toned, Velcro-fastened rental shoes and vertically striped shirts advertising transmission shops. It's gambling. And it's roundly frowned upon in New Jersey - except in Atlantic City, the state-run lottery, the racetracks, and constant legislative efforts to legalize slot machines and sports betting.
LIVING
December 24, 2008 | By Jen A. Miller FOR THE INQUIRER
Even though ModSpace's holiday party has some of the trappings of your typical company-sponsored event - buffet line, free-flowing drinks, and employees dressed in red and green - the setting is anything but the same old, same old. There are pool tables, techno music, big-screen TVs playing How the Grinch Stole Christmas, and bowling. As companies tighten belts while trying to keep up employee morale, unconventional, interactive parties are giving employers more bang for their holiday-party buck.
NEWS
September 8, 2008 | INQUIRER STAFF
'Bangkok' tops slow box-office weekend The critically panned thriller Bangkok Dangerous starring Nicholas Cage needed just $7.8 million to win top spot at the box office last weekend, the slowest movie weekend in five years, according to studio estimates. The total weekend box-office gross was expected to reach $66 million, slightly less than the $66.7 million for the same weekend in September 2003. "We had no strong holdover from Labor Day weekend," said Paul Dergarabedian, president of Media by Numbers.
NEWS
February 24, 2008 | By Michael Vitez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A fever is sweeping through America's retirement communities. Bowling fever. Few are spared. It strikes even the infirm. Mary Mortenson, 89, has it bad. When her turn came to bowl on Thursday, she stood, leaning on a metal chair for support. "My legs won't hold me," she said. She slid the chair out into the center aisle of her retirement community's auditorium. As she braced herself on the chair with her left hand, she concentrated on the projector screen in front of her, which displayed a virtual bowling lane.
NEWS
January 22, 2008 | By Sam Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two men who have confessed in the beating death of a teenager argued after the killing about what to do with her 5-week-old girl, authorities said yesterday. Douglas Mandichak and Christopher Mikels considered throwing the baby into the icy waters of Pennsauken Creek, but in the end abandoned her in the front yard of a Cherry Hill home, acting Camden County Prosecutor Joshua Ottenberg said. After finding the baby's stroller in the water, police yesterday continued to comb the banks of the creek in Cinnaminson for the body of her mother, 17-year-old Felicia Mikels of Pennsauken, which the men said they dumped into the water.
NEWS
January 13, 2008 | By Todd Gitlin
This year will be chock-full of 1968 commemorations. Deservedly so, because that was a pivotal year in which the convulsions of a decade converged and the country slouched over the edge of a precipice. It was, after all, the year of the Tet offensive in Vietnam; Walter Cronkite's televised farewell to victory in that wretched war; the My Lai massacre (unknown until the next year); Eugene McCarthy's presidential run; Columbia University's uprising; President Johnson's decision not to run for a second full term; the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s assassination; scores of subsequent riots; Robert F. Kennedy's assassination; the Chicago Democratic Convention riot; the Miss America protest in Atlantic City; Richard Nixon's "Southern Strategy" and election; and, for good measure, the first manned voyages in the Apollo program - not to mention Prague Spring, the French student uprising, the Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia, and, in Mexico City, the massacre of protesting students and the black power salutes of Olympic athletes John Carlos and Tommie Smith.
NEWS
July 8, 2007 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
The folks at 20th Century Fox are holding a contest to finally resolve a mystery that has perplexed TV viewers for nearly two decades: Where does Homer Simpson live? In Springfield. Right. But which one? About 55 are scattered from Maine to California. More puzzling: Why is Fox wasting its time? We know the Simpsons' hometown is near water, far enough north to get snow, close to a nuclear power plant. Mrs. Van Houten, Milhouse's mom, mentions Mechanicsburg, and Barney, the town drunk, has been a lecturer at Villanova University.
NEWS
June 4, 2007 | By Patricia Mans FOR THE INQUIRER
When Michael, 12, grows up, he wants to be a police officer, so "I can help people get safe," he says. Handsome and likable, he has a variety of interests, including playing basketball, reading, listening to rap music and watching cartoons. He also enjoys challenging his friends at computer games, as well as trying to raise his own scores. Not long ago, he started playing football and already has made a couple of interceptions. He recently visited a bowling alley for the first time and soon was skilled enough to knock down almost all the pins with one ball.
SPORTS
March 12, 2007 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
A man was arrested and charged with aggravated assault after police said he threatened troubled Titans cornerback Adam "Pacman" Jones with a knife at a Franklin, Tenn., bowling alley Friday night. Franklin Police Detective Stephanie Cisco told the Tennessean newspaper that Jones was bowling at the Franklin Family Entertainment Center when Clayton Smith, 33, instigated the confrontation, brandishing a small pocket knife. Smith "threatened to beat up Mr. Jones and to use the knife on him," Cisco said.
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