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SPORTS
January 12, 1994 | Daily News Wire Services
Black college basketball coaches, their anger ignited by the decision of NCAA delegates not to restore a scholarship, likely will boycott games, and players and some white coaches are expected to join them. Rudy Washington, head of the Black Coaches Association and coach at Drake, said yesterday he expects his group to boycott games, possibly for the rest of the season. The boycott could begin as early as Saturday, Martin Luther King's birthday. "In all likelihood, there will be a boycott, but I am reluctant to give you a time and date," Washington said.
NEWS
September 26, 1990 | By Leigh Jackson, Daily News Staff Writer
Radio stations WDAS-AM and WDAS-FM are calling for a boycott of all Japanese products to protest comments made last week by a Japanese Cabinet minister who compared black Americans to prostitutes. "It just seems stupid to continue to support institutions that don't support us," said E. Steven Collins, information director for the stations. The black-owned stations were expected to announce the boycott at a community meeting today at the Afro-American Historical and Cultural Museum at 7th and Arch streets.
SPORTS
January 12, 1994 | ASSOCIATED PRESS Inquirer staff writer Mike Bruton contributed to this article
The executive director of the Black Coaches Association, upset over the NCAA's decision to cut scholarships, said yesterday he expects his group to boycott men's college basketball games. The boycott, which would include coaches and players, could begin as early as Saturday, which is Martin Luther King's birthday. An official date had not been set last night. "In all likelihood there will be a boycott, but I am reluctant to give you a time and date," said Rudy Washington, head of the 3,000-member BCA and basketball coach at Drake.
NEWS
December 6, 1995 | By Warren Goldstein
Forty years ago today, African American citizens of Montgomery, Ala., launched one of the great movements of the 20th century. Four days after Rosa Parks, a seamstress riding the bus home from work, was arrested for refusing to give up her seat to white riders, the black community pulled off a stunning boycott of the bus system. That night a crowd at least 5,000 strong packed the Holt Street Baptist Church, as well as the streets for acres around. Loudspeakers carried the proceedings to the immense, excited crowd.
NEWS
July 3, 1987 | BY MIKE ROYKO
It's surprising that Jesse Jackson has become so easily satisfied. Months ago, Jackson was outraged that major-league baseball had so few blacks in top management positions. And he warned that if things didn't improve soon, there would be a boycott of baseball games on July 4, traditionally one of the biggest attendance days of the season. Now, with July 4 almost here, Jackson says he isn't going to hold a boycott after all. "There will not be a boycott on July 4," he said, "because the process is well under way. " Say, what?
BUSINESS
November 15, 1996 | By Rosland Briggs, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER This article contains information from Reuters news service
Carl Bryant is stuck in the middle. An African American, he runs two Texaco stations in Philadelphia. He estimates that sales - both from the pumps and the enclosed sales area - have dropped 30 percent since Nov. 4, when a 1994 tape recording of Texaco Inc. executives allegedly using racial slurs became public. Today, he said he would learn whether community leaders planned to boycott his gas station at Broad and Diamond Streets. "It's affecting everybody. Right is right, and wrong is wrong.
NEWS
September 9, 2004
TO COLUMNIST Elmer Smith: Regarding the Kobe Bryant rape case and apology, you hit the nail on the head. He apologized for raping a young woman by blaming her for not understanding his intentions? I was caught breathless by this. He could have spared us all this debacle, but instead dragged his wife, the victim, the press and the public along for a ride. Mr. Bryant is draped in the same tainted cloth as Mike Tyson, William Kennedy Smith and other high-profile people who think they are above the law. I will make sure I never buy anything associated with his name again.
NEWS
December 1, 1987 | By VALERIA M. RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer
Only about half of the 700 pupils at the Morton McMichael Elementary School attended this morning, the second day of a boycott by parents who are angry that the school's acting principal, Nilsa Gonzalez, was not appointed to the job permanently. Yesterday, only about 36 pupils attended the school, at 36th and Fairmount Avenue, said School District spokesman William C. Thompson. This morning was the first on the job for the new principal, Russell Sgro, who had been in charge of the special education program for schools in South Philadelphia.
NEWS
June 5, 2009
MARYANNE McGovern won't watch "24," one of the her favorite TV shows, because Janeane Garofalo made a comment she disagrees with, that tea-baggers were confused, angry, racist individuals incapable of understanding a commonsense speech and noting their focus on the president's cultural identity rather than his policies. Surely the answer to our problems as Americans (though we often differ) is not to protest watching one of the best dramas on TV simply because someone has an opposing view.
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NEWS
July 21, 2016 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, POLITICS WRITER
CLEVELAND - Ohio Gov. John Kasich is all over town this week, except inside the Republican convention hall downtown. Kasich, a Republican, has taken the rare and impolitic step of boycotting his party's convention in his home state, drawing scorn from party nominee (and former primary rival) Donald Trump's campaign. Suffice it to say he's not on the "Trump Train. " Instead, Kasich is pursuing a schedule that looks an awful lot like a road map for somebody planning to run for president again in 2020.
NEWS
June 29, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
TRENTON - New Jersey lawmakers voted overwhelmingly Monday to prohibit the state Treasury Department from investing public employee pension funds in companies that boycott Israel. The legislation, which is intended to defend Israel and Israeli companies from the "boycott, divestment, and sanctions" movement launched by Palestinians and their allies in 2005, now heads to Gov. Christie's desk. It passed the Assembly, 69-3, with two abstentions, and the Senate on a 37-0 vote Monday.
NEWS
June 28, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
New Jersey is about to boycott a boycott movement against Israel. Lawmakers on Monday are expected to pass legislation that would prohibit the state Treasury Department from investing public employee pension funds in companies that boycott Israel as part of the so-called "boycott, divestment, and sanctions" movement. It would join about a dozen other states that have taken similar action, most recently New York, where Gov. Andrew Cuomo this month signed an executive order requiring divestment of public funds from companies that have engaged in the BDS campaign against Israel.
SPORTS
May 19, 2016
J UST ABOUT every word Sam Bradford said rang true, until we got to the very last question of Bradford's 13-minute session with reporters Tuesday at NovaCare. "No," Bradford said, when asked if he had any regrets about the way he and agent Tom Condon handled the Eagles' move to trade up to second overall in the draft and select quarterback Carson Wentz. Bradford and Condon requested a trade, and chose to make that request public, presumably to pressure the Eagles into moving Bradford to Denver, where Condon has said he thought there was considerable interest.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2016
DEAR ABBY: My son, "Chad," is being married in June to "Jenny," a girl his sister "Madison" introduced him to. Madison feels she should be a bridesmaid in their wedding because she introduced them. Madison had sex with Jenny's boyfriend "Axel" before she met Chad, got pregnant, and had Axel's baby. Jenny feels Madison screwed up her life, and, even though she's about to marry my son, she doesn't want to reward Madison by asking her to be in the wedding. My daughter says that if she's not in the wedding she won't attend and won't allow her son (by Axel)
NEWS
January 22, 2016 | By Howard Gensler
W ILL SMITH S ays he will not attend the Academy Awards next month, joining his wife, Jada Pinkett Smith , and others in protest against two straight years of all-white acting nominees. "My wife's not going. It would be awkward for me to show up with Charlize ( Theron )," said Smith on ABC's "Good Morning America" yesterday. "We've discussed it, but at this current time, we're uncomfortable to stand there and say this is OK. " Smith, who some thought might be nominated for "Concussion," said his decision was "deeply not about me. " "This is about children that are going to sit down and they're going to watch the show and they're not going to see themselves represented," said Smith.
NEWS
November 6, 2015
IN AN ATTEMPT to intimidate and discredit director Quentin Tarantino, police organizations across the country have united in a boycott of his soon-to-be-released film, "The Hateful Eight. " Why? Because Tarantino exercised his right to free speech by attending and speaking at "Rise Up October," a massive, three-day demonstration in New York City which called for an end to police terror. Ironically, the boycott and intensive publicity of "The Hateful Eight" will only attract more moviegoers when it hits theaters on Christmas Day. As the saying goes, "there's not such thing as bad publicity.
NEWS
October 30, 2015 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
PHILADELPHIA police union leaders jumped on the boycott bandwagon of filmmaker Quentin Tarantino, a few days after the New York and Los Angeles police unions announced a similar boycott, because Tarantino attended a rally against police brutality last weekend. "Mr. Tarantino has made a good living through his films, projecting into society at large violence and respect for criminals; he, it turns out, also hates cops," read a statement from Philly's Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 5, which represents about 6,500 officers.
NEWS
July 13, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham and Caitlin McCabe, Inquirer Staff Writers
Amid opening-day commerce at the NAACP's annual conference Saturday in Philadelphia, the group's leaders lifted a 15-year ban on tourism and economic activity in South Carolina. The decision by the board of directors, made in private at the Convention Center, came one day after that state removed the Confederate battle flag from the grounds of its Capitol, abruptly ending decades of tension surrounding the symbol. To some, the flag is a reminder of deep racial division; to others, a symbol of Southern pride and heritage.
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