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NEWS
July 20, 2015 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Nothing about Lucy RorkeAdams is retiring. Not her crowded office in Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, lined with medical texts and stacks of professional journals, two microscopes at the ready. Certainly not her manner - forthright and candid, ready to provide detailed answers to every question posed. And yet, this month, Rorke-Adams, 86, senior pediatric neuropathologist at CHOP and clinical professor of pathology and laboratory medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, will retire after a career spanning more than a half-century at Children's and the old Philadelphia General Hospital, where she served her internship and residency.
NEWS
January 22, 1987
I believe that Nicholas O. Berry's recent article ("The coddling of college students") was greatly unfair to many of us college students who truly care about our education. While it is true that many students do fit Mr. Berry's description, it is wrong to stereotype all those who attend college as "sponges" and "clones. " I particularly resent the statement that today's college students are "brain dead. " Perhaps, Mr. Berry, we're being taught by brain- dead instructors. Tom Granahan Philadelphia.
NEWS
January 10, 2001 | By Milagros M. Padilla
This message is for drug addicts to let you know that we do care, and even though we walk past you without showing feelings, concern is in our hearts. Let's take a closer look. The addict gets a craving for drugs. He gets the drug without really consulting with his brain. In Spanish, one would say, "I need la cura, mannn. " He thinks that by getting the drug (la cura means "the cure"), he is cured, but he is sadly mistaken because he is allowing the nervous system to get further addicted.
SPORTS
November 23, 2012 | Associated Press
SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico - Famed Puerto Rican boxer Hector "Macho" Camacho is clinically brain dead, doctors said Thursday. They said family members were disagreeing on whether to take him off life support. Dr. Ernesto Torres said doctors have finished performing all medical tests on Camacho, who was shot in the face Tuesday night. "We have done everything we could," said Torres, who is the director of the Centro Medico trauma center. "We have to tell the people of Puerto Rico and the entire world that Macho Camacho has died, he is brain dead.
NEWS
May 13, 2002 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Thousands of psychiatrists and other experts on the brain and behavior will descend on Center City over the next two weeks for three professional meetings that illustrate the breadth of modern psychiatry. The groups will discuss everything from intensive talk therapy to the chemistry and structure of the brain to the interaction of biology and experience. Philadelphia will play host this week to the American Psychoanalytic Association and the Society of Biological Psychiatry and, starting on the weekend, the American Psychiatric Association, holding the world's largest psychiatric meeting.
NEWS
August 27, 1996 | by Don Rubin, Special to the Daily News
Athletes stretch. Musicians tune up. You don't just jump into a car and stomp on the gas. OK, maybe you do. But it's probably a better idea to warm up the engine first. Here are some exercises designed to do that for your brain, in preparation for the impending school year. Good luck. (The answers are printed upside down. We don't need to tell you that cheating is way uncool.) 1. Each of the symbols in this simple division problem stands for a number from zero to nine.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
In hindsight, Susan Wendel thinks her daughter was sick months before she wound up in a coma. Charlotte's second-grade teacher that fall complained that she was disruptive. That was a big change from first grade, but her mother wrote it off as growing pains. Other behavior was a little odd, too. "She did things like wear her sweater backwards and pull her pockets inside out," Wendel said. Still, Charlotte was 7. Eccentricity isn't unusual at that age. But, as 2009 ended, Charlotte crashed.
NEWS
June 26, 2014 | BY WILLIAM BENDER, Daily News Staff Writer benderw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5255
MARY Anderson doesn't know where her son is. She knows that his skin and bones were buried at Northwood Cemetery. But Vance Anderson's brain, eyes and other internal organs never made it to his West Oak Lane grave site. The 51-year-old painter, who died in 2012 at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital of complications from a lung condition, was allegedly a hollowed-out shell by the time he was lowered into the ground - stripped for parts like a junkyard Chevy. Vance Anderson's insides were, in the words of a Jefferson doctor, "donated for education.
NEWS
November 3, 2013 | By Reuben Kramer, For The Inquirer
It's a scene that might be repeated dozens of times on Drexel University's campus today: A student, sitting at a table, eating pizza. But Annie Feng is different. The sophomore nibbles on a mini pizza while wearing a headband designed to measure her brain activity. And unlike many brain-imaging machines, this device can be used at a table. By monitoring the brains of people during meals, researchers hope to learn about the cognitive aspects of eating, and why some people stop at a single slice while others devour the pie. This portable device has sparked the interest of researchers worldwide.
NEWS
September 16, 2013 | By Leila Haghighat, Inquirer Staff Writer
William Acosta lies asleep on an operating table at Jefferson University Hospital. A surgeon is drilling a pen-sized hole into his skull. Curiously, the OR begins to smell like sawdust. Doctors then reduce his anesthesia, and Acosta, his brain still open, wakes up. Over the next five hours, Acosta, 56, of Glenside, will be both a patient and a collaborator in his own brain care. By staying awake, he will help surgeons find the part of his brain involved in Parkinson's disease.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 20, 2015 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Nothing about Lucy RorkeAdams is retiring. Not her crowded office in Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, lined with medical texts and stacks of professional journals, two microscopes at the ready. Certainly not her manner - forthright and candid, ready to provide detailed answers to every question posed. And yet, this month, Rorke-Adams, 86, senior pediatric neuropathologist at CHOP and clinical professor of pathology and laboratory medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, will retire after a career spanning more than a half-century at Children's and the old Philadelphia General Hospital, where she served her internship and residency.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2015 | By Paul Jablow, For The Inquirer
It definitely wasn't something Jeanne Buerkel would have tried in the corporate world, even having reached an age when you can say almost anything and get away with it. "Are you chewing gum?" Buerkel, 89, asked the woman about to exit the SEPTA bus with her. She waited a split second for the shocked stare, and then: "Me, too!" The woman exploded in laughter. For Buerkel, a retired business developer for architects, it had nothing to do with chewing gum and everything to do with an improv routine she wanted to try out in the real world.
NEWS
June 9, 2015 | Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
Describing Jim Kenney's nascent Philadelphia mayoral campaign, Ken Snyder called to mind an improbable escape scene from a famous comic film. "All right, we're down 14 points and we have $75,000 in the bank," said Kenney's political strategist, recounting the candidate's initial standing in the polls and the state of his finances. "It felt like The Blues Brothers : 'It's dark out, we're wearing sunglasses, and we're out of gas. Let's hit it.' " Snyder may have slightly misquoted Dan Aykroyd's classic line, but the sentiment was dead-on: Here was as impossible a mission as a campaign strategist could face - a late start, an underfunded candidate, and two formidable opponents.
NEWS
June 8, 2015 | By Paul Jablow, For The Inquirer
When Stephen Weber saw an ad seeking participants to help determine whether online games could improve brain function, it was, well, a no-brainer. The Drexel senior would get paid for what sounded to him like playing Nintendo. Maybe it could even help him remedy his weakness in math, he thought. So he signed up for a University of Pennsylvania study on "the effects of Lumosity on brain activity and decision-making behavior. " There's much more at stake here than the fortunes of an industry whose revenue is expected to hit $6 billion a year by 2020.
NEWS
May 25, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Gov. Christie vowed to rein in government spending when he took office in 2010, and one of his most controversial first-term initiatives was setting a cap on salaries for school district superintendents. Anecdotes of seemingly exorbitant pay for school administrators became a symbol of the government excess Christie had pledged to rid from Trenton. Four years after Christie set his own salary - $175,000 - as a maximum base for superintendents, Democratic lawmakers and school boards say the regulation has resulted in high turnover and made the state less competitive in attracting the best administrators.
NEWS
April 12, 2015 | By Dr. Jeffrey Miller, For The Inquirer
By the time A.A. arrived in my office, she had spent almost a year looking for answers. In November 2012, she was 45 and struggling to lose weight and keep her blood pressure down. What sounds like a common scenario, however, was anything but. A.A. was experiencing fatigue and malaise, and the area around her eyes bruised easily. Another puzzling symptom: She said she was acutely aware of her neck. It wasn't pain, but awareness. She was losing more hair than usual in her brush and had stopped menstruating, and her skin broke open easily.
NEWS
April 8, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Having trouble remembering all the elements of the proper golf swing? Getting stuck while trying to pick out that tune on the piano? Maybe you're thinking too much. That is the implication of a new study published Monday by researchers at the University of Pennsylvania, the University of California Santa Barbara, and Johns Hopkins University. On four occasions over a six-week period, the scientists used MRI machines to measure the brain activity of people as they tapped out various 10-digit sequences on a keyboard.
NEWS
March 24, 2015 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
THERESA "TERRI" Robinson ignored the pitfalls of working full time as a health-care manager while attending Lincoln University full time to earn a master's degree in human services. She smoked. She ate salty, fatty foods. She was in her 50s but didn't think about her family's high-risk medical history. Until one night in late March 2012, when she suffered a brain aneurysm. "Finding my mother lying on the floor was one of the most devastating moments of my life," said Robinson's son, Michael, 26, who called 9-1-1 in time to save her. Robinson, 58, who lives in Germantown, said she should have seen the warning signs long before she lost her 25-year health-care career and nearly lost her life.
NEWS
February 6, 2015 | By Howard Gensler
IF "AMERICAN SNIPER" can fire a shot in the culture war, why not "Frozen"? "Frozen"? Yesterday morning, Steve Doocy , of "Fox and Friends," led off a segment on the megapopular animated movie with the basic premise that its intention was to emasculate men. (Actually, its intention was to sell a bazillion CDs, DVDs, costumes, coloring books, etc., but why let the free market interfere with Fox News silliness? Although it is true that male testicles get very small when they're frozen.)
SPORTS
February 6, 2015 | BY JEFF NEIBURG, For the Daily News
AVERY MARZ is stepping up and then off of an aerobic platform. Her left foot lands on the platform first and her right foot follows. She does this repeatedly as her physical therapist watches. Her mother, Mary Beth Schoellkopf, stands off to the side and watches intently. Marz, a Saint Joseph's freshman, is wearing a T-shirt from the basketball camp of women's coach Cindy Griffin, a pair of Jordan-brand basketball shorts, athletic shoes and a white headband to keep the sweat from trickling down on her face.
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