CollectionsBrain
IN THE NEWS

Brain

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 11, 2014 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
IF CHRISTINA SANKEY had been an angel-faced toddler when she went missing, we might know by now how she wound up dead, half-naked and alone, between two parked cars in West Philly on a frigid winter morning. The city would've been galvanized by her death. Government officials would've promised to find out how she met her tragic end. Someone would've created a sidewalk memorial, and others would've led prayer vigils to honor the life that was lost. But Christina, 37, had the mentality of a 2-year-old, but not the physique.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
In hindsight, Susan Wendel thinks her daughter was sick months before she wound up in a coma. Charlotte's second-grade teacher that fall complained that she was disruptive. That was a big change from first grade, but her mother wrote it off as growing pains. Other behavior was a little odd, too. "She did things like wear her sweater backwards and pull her pockets inside out," Wendel said. Still, Charlotte was 7. Eccentricity isn't unusual at that age. But, as 2009 ended, Charlotte crashed.
NEWS
January 22, 1987
I believe that Nicholas O. Berry's recent article ("The coddling of college students") was greatly unfair to many of us college students who truly care about our education. While it is true that many students do fit Mr. Berry's description, it is wrong to stereotype all those who attend college as "sponges" and "clones. " I particularly resent the statement that today's college students are "brain dead. " Perhaps, Mr. Berry, we're being taught by brain- dead instructors. Tom Granahan Philadelphia.
NEWS
January 10, 2001 | By Milagros M. Padilla
This message is for drug addicts to let you know that we do care, and even though we walk past you without showing feelings, concern is in our hearts. Let's take a closer look. The addict gets a craving for drugs. He gets the drug without really consulting with his brain. In Spanish, one would say, "I need la cura, mannn. " He thinks that by getting the drug (la cura means "the cure"), he is cured, but he is sadly mistaken because he is allowing the nervous system to get further addicted.
SPORTS
November 23, 2012 | Associated Press
SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico - Famed Puerto Rican boxer Hector "Macho" Camacho is clinically brain dead, doctors said Thursday. They said family members were disagreeing on whether to take him off life support. Dr. Ernesto Torres said doctors have finished performing all medical tests on Camacho, who was shot in the face Tuesday night. "We have done everything we could," said Torres, who is the director of the Centro Medico trauma center. "We have to tell the people of Puerto Rico and the entire world that Macho Camacho has died, he is brain dead.
NEWS
May 13, 2002 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Thousands of psychiatrists and other experts on the brain and behavior will descend on Center City over the next two weeks for three professional meetings that illustrate the breadth of modern psychiatry. The groups will discuss everything from intensive talk therapy to the chemistry and structure of the brain to the interaction of biology and experience. Philadelphia will play host this week to the American Psychoanalytic Association and the Society of Biological Psychiatry and, starting on the weekend, the American Psychiatric Association, holding the world's largest psychiatric meeting.
NEWS
August 27, 1996 | by Don Rubin, Special to the Daily News
Athletes stretch. Musicians tune up. You don't just jump into a car and stomp on the gas. OK, maybe you do. But it's probably a better idea to warm up the engine first. Here are some exercises designed to do that for your brain, in preparation for the impending school year. Good luck. (The answers are printed upside down. We don't need to tell you that cheating is way uncool.) 1. Each of the symbols in this simple division problem stands for a number from zero to nine.
NEWS
November 3, 2013 | By Reuben Kramer, For The Inquirer
It's a scene that might be repeated dozens of times on Drexel University's campus today: A student, sitting at a table, eating pizza. But Annie Feng is different. The sophomore nibbles on a mini pizza while wearing a headband designed to measure her brain activity. And unlike many brain-imaging machines, this device can be used at a table. By monitoring the brains of people during meals, researchers hope to learn about the cognitive aspects of eating, and why some people stop at a single slice while others devour the pie. This portable device has sparked the interest of researchers worldwide.
NEWS
September 16, 2013 | By Leila Haghighat, Inquirer Staff Writer
William Acosta lies asleep on an operating table at Jefferson University Hospital. A surgeon is drilling a pen-sized hole into his skull. Curiously, the OR begins to smell like sawdust. Doctors then reduce his anesthesia, and Acosta, his brain still open, wakes up. Over the next five hours, Acosta, 56, of Glenside, will be both a patient and a collaborator in his own brain care. By staying awake, he will help surgeons find the part of his brain involved in Parkinson's disease.
SPORTS
January 7, 2005 | Daily News Wire Services
Connecticut freshman guard A.J. Price will miss the rest of the season undergoing treatment for a blood vessel abnormality in his brain, the school said yesterday. Price had an intracranial hemorrhage in October and spent several days in critical condition at Hartford Hospital. He was cleared to return to classes on Jan. 18, but his doctor said the abnormality will keep him out of practice and games for months. The condition is marked by masses of abnormal blood vessels that grow in the brain and malform into a mass capable of bleeding.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 6, 2014 | By Al Haas, For The Inquirer
As a general rule, gas-electric hybrid cars and trucks are not fun; their very nature precludes it. Hybrids are made to maximize conservation at the expense of stimulation. The thrill of driving one is seeing the m.p.g. indicator creep higher, rather than the speedometer. Certainly that's true of the Toyota Prius, which loudly proclaims its mission without any endearing aesthetic quality. But a fuel-sipper doesn't have to look ugly to be efficient; you could opt for the 2014 Ford Fusion Hybrid.
NEWS
March 29, 2014 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
The family of Jahi McMath, the 13-year-old California girl whose parents refused to accept a finding of brain death, was honored for courage and perseverance Thursday night at the Union League by the family of Terri Schiavo. The McMath family went to court in December to oppose the removal of a ventilator and feeding tube even after three physicians determined that there was no brain function and a coroner issued a death certificate. A month later, the body of the girl - organs still working - was taken to an undisclosed medical facility, where the heart still beats.
NEWS
February 21, 2014
A PAIR OF upcoming local beer-drinking events has me thinking out of both sides of my brain. My left side - controlled and analytical - is focused on Saturday's Bierfest at the German Society of Pennsylvania. I'll sit on a panel of beer experts to discuss classic, old-world lager styles. My right side - freewheeling and emotional - is preparing for Beer School at the Loft at Iron Abbey, in Horsham, next week. I'll lead an advanced class on unconventional beer ingredients that produce inventive, newfangled flavors.
NEWS
February 19, 2014 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rutgers University will try to entice New Jersey's best and brightest to stay in-state with a new undergraduate merit scholarship that president Robert L. Barchi announced Monday. The Henry Rutgers Merit Scholarship will be awarded to 100 undergraduates a year for each of the next four years in an attempt to reduce the flow of more than 30,000 students who leave the Garden State annually for college elsewhere. The scholarships will be available to freshmen entering in the fall of 2014.
NEWS
February 7, 2014
PIZZA AND BEER have always been one of life's most sacred combinations. But there's no chapter in the good book of pie-and-pint relations that quite addresses what Pizza Brain and Tired Hands Brewing Company have in mind. In January, Kensington's zany pizza-culture emporium introduced a monthly "Third Thursdees" collaboration event that has the parlor pairing with local businesses to create . . . something. The taco truck Calle del Sabor visited last month, providing jerk chicken for specialty slices.
NEWS
February 2, 2014 | By Dr. John Stern, For The Inquirer
What a headache! Coworkers at the nail salon were worried about Xi. She had been a remarkably reliable worker for the last 20 years. Always on time, she seemed to enjoy her work. Meticulous and skillful, she trimmed cuticles, filed nails and applied polish to her clients' fingers and toes, taking pride in perfection. Over the last month, however, Xi had started to show up late, sometimes with bedraggled hair and rumpled clothes. Her work was deteriorating, too. Regular customers were concerned, asking if she was ill or suffering.
NEWS
January 23, 2014 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Could headline-grabbing scenarios like those in Texas and California involving brain-dead patients happen here? Yes, experts say. First, Texas: Marlise Munoz, 33, was found by her husband, Erick, at 2 a.m. Nov. 26 on their 2-year-old son's bedroom floor. Her heart had stopped for perhaps an hour after a pulmonary embolism. Her husband began CPR, called 911. She was 14 weeks pregnant. Her family stated from the beginning - only confirmed by the hospital last week - that Munoz was brain-dead.
NEWS
January 23, 2014 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
WEST CHESTER A Chester County Court jury has awarded $32.8 million to a 4-year-old girl, concluding that she suffered brain damage at birth because nurses at Phoenixville Hospital failed to alert doctors about changes in her condition. After a two-week trial, the jury on Friday found two nurses were negligent when they waited 13 minutes to tell doctors that Lilly Ciechoski's heart rate had dropped, the family's lawyer said. The same jury found that a third nurse and the hospital were not to blame for the girl's injuries.
NEWS
January 20, 2014 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Peter Goldstein has always been freaked out by needles and blood. When he was about five, his mother, physician Susan Wiegers, had a small biopsy done. Goldstein and his brother asked to see the wound. "It was a tiny line with two stitches," she recalled. Goldstein's brother was fascinated. But Goldstein turned away. "I don't feel so good," he said. Then he keeled over. Since then, Goldstein has passed out, or come close to it, every time he has had a close encounter with a syringe or an intravenous line.
NEWS
January 13, 2014 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Memory loss, cognitive deficits, drops in IQ, and abnormal brain structures: these are but a few of the neurotoxic effects that recent research has correlated to marijuana use in adolescents. But while a number of studies suggest a link between these changes and regular cannabis use, particularly for young teens, there is no definitive evidence that marijuana is entirely to blame. Adolescents who smoke daily, for example, may have problems that predate marijuana use. One thing is certain: pot smoking among American teenagers is on the rise.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|