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NEWS
January 22, 1987
I believe that Nicholas O. Berry's recent article ("The coddling of college students") was greatly unfair to many of us college students who truly care about our education. While it is true that many students do fit Mr. Berry's description, it is wrong to stereotype all those who attend college as "sponges" and "clones. " I particularly resent the statement that today's college students are "brain dead. " Perhaps, Mr. Berry, we're being taught by brain- dead instructors. Tom Granahan Philadelphia.
NEWS
January 10, 2001 | By Milagros M. Padilla
This message is for drug addicts to let you know that we do care, and even though we walk past you without showing feelings, concern is in our hearts. Let's take a closer look. The addict gets a craving for drugs. He gets the drug without really consulting with his brain. In Spanish, one would say, "I need la cura, mannn. " He thinks that by getting the drug (la cura means "the cure"), he is cured, but he is sadly mistaken because he is allowing the nervous system to get further addicted.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
In hindsight, Susan Wendel thinks her daughter was sick months before she wound up in a coma. Charlotte's second-grade teacher that fall complained that she was disruptive. That was a big change from first grade, but her mother wrote it off as growing pains. Other behavior was a little odd, too. "She did things like wear her sweater backwards and pull her pockets inside out," Wendel said. Still, Charlotte was 7. Eccentricity isn't unusual at that age. But, as 2009 ended, Charlotte crashed.
SPORTS
November 23, 2012 | Associated Press
SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico - Famed Puerto Rican boxer Hector "Macho" Camacho is clinically brain dead, doctors said Thursday. They said family members were disagreeing on whether to take him off life support. Dr. Ernesto Torres said doctors have finished performing all medical tests on Camacho, who was shot in the face Tuesday night. "We have done everything we could," said Torres, who is the director of the Centro Medico trauma center. "We have to tell the people of Puerto Rico and the entire world that Macho Camacho has died, he is brain dead.
NEWS
May 13, 2002 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Thousands of psychiatrists and other experts on the brain and behavior will descend on Center City over the next two weeks for three professional meetings that illustrate the breadth of modern psychiatry. The groups will discuss everything from intensive talk therapy to the chemistry and structure of the brain to the interaction of biology and experience. Philadelphia will play host this week to the American Psychoanalytic Association and the Society of Biological Psychiatry and, starting on the weekend, the American Psychiatric Association, holding the world's largest psychiatric meeting.
NEWS
August 27, 1996 | by Don Rubin, Special to the Daily News
Athletes stretch. Musicians tune up. You don't just jump into a car and stomp on the gas. OK, maybe you do. But it's probably a better idea to warm up the engine first. Here are some exercises designed to do that for your brain, in preparation for the impending school year. Good luck. (The answers are printed upside down. We don't need to tell you that cheating is way uncool.) 1. Each of the symbols in this simple division problem stands for a number from zero to nine.
NEWS
November 3, 2013 | By Reuben Kramer, For The Inquirer
It's a scene that might be repeated dozens of times on Drexel University's campus today: A student, sitting at a table, eating pizza. But Annie Feng is different. The sophomore nibbles on a mini pizza while wearing a headband designed to measure her brain activity. And unlike many brain-imaging machines, this device can be used at a table. By monitoring the brains of people during meals, researchers hope to learn about the cognitive aspects of eating, and why some people stop at a single slice while others devour the pie. This portable device has sparked the interest of researchers worldwide.
NEWS
September 16, 2013 | By Leila Haghighat, Inquirer Staff Writer
William Acosta lies asleep on an operating table at Jefferson University Hospital. A surgeon is drilling a pen-sized hole into his skull. Curiously, the OR begins to smell like sawdust. Doctors then reduce his anesthesia, and Acosta, his brain still open, wakes up. Over the next five hours, Acosta, 56, of Glenside, will be both a patient and a collaborator in his own brain care. By staying awake, he will help surgeons find the part of his brain involved in Parkinson's disease.
SPORTS
January 7, 2005 | Daily News Wire Services
Connecticut freshman guard A.J. Price will miss the rest of the season undergoing treatment for a blood vessel abnormality in his brain, the school said yesterday. Price had an intracranial hemorrhage in October and spent several days in critical condition at Hartford Hospital. He was cleared to return to classes on Jan. 18, but his doctor said the abnormality will keep him out of practice and games for months. The condition is marked by masses of abnormal blood vessels that grow in the brain and malform into a mass capable of bleeding.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 1986 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
The star of Eliminators is something called a Mandroid, a human being who has had the right side of his brain removed. On the evidence, the two writers responsible for the film underwent the same surgery before embarking on their labors. Even by the humble standards established by previous vengeance sagas ending in -ators, Eliminators is as close to brain-dead as a movie can get. It rests on a question that has befuddled our best scholars: Is it possible to put a robot and a homicidal ninja in a pitched battle with a tribe of Neanderthals in contemporary Mexico without winding up with a very primitive movie?
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 10, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
In the 1990s, an Israeli biophysicist wondered whether cells that were in the process of dividing might be vulnerable to damage by electromagnetic energy. If so, then maybe electric fields could be used to disrupt the growth of cells that divide relentlessly and uncontrollably - otherwise known as cancer. Yoram Palti began testing his hypothesis in the lab of his fledgling company, Novocure, located in his basement. The therapy he called "tumor-treating fields" met with deep skepticism, and some experts still have doubts.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2015 | Gary Thompson, Staff Writer
"Consussion" seems like a strange Christmas release: Hey, lets go see that movie where pro football players with brain damage kill themselves. And in truth, it's not a knee-slappin' good time at the theater. But it is more appropriate to the season than you might guess - the story of a deeply religious man who undertakes a moral crusade, motivated by an abiding faith that gives him the courage to take on the NFL, based on his conviction that "God does not want us to play football.
NEWS
December 20, 2015 | By Emily Babay, Staff Writer
The young red panda that died unexpectedly at the Elmwood Park Zoo last month had a brain disease likely caused by a parasite. A brain biopsy determined that Clinger, who was just a year and a half old, died of meningoencephalitis, the zoo said Friday. The disease causes inflammation of the brain and Clinger, who died Nov. 29, was likely infected by a parasite. His mother also died of encephalitis that was brought on by a parasite. Clinger and his brothers all received preventative treatment, but the zoo said the disease is hard to detect without a brain biopsy.
NEWS
December 13, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
With the Philadelphia Orchestra and Opera Philadelphia going full throttle, the region's year in classical music was bound to be excellent. And it was, with particularly distinguished activity in the outlying areas involving specialists in music both ancient and modern from Chestnut Hill to Princeton. That doesn't mean everything worked out. But while lapses and misfires aren't as satisfying as successes, they can be just as interesting. Pope Francis' visit, for example . . . Most distracted concert.
SPORTS
November 25, 2015 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
FORMER PHILLIE Lenny Dykstra is filing another lawsuit. This time, according to TMZ, he's claiming suffered brain damage when he was allegedly beaten by Los Angeles County sheriff's deputies while serving time for grand theft auto. Lenny's asking for a cool $15 million. Dykstra claims that in April 2012, six sheriff's deputies slammed his head against the wall and broke several of his teeth. A sheriff's spokesman is on record as saying officers had to restrain Dykstra after he became aggressive.
NEWS
November 25, 2015 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
WE INTERRUPT my usual "You gotta do better, people!" rant with a column full of gratitude. I know . . . let's embrace the fleeting moment. It was kind of a nutty idea, I admit. But after hearing Jennifer Pownall's story, I couldn't resist. The Northeast Philly mom was diagnosed with three meningioma brain tumors last year. Sometimes, she told me, music was the only thing that got her through the pain. So, she created the Rock Out Brain Tumors Air Guitar Challenge to raise money for the National Brain Tumor Society by asking people to make videos of themselves rocking out for a good cause.
NEWS
October 26, 2015 | By Michael Vitez, For The Inquirer
Jackie Lithgow got out of his wheelchair at the starting line and began walking. He didn't think about the steps he was taking last weekend at the Flyers Charities 5K race. He just walked, and looked like anybody else walking, flanked by his parents and sister and grandmother and other family and friends, and that was the beauty of it. After a first few steps, the 20-year-old stopped to do a little dance move - what his parents might call the twist - right there in the middle of Pattison Avenue because he was happy and because he could.
BUSINESS
October 15, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Virtua, South Jersey's biggest health system, has entered into a partnership with Penn Medicine for cancer and neurosciences, the two tax-exempt systems announced Tuesday. Penn's Abramson Cancer Center will replace Fox Chase Cancer Center, and in a neurosciences collaboration, Penn doctors will operate at Virtua Memorial Hospital, in Mount Holly. Virtua has been sending certain stroke patients to Capital Health in Hopewell Township, N.J. Penn, the region's biggest health system, with about $5.3 billion in revenue, has many ties to community hospitals, but "this is a deeper relationship," said Ralph W. Muller, chief executive of the University of Pennsylvania Health System after the announcement at Virtua's Voorhees hospital.
SPORTS
October 5, 2015 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sean Sanchirico has simple aspirations at this stage of his life: take classes at Rutgers Camden, spend time with family and friends, improve his game as a member of the Scarlet Raptors golf team. "Just be a normal college student," Sanchirico said, setting the bar at a level that always seemed unattainable in recent years. In one way, the 20-year-old from Haddon Township has made good on his goal. His days are pretty pedestrian for a popular pre-business major who can be found many afternoons at the Camden County Golf Academy driving range on Cooper River in Pennsauken.
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