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ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
In hindsight, Susan Wendel thinks her daughter was sick months before she wound up in a coma. Charlotte's second-grade teacher that fall complained that she was disruptive. That was a big change from first grade, but her mother wrote it off as growing pains. Other behavior was a little odd, too. "She did things like wear her sweater backwards and pull her pockets inside out," Wendel said. Still, Charlotte was 7. Eccentricity isn't unusual at that age. But, as 2009 ended, Charlotte crashed.
NEWS
January 22, 1987
I believe that Nicholas O. Berry's recent article ("The coddling of college students") was greatly unfair to many of us college students who truly care about our education. While it is true that many students do fit Mr. Berry's description, it is wrong to stereotype all those who attend college as "sponges" and "clones. " I particularly resent the statement that today's college students are "brain dead. " Perhaps, Mr. Berry, we're being taught by brain- dead instructors. Tom Granahan Philadelphia.
NEWS
January 10, 2001 | By Milagros M. Padilla
This message is for drug addicts to let you know that we do care, and even though we walk past you without showing feelings, concern is in our hearts. Let's take a closer look. The addict gets a craving for drugs. He gets the drug without really consulting with his brain. In Spanish, one would say, "I need la cura, mannn. " He thinks that by getting the drug (la cura means "the cure"), he is cured, but he is sadly mistaken because he is allowing the nervous system to get further addicted.
SPORTS
November 23, 2012 | Associated Press
SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico - Famed Puerto Rican boxer Hector "Macho" Camacho is clinically brain dead, doctors said Thursday. They said family members were disagreeing on whether to take him off life support. Dr. Ernesto Torres said doctors have finished performing all medical tests on Camacho, who was shot in the face Tuesday night. "We have done everything we could," said Torres, who is the director of the Centro Medico trauma center. "We have to tell the people of Puerto Rico and the entire world that Macho Camacho has died, he is brain dead.
NEWS
May 13, 2002 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Thousands of psychiatrists and other experts on the brain and behavior will descend on Center City over the next two weeks for three professional meetings that illustrate the breadth of modern psychiatry. The groups will discuss everything from intensive talk therapy to the chemistry and structure of the brain to the interaction of biology and experience. Philadelphia will play host this week to the American Psychoanalytic Association and the Society of Biological Psychiatry and, starting on the weekend, the American Psychiatric Association, holding the world's largest psychiatric meeting.
NEWS
August 27, 1996 | by Don Rubin, Special to the Daily News
Athletes stretch. Musicians tune up. You don't just jump into a car and stomp on the gas. OK, maybe you do. But it's probably a better idea to warm up the engine first. Here are some exercises designed to do that for your brain, in preparation for the impending school year. Good luck. (The answers are printed upside down. We don't need to tell you that cheating is way uncool.) 1. Each of the symbols in this simple division problem stands for a number from zero to nine.
NEWS
November 3, 2013 | By Reuben Kramer, For The Inquirer
It's a scene that might be repeated dozens of times on Drexel University's campus today: A student, sitting at a table, eating pizza. But Annie Feng is different. The sophomore nibbles on a mini pizza while wearing a headband designed to measure her brain activity. And unlike many brain-imaging machines, this device can be used at a table. By monitoring the brains of people during meals, researchers hope to learn about the cognitive aspects of eating, and why some people stop at a single slice while others devour the pie. This portable device has sparked the interest of researchers worldwide.
NEWS
September 16, 2013 | By Leila Haghighat, Inquirer Staff Writer
William Acosta lies asleep on an operating table at Jefferson University Hospital. A surgeon is drilling a pen-sized hole into his skull. Curiously, the OR begins to smell like sawdust. Doctors then reduce his anesthesia, and Acosta, his brain still open, wakes up. Over the next five hours, Acosta, 56, of Glenside, will be both a patient and a collaborator in his own brain care. By staying awake, he will help surgeons find the part of his brain involved in Parkinson's disease.
SPORTS
January 7, 2005 | Daily News Wire Services
Connecticut freshman guard A.J. Price will miss the rest of the season undergoing treatment for a blood vessel abnormality in his brain, the school said yesterday. Price had an intracranial hemorrhage in October and spent several days in critical condition at Hartford Hospital. He was cleared to return to classes on Jan. 18, but his doctor said the abnormality will keep him out of practice and games for months. The condition is marked by masses of abnormal blood vessels that grow in the brain and malform into a mass capable of bleeding.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 1986 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
The star of Eliminators is something called a Mandroid, a human being who has had the right side of his brain removed. On the evidence, the two writers responsible for the film underwent the same surgery before embarking on their labors. Even by the humble standards established by previous vengeance sagas ending in -ators, Eliminators is as close to brain-dead as a movie can get. It rests on a question that has befuddled our best scholars: Is it possible to put a robot and a homicidal ninja in a pitched battle with a tribe of Neanderthals in contemporary Mexico without winding up with a very primitive movie?
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 25, 2016 | By Daniel R. Taylor, For The Inquirer
"Many things we need can wait. The child cannot. Now is the time his bones are being formed, his blood is being made, his mind is being developed. To him we cannot say tomorrow, his name is today. " - Gabriela Mistral, Chilean Poet, Nobel Laureate The main aim of pediatrics is prevention. Prevention of diseases, of injury, of emotional problems, of developmental and intellectual delays. Our armamentarium include vaccines; screening instruments; and guidance on development, safety, and nutrition.
NEWS
April 5, 2016
ISSUE | PA. BUDGET Brain drain? The editorial "With a whimper" (March 24) highlights Pennsylvania's failure to pass a budget that adequately invests in human services. The state legislature has repeatedly failed to pass a budget that raises new revenue. As a result, human services have been sorely underfunded and could face drastic cuts if revenue is not increased this year. Failing to invest in human services has serious implications for the nonprofit job market.
SPORTS
March 31, 2016 | By Chris Melchiorre, For The Inquirer
This time next year, Conor Gaffney will be studying engineering at Lehigh University. He's not exactly sure what field, but he knows it suits his strengths in the classroom. Gaffney is analytical by nature. And not just in his studies. The mind-set also fuels his approach to winning faceoffs for the Lenape boys' lacrosse team, just as it will for the Mountain Hawks next season. Action in the faceoff circle can look almost barbaric - two players physically grappling for position of a ball that sits between them.
NEWS
March 26, 2016 | By Natalie Pompilio, For The Inquirer
At a coffee shop, Brian Mottolo will allow other customers to go ahead of him. He'll wait in the back, practicing his order in his head. When it's all clear, he'll approach the counter and say, "Medium dark roast. Cream and sugar. " When Mottolo, 52, shared that story during a meeting at Magee Rehab recently, his audience lauded him. "You've been practicing!" speech language pathologist Sarah Lantz said. "That's good. That's real good. " Mottolo has aphasia, the loss of the ability to use language because of damage to the brain.
NEWS
March 20, 2016 | By Daniel R. Taylor, For The Inquirer
Do you remember your child's first teacher? Your first teacher? The most influential teacher in your life? I'm sure most of us can. Mayor Kenney's proposal to tax sugary beverages and use much of the proceeds for prekindergarten has been making headlines lately. But this is a topic with implications well beyond education and politics. Early childhood education is a key contributor to lifelong health and a potent means to fight the health disparities that plague our city. In the first few years of a child's life, in every second there are 700 new brain cell connections being formed.
NEWS
March 19, 2016 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Three months shy of her 40th birthday, oil painter and Abington Art Center instructor Maggie Mills woke with visual problems and intense pain in her left eye. An ophthalmologist diagnosed optical neuritis - an inflammation of the optic nerve. Not convinced, Mills went on to the emergency department at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, where she learned she had multiple sclerosis. Two years later, and one month before her own 40th birthday, Amy Carson Smith - a painting student of Mills' - received an identical diagnosis after suffering numbness in her toes and occasional weakness in one arm. An MRI revealed that she also had the lesions in her brain associated with the disease.
NEWS
March 15, 2016
IF A biotech researcher developed a drug that could reverse the effects of Alzheimer's disease, few people would care if he or she was motivated by a love of mankind, a love of science or the desire to make a fortune. Why should they? All sorts of people do good and bad in the world for all sorts of reasons. That thought comes to mind because of a new report from the Harvard Graduate School of Education, which offers some troubling recommendations for how colleges and universities should rethink admissions.
NEWS
March 13, 2016
Ex-Chicago Bears quarterback Jim McMahon (who also spent time with the Eagles) calls himself "old school," including his use of marijuana both during and after his career. His self-medicating could be ahead of its time. Johns Hopkins researchers will test whether a compound found in hemp - and its cousin, cannabis - is as good at treating brain injuries as testimonials say. Some ex-players believe cannabidiol, or CBD, could aid millions who suffer brain injuries, including chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative disease caused by repeated concussions and found in many ex-NFL players whose brains were autopsied.
NEWS
March 13, 2016 | By Stacey Burling, Staff Writer
Like so many who had come to the recent Mind Your Brain conference at Penn Medicine, Janine Kirby wanted to talk about hope. Hers was hard-earned. After a series of concussions from soccer, "life stuff," and boxing, the blow that turned her into a brain injury survivor came at work on 12/12/12, a rare string of numbers that she can remember. A steel beam crashed into her head. From there, she rode a helicopter to Penn. Eighteen months into her recovery, she started having seizures so severe that doctors had to remove her entire right temporal lobe because it was crippled by scar tissue.
NEWS
March 6, 2016 | By Stacey Burling, Staff Writer
The lawyer knew something was wrong with her 61-year-old mother. She had begun showing up for appointments two hours early. Or two hours late. She was paying less attention to how she looked. She'd had two wrecks in quick succession on her way to work as a judge's administrative assistant. The lawyer, who works in a small town on the outskirts of Baltimore, knew her mother drank a fair amount at night, but she also knew her mother was still getting promotions. She suspected depression.
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