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ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
In hindsight, Susan Wendel thinks her daughter was sick months before she wound up in a coma. Charlotte's second-grade teacher that fall complained that she was disruptive. That was a big change from first grade, but her mother wrote it off as growing pains. Other behavior was a little odd, too. "She did things like wear her sweater backwards and pull her pockets inside out," Wendel said. Still, Charlotte was 7. Eccentricity isn't unusual at that age. But, as 2009 ended, Charlotte crashed.
NEWS
January 22, 1987
I believe that Nicholas O. Berry's recent article ("The coddling of college students") was greatly unfair to many of us college students who truly care about our education. While it is true that many students do fit Mr. Berry's description, it is wrong to stereotype all those who attend college as "sponges" and "clones. " I particularly resent the statement that today's college students are "brain dead. " Perhaps, Mr. Berry, we're being taught by brain- dead instructors. Tom Granahan Philadelphia.
NEWS
January 10, 2001 | By Milagros M. Padilla
This message is for drug addicts to let you know that we do care, and even though we walk past you without showing feelings, concern is in our hearts. Let's take a closer look. The addict gets a craving for drugs. He gets the drug without really consulting with his brain. In Spanish, one would say, "I need la cura, mannn. " He thinks that by getting the drug (la cura means "the cure"), he is cured, but he is sadly mistaken because he is allowing the nervous system to get further addicted.
SPORTS
November 23, 2012 | Associated Press
SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico - Famed Puerto Rican boxer Hector "Macho" Camacho is clinically brain dead, doctors said Thursday. They said family members were disagreeing on whether to take him off life support. Dr. Ernesto Torres said doctors have finished performing all medical tests on Camacho, who was shot in the face Tuesday night. "We have done everything we could," said Torres, who is the director of the Centro Medico trauma center. "We have to tell the people of Puerto Rico and the entire world that Macho Camacho has died, he is brain dead.
NEWS
May 13, 2002 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Thousands of psychiatrists and other experts on the brain and behavior will descend on Center City over the next two weeks for three professional meetings that illustrate the breadth of modern psychiatry. The groups will discuss everything from intensive talk therapy to the chemistry and structure of the brain to the interaction of biology and experience. Philadelphia will play host this week to the American Psychoanalytic Association and the Society of Biological Psychiatry and, starting on the weekend, the American Psychiatric Association, holding the world's largest psychiatric meeting.
NEWS
August 27, 1996 | by Don Rubin, Special to the Daily News
Athletes stretch. Musicians tune up. You don't just jump into a car and stomp on the gas. OK, maybe you do. But it's probably a better idea to warm up the engine first. Here are some exercises designed to do that for your brain, in preparation for the impending school year. Good luck. (The answers are printed upside down. We don't need to tell you that cheating is way uncool.) 1. Each of the symbols in this simple division problem stands for a number from zero to nine.
NEWS
September 16, 2013 | By Leila Haghighat, Inquirer Staff Writer
William Acosta lies asleep on an operating table at Jefferson University Hospital. A surgeon is drilling a pen-sized hole into his skull. Curiously, the OR begins to smell like sawdust. Doctors then reduce his anesthesia, and Acosta, his brain still open, wakes up. Over the next five hours, Acosta, 56, of Glenside, will be both a patient and a collaborator in his own brain care. By staying awake, he will help surgeons find the part of his brain involved in Parkinson's disease.
NEWS
November 3, 2013 | By Reuben Kramer, For The Inquirer
It's a scene that might be repeated dozens of times on Drexel University's campus today: A student, sitting at a table, eating pizza. But Annie Feng is different. The sophomore nibbles on a mini pizza while wearing a headband designed to measure her brain activity. And unlike many brain-imaging machines, this device can be used at a table. By monitoring the brains of people during meals, researchers hope to learn about the cognitive aspects of eating, and why some people stop at a single slice while others devour the pie. This portable device has sparked the interest of researchers worldwide.
SPORTS
January 7, 2005 | Daily News Wire Services
Connecticut freshman guard A.J. Price will miss the rest of the season undergoing treatment for a blood vessel abnormality in his brain, the school said yesterday. Price had an intracranial hemorrhage in October and spent several days in critical condition at Hartford Hospital. He was cleared to return to classes on Jan. 18, but his doctor said the abnormality will keep him out of practice and games for months. The condition is marked by masses of abnormal blood vessels that grow in the brain and malform into a mass capable of bleeding.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 1986 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
The star of Eliminators is something called a Mandroid, a human being who has had the right side of his brain removed. On the evidence, the two writers responsible for the film underwent the same surgery before embarking on their labors. Even by the humble standards established by previous vengeance sagas ending in -ators, Eliminators is as close to brain-dead as a movie can get. It rests on a question that has befuddled our best scholars: Is it possible to put a robot and a homicidal ninja in a pitched battle with a tribe of Neanderthals in contemporary Mexico without winding up with a very primitive movie?
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 6, 2015 | By Howard Gensler
IF "AMERICAN SNIPER" can fire a shot in the culture war, why not "Frozen"? "Frozen"? Yesterday morning, Steve Doocy , of "Fox and Friends," led off a segment on the megapopular animated movie with the basic premise that its intention was to emasculate men. (Actually, its intention was to sell a bazillion CDs, DVDs, costumes, coloring books, etc., but why let the free market interfere with Fox News silliness? Although it is true that male testicles get very small when they're frozen.)
SPORTS
February 6, 2015 | BY JEFF NEIBURG, For the Daily News
AVERY MARZ is stepping up and then off of an aerobic platform. Her left foot lands on the platform first and her right foot follows. She does this repeatedly as her physical therapist watches. Her mother, Mary Beth Schoellkopf, stands off to the side and watches intently. Marz, a Saint Joseph's freshman, is wearing a T-shirt from the basketball camp of women's coach Cindy Griffin, a pair of Jordan-brand basketball shorts, athletic shoes and a white headband to keep the sweat from trickling down on her face.
NEWS
February 2, 2015 | By Gloria Hochman, For The Inquirer
Every Sunday night after she steps out of her shower, 16-year-old Emma texts a nude selfie to her boyfriend. He has promised to destroy it within five minutes. Michael, 18, knows about the dangers of drinking and driving, but figures a couple of beers won't put him over the edge. After an evening of partying with friends, he tucks himself behind the wheel of the 1989 Honda Civic he borrowed from his brother. The police pick him up 30 minutes later for erratic driving. Alice, 14, who goes to a school for the academically talented, texts until 4 in the morning instead of studying for tomorrow's midterm science exam.
NEWS
February 1, 2015 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
A CLINICAL neuropsychologist testified yesterday that charter school founder Dorothy June Brown has mild brain damage consistent with early stages of Alzheimer's disease. Dr. Barbara Malamut's testimony contradicted that of three court-appointed mental-health experts who took the stand earlier in the week during a competency hearing to determine whether Brown, 77, is fit to stand retrial for allegedly defrauding four schools of $6.3 million and conspiring with other administrators to conceal the crimes.
NEWS
January 22, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
Years of "chair shots," "flying head butts," "facebreakers," and "cobra clutch slams" have left former professional wrestlers with long-term brain injuries to which the sport's dominant circuit has continuously turned a blind eye, two ex-wrestlers allege in a proposed class-action suit filed in Philadelphia. The plaintiffs in the suit filed late last week - who include a cross-dressing Italian who wrestled under the name Skull von Krush - say Stamford, Conn.-based World Wrestling Entertainment encouraged them to take risks it knew could permanently affect their well-being while offering them no health or disability insurance.
NEWS
January 19, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
The darkened room at Drexel University contains a 120-inch projection screen, a bunch of high-end 3-D glasses, and a custom-built computer with enough memory to make your laptop seem like a toaster oven. State-of-the-art equipment, in other words, for racing through a fantasy world to gun down virtual foes. Andrew R. Cohen and Eric Wait use it for something they find much more interesting: traveling through the brain of a mouse. The Drexel engineers and their colleagues have applied video-game technology to let biologists analyze and watch movies of the formation of brain cells - though the phrase "watch movies" hardly does it justice.
NEWS
January 3, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Everybody knows it's really hard for smokers to quit. Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania think a quick brain scan could someday make quitting easier - or at least more effective. In a recent study, they found that certain changes in the brain, visible using technology that measures brain activity, predicted better than anything else now available which smokers would quickly relapse - that's most of them - and which might be able to quit without much more than a pep talk.
NEWS
December 7, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
For decades, researchers have been seeking a blood test that could diagnose a concussion and tell whether it is severe enough to cause lasting brain damage. In a big step toward that holy grail, University of Pennsylvania scientists have found that a blood protein called SNTF surged and stayed elevated in professional hockey players with persistent concussion symptoms, but not in players who recovered within a few days. "These results show that SNTF has promise as a blood biomarker for sports-related concussion," said Robert Siman, a research professor of neurosurgery at Penn and lead author of the study in last month's Journal of Neurotrauma.
NEWS
December 1, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tim Lynch has a theory about why he beat the brutal brain cancer glioblastoma. Even with intensive treatment, the average survival is about 15 months. As the tumor grows, it destroys the very abilities that define people as human - thinking, feeling, communicating. Brittany Maynard, who at age 29 became the face of the right-to-die movement, was so determined to cut short the inevitable horror that she ended her life with a lethal prescription this month in Oregon, 10 months after her glioblastoma diagnosis.
NEWS
November 16, 2014 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Chances are good you won't finish this article - at least not before you check your e-mail, send a text, or follow a tweet. As technological distractions beep and ping their way into our consciousness, plenty of evidence shows that multitasking can pump up anxiety levels, increase errors, reduce attention spans, and affect working memory. According to a study by Gloria Mark, a professor of informatics at the University of California, Irvine, the typical office worker gets only 11 minutes between each interruption, and it takes an average of 25 minutes to return to the original task after a distraction.
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