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Brain Activity

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NEWS
October 8, 2007 | By Pat Bernstein FOR THE INQUIRER
The boy cried almost every morning before going to kindergarten in Lower Merion, and he usually came home angry. His symptoms - inattention, impulsivity, extreme overreactivity, among others - led to a diagnosis of ADHD; the school suggested medication might be needed if his behavior didn't change. Dismissing that solution, his parents searched for alternatives and discovered neurofeedback, a little-known form of therapy that essentially trains you to maintain better control through exercises tailored to strengthen weak (abnormal)
NEWS
April 19, 1997 | By Shankar Vedantam, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
An Oregon stroke victim who showed no brain activity for at least six hours was revived by an experimental drug technique and is now walking, talking - and occasionally driving a tractor. The patient's doctors, who had feared he was brain-dead, say they now have what appears to be a powerful new treatment for brain clots. The case demonstrates the importance of getting stroke victims to the hospital quickly, they add. "I was still expecting to be talking to the family the next morning about organ donation, and instead I was talking to them about rehabilitation," said neurologist Wayne Clark, who treated the man when he was stricken last July.
NEWS
January 3, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Everybody knows it's really hard for smokers to quit. Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania think a quick brain scan could someday make quitting easier - or at least more effective. In a recent study, they found that certain changes in the brain, visible using technology that measures brain activity, predicted better than anything else now available which smokers would quickly relapse - that's most of them - and which might be able to quit without much more than a pep talk.
NEWS
October 23, 1986 | Daily News Wire Services
A radio traffic reporter died and her pilot was critically injured after their helicopter plummeted without warning yesterday into the Hudson River during a live radio report. "Hit the water!" screamed reporter Jane Dornacker, 40. She was pronounced dead at 8:22 p.m. EDT, some four hours after the helicopter carrying her and William Pate plunged into the Hudson off Manhattan's west side. The preliminary cause of her death was listed as drowning. More than a dozen passers-by jumped into the water to try to rescue the pair aboard the helicopter, which crashed near the USS Intrepid, a permanently docked aircraft carrier and museum, officials said.
NEWS
February 21, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
DOMENIC GRECO refused to let a crippling neurological disease that was eating away at his body and wracking him with terrible pain stop him from working. By the end, he was able to communicate only by blinking his eyes, the only movement that Lou Gehrig's disease had left him. When he lost his eyesight, he knew it was time to call it quits. He died Thursday at age 60. He lived in Fort Washington. The reason Domenic fought so hard was that he had work to do. His professional life had been devoted to helping people with such conditions as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)
NEWS
June 25, 2003 | By Connie Langland INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
These are heady times for researchers studying the causes of - and the cures for - dyslexia, a learning disability that may affect one in five readers. Researchers using magnetic resonance imaging technology to study brain activity in children have confirmed that there is a biological basis for reading disabilities, and they have pinpointed the brain regions that are activated as children learn to read. Moreover, researchers at leading brain-study centers have shown that intensive remedial efforts can improve reading ability.
NEWS
April 17, 2001 | by Leon Taylor Daily News Staff Writer
Her quick, bright smile, sunny disposition and eagerness to learn belied the life of hardship, heartache and healing she had lived. But through it all, 11-year-old Sabrina Allen wouldn't give up. Even yesterday, after doctors removed her from life support - making her the eighth fatality of a smoky fire in an illegal North Philadelphia rooming house - little Sabrina didn't give up. "We're going to donate her organs today," her oldest...
NEWS
February 19, 1988 | By Connie O'Kane, Special to The Inquirer
A Burlington County Superior Court judge yesterday rejected arguments that a convicted murderer should be given a new trial because doctors had turned off the victim's life-support system before brain death was proved. Defense attorney Mark Catanzaro had argued three weeks ago that Vernon Simmons, 27, had not been adequately represented by public defender Dennis Kuroishi at Simmons' 1985 trial because medical evidence about brain death had not been introduced. Simmons, a Pemberton resident, was convicted of killing Herman Bracey, 26, a few days after a drug deal went sour.
NEWS
February 10, 2010 | By Sam Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Montgomery County man was arrested yesterday and charged with the murder of his 10-week-old daughter, authorities said. Khalil Brown, 20, of Plymouth Meeting, told detectives that his daughter, Aniyah, was sleeping Jan. 28 when he picked her up and shook her for "less than five minutes," the Montgomery County District Attorney's Office said in a statement. After shaking the child, he told police "she just went dead and stopped moving," according to the statement. Brown allegedly described the shaking as "rough.
NEWS
September 8, 2006 | Daily News wire services
Former State Dept. employee: CIA leak was an accident The former No. 2 State Department official said yesterday that he inadvertently told two reporters about CIA employee Valerie Plame in 2003, confirming that he was the source of a leak that triggered a federal investigation. Former Deputy Secretary of State Richard Armitage apologized for his conversations with columnist Robert Novak and Washington Post reporter Bob Woodward. Armitage said he never intended to reveal Plame's identity.
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NEWS
January 3, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Everybody knows it's really hard for smokers to quit. Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania think a quick brain scan could someday make quitting easier - or at least more effective. In a recent study, they found that certain changes in the brain, visible using technology that measures brain activity, predicted better than anything else now available which smokers would quickly relapse - that's most of them - and which might be able to quit without much more than a pep talk.
NEWS
July 10, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
In an accelerated project announced Wednesday by the research arm of the Pentagon, University of Pennsylvania scientists will lead a complex national effort to treat memory impairment by delivering very small doses of electricity to the brain. The agency is funding the $22.5 million, four-year effort to seek treatments for the thousands of returning veterans who have suffered traumatic brain injury. A similar $15 million project is to be led by the University of California, Los Angeles.
NEWS
June 15, 2014 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Medical education is in a crisis. According to a study in the Annals of Internal Medicine, half of 4,287 students surveyed at seven medical schools experienced burnout and 10 percent expressed suicidal ideation. And doctors aren't much better off; a second study in JAMA Internal Medicine of 7,288 physicians showed that almost half had experienced some symptom of burnout. The public image of doctors hasn't fared well, either. While the popular notion of doctors was once the wise and avuncular Marcus Welby, M.D., more recent portrayals tend toward Dr. Gregory House, a brilliant but annoying know-it-all with a decided God complex.
NEWS
January 13, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
A man blowing cigarette smoke out of a hole in his neck. A blackened, diseased lung alongside a pink, healthy one. A bloody sore on the lips of a person with tobacco-stained teeth. No question the images are graphic and disturbing. But if printed on cigarette packs, would they reduce the rate of smoking? University of Pennsylvania scholars say they could, citing the results of their new study on smokers' brain activity. The images were among those proposed for use by the Food and Drug Administration but rejected by a federal court for violating the tobacco companies' First Amendment rights.
NEWS
February 21, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
DOMENIC GRECO refused to let a crippling neurological disease that was eating away at his body and wracking him with terrible pain stop him from working. By the end, he was able to communicate only by blinking his eyes, the only movement that Lou Gehrig's disease had left him. When he lost his eyesight, he knew it was time to call it quits. He died Thursday at age 60. He lived in Fort Washington. The reason Domenic fought so hard was that he had work to do. His professional life had been devoted to helping people with such conditions as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)
NEWS
January 29, 2013 | By Aron Heller, Associated Press
JERUSALEM - Seven years after a massive stroke removed him from office and left him in a vegetative state, former Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon is able to process information and has exhibited "robust activity" in his brain, according to doctors who conducted recent tests. Though some hoped Sharon might regain consciousness and resume his life, experts warned that was highly unlikely. The medical team that tested him last week said Monday that the scans showed Sharon, 84, responding to pictures of his family and recordings of his son's voice.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 2012 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Can a placebo relieve pain in rats? The logical answer is no, since the placebo effect involves beliefs, expectations, emotions - in a word, the mind. Rats don't have minds. But rats did indeed respond to a placebo in a University of Florida study, published in the October issue of Pain. "That was the big finding," said lead researcher John Neubert, a dentist and pain management specialist. "The animals that expected pain relief actually got pain relief when given an inert substance.
NEWS
October 24, 2010 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
The ache is deepest in the autumn, when the falling leaves and fading light remind Don and Kathy Farrell of the day that changed everything. On Oct. 27, 2007, their son Donnie, a 19-year-old Rowan University sophomore, was beaten and robbed by four or five men near a convenience store on campus. He died the next day at Cooper University Hospital in Camden. Despite a comprehensive, continuing investigation and a $100,000 reward, the suspects, including one apparently nicknamed "Smoke," seem to have vanished.
NEWS
February 10, 2010 | By Sam Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Montgomery County man was arrested yesterday and charged with the murder of his 10-week-old daughter, authorities said. Khalil Brown, 20, of Plymouth Meeting, told detectives that his daughter, Aniyah, was sleeping Jan. 28 when he picked her up and shook her for "less than five minutes," the Montgomery County District Attorney's Office said in a statement. After shaking the child, he told police "she just went dead and stopped moving," according to the statement. Brown allegedly described the shaking as "rough.
NEWS
October 8, 2007 | By Pat Bernstein FOR THE INQUIRER
The boy cried almost every morning before going to kindergarten in Lower Merion, and he usually came home angry. His symptoms - inattention, impulsivity, extreme overreactivity, among others - led to a diagnosis of ADHD; the school suggested medication might be needed if his behavior didn't change. Dismissing that solution, his parents searched for alternatives and discovered neurofeedback, a little-known form of therapy that essentially trains you to maintain better control through exercises tailored to strengthen weak (abnormal)
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