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Brain Cells

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NEWS
August 2, 1997 | By Stacia Friedman
I spend a lot of time at Philadelphia International Airport. I give friends rides when they go on business trips or vacations. When long-distance pals have layovers in Philly, I show up with Tastycakes, bottled water and aspirin. As a result, I know as much about airport parking as a Colombian drug lord. Until my last visit, however, I had no idea the airport was booby-trapped. I had spent an hour with an ex-boyfriend who was en route from Paris to L.A. I hadn't seen Jean Claude for years, and an hour was just enough time to reminisce without tiptoeing into conversational land mines.
NEWS
April 19, 1988 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Brain cells from an aborted fetus have been implanted into two Britons suffering from Parkinson's disease in a surgical procedure banned in the United States, according to doctors. The procedure was condemned by the Society for the Protection of Unborn Children in Britain, which said it amounted to the deliberate killing of unborn children for spare parts. The operations, performed on two men in March and April, were the first of their kind in Britain, said neurologist Edward Hitchcock, of the Midland Center for Neurosurgery and Neurology.
NEWS
July 2, 1998 | By Shankar Vedantam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For the first time ever, doctors have implanted artificial brain cells into a human, a 62-year-old stroke patient in Pittsburgh, opening the possibility of eventually treating people with brain disorders ranging from Parkinson's disease to Alzheimer's. The experimental procedure was fueled by research at the University of Pennsylvania, where neuroscientists John Trojanowski and Virginia Lee figured out a way to take certain cancer cells and turn them into brain cells. Scientists don't know yet whether transplanting brain cells - neurons - can reverse damage caused by stroke or any other brain disease.
NEWS
September 11, 2006 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For the millions of Americans who take drugs to treat mental illness, about the only way psychiatrists can tell whether the medications are working is through observation and asking patients how they feel. And even when doctors do find the right drugs, they can't explain exactly why the meds are effective. It's the glaring void at the heart of mental health treatment. No one, from the scientists developing drugs to those who prescribe them, is able to examine the diseased tissue: the cells of the human brain.
NEWS
April 3, 1997 | Daily News wire services
BOSTON Inflammation linked to heart attacks Inflammation that smolders for years inside the arteries, perhaps as a result of an infection, appears to be a powerful trigger of heart attacks and strokes and may even be as bad as too much cholesterol, a study has found. Researchers found that after several years of this low-level inflammation, men are three times as likely to suffer heart attacks and twice as likely to have strokes. The inflammation is so subtle that it shows up only on blood tests, and seemingly normal levels may be hazardous.
NEWS
February 11, 1993 | BY ALBERT J. PASQUARELLI
Neo-Nazism is alive and well in America. We can anticipate that the Clinton administration will initiate a renewed attack on the pre-born. Thousands of babies will be sacrificed as researchers pursue the quest of a "final solution" to the problems of Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, diabetes and several other diseases. With the justification that well, abortion is legal anyway, scientists will soon march in lockstep to the federal government to obtain funds for human fetal research and experimentation.
NEWS
September 22, 1995 | By Faye Flam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The nicotine a smoker gets from one cigarette sets off a burst of activity in brain cells, according to a report today in the journal Science. Neuroscientists say the finding is a major step in understanding what happens in the brain that makes nicotine so powerfully addictive. "We are beginning to get at the molecular mechanism of addiction," said neuroscientist Lorna Role, part of the team at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center that made the discovery. Eventually, an understanding of how nicotine acts on the brain could lead to a new way to kick the habit.
NEWS
April 16, 1990 | By Kurt Heine, Daily News Staff Writer
It doesn't take a brain scan to show that solvent-sniffers aren't as swift as they once were. You can see it in their behavior. Sniffers, known on the street as "huffers," have thinking problems. It shows up in increasing confusion and memory loss, experts say. But it can do worse things than that. It can lead to coma. And once in a while, it causes heart attacks. A 17-year-old Philadelphia huffer died last year. Experts on toxic substances say huffers of "tywol," short for the solvent toluene, like those who haunt the streets of Kensington, lose chunks of their brains with every whiff.
NEWS
October 22, 2008
Brian Forsyth is a lifelong Phillies fan who lives in Havertown The Phillies saved my life. Well, technically, a bicycle helmet saved my life. (Wear a helmet, everyone.) But the Phillies have helped heal the traumatic brain injury I suffered in a traffic accident in August 2007. The physical and emotional scars of that accident have required massive amounts of therapy. A lot of it has taken place at Citizens Bank Park. I attended the clinching 2007 season finale in a wheelchair, and I had to leave the game early due to overstimulation.
BUSINESS
November 26, 1991 | Daily News Wire Services
Dirty air may be taking over the job of the earth's damaged ozone layer. As you know, the ozone layer, which protects earth from the sun's damaging ultraviolet rays, has a big hole in it somewhere over the Antarctic. The protective layer is also shrinking over the United States and other temperate- zone nations - a trend that could mean more skin cancer and crop damage. But a recent survey by a team of University of Chicago researchers shows the situation isn't as bad as expected.
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NEWS
December 18, 2015
CHRISTINE FLOWERS and I are not always on the same page regarding religious and secular issues. However, I have great respect for her constancy regarding her beliefs and the ability to articulate them. That being said, we can only trust that the message of hope and welcome, recently voiced by young children singing Christmas songs, as told by Ms. Flowers, will remain steadfast as they grow. It won't be easy or assured. The message must survive the greed, narcissism and hate which we, as adults, continue to teach them by example.
NEWS
January 19, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
The darkened room at Drexel University contains a 120-inch projection screen, a bunch of high-end 3-D glasses, and a custom-built computer with enough memory to make your laptop seem like a toaster oven. State-of-the-art equipment, in other words, for racing through a fantasy world to gun down virtual foes. Andrew R. Cohen and Eric Wait use it for something they find much more interesting: traveling through the brain of a mouse. The Drexel engineers and their colleagues have applied video-game technology to let biologists analyze and watch movies of the formation of brain cells - though the phrase "watch movies" hardly does it justice.
NEWS
March 24, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two new studies by Philadelphia researchers drive home the potential importance of getting enough sleep if you want to keep your brain healthy. One from the University of Pennsylvania tied disrupted sleep - the equivalent of shift work - to the death of brain cells that are important for mood, thinking, attention span, and responding to stressful situations. One from Temple University found that two months of inadequate sleep led to impaired learning and memory as well as physical changes in the brain consistent with Alzheimer's disease.
NEWS
November 24, 2013 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Most people who get a concussion seem to regain normal brain function within a month or two at most. But doctors have no way to predict which patients are in that group and which will suffer long-term cognitive problems. A team from the University of Pennsylvania and Baylor College of Medicine seeks to solve that riddle with a simple blood test. In a new study in the journal Frontiers in Neurology, the team reported that a protein called SNTF is a promising indicator of which patients with concussions are likely to experience chronic brain deficits.
NEWS
April 16, 2013
By Ravi Parikh President Obama's 10-year "BRAIN Initiative" will bring together scientists from private and public institutions to investigate how the brain's 100 billion cells interact with each other. Many researchers believe that brain mapping could unlock the secrets behind complex diseases like Alzheimer's and autism. While some scientists praise BRAIN (it stands for Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies), others have criticized its chances of success and the price tag - $100 million in 2014 and up to $3 billion over the next decade.
NEWS
May 22, 2012 | Art Carey
What puzzles Harry Gaines is that we typically plan our vacations with more care than we plan the rest of our lives, especially when it comes to health and fitness. Too often we neglect to make the investment in exercise that will pay rich dividends in well-being in our 70s, 80s, and beyond. Gaines, 74, a retired textbook-publishing executive who lives half the year in Newtown, Bucks County, and the other half in Florida, keeps a "bucket list" — goals and experiences he hopes to accomplish before he kicks the proverbial bucket.
NEWS
March 5, 2012
Study: 'Chemo brain' may not go away for cancer patients Chemotherapy patients have long complained of the mental fog that tends to accompany treatment. Now, a new study suggests that certain combinations of chemo drugs may have long-term effects on cognition. Researchers looked at 196 women who had been treated for early-stage breast cancer with a three-drug chemotherapy regimen. The women underwent cognition testing an average of 21 years after they had received chemo.
NEWS
August 19, 2011
BACHMANN???? I am puzzled. What is up with the Republican Party's enthusiasm for Michele Bachmann? Are they for real out there in the Midwest, or are they just plain ignorant? Do they want to hand Obama another four years in the White House so he can push forth his failing policies of being a reactionary president, a follower of the tides? I want a proactive president, a true leader, and a person who has a spine. After Bachmann's triumphant victory in the straw poll, I have to say that I am no longer a member of the Republican Party.
NEWS
October 5, 2010 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Four Eagles games, four concussions - the latest two suffered by wide receiver Riley Cooper and cornerback Asante Samuel on Sunday. Coach Andy Reid said Monday that their injuries "seem to be mild," but that word seem is telling. From a scientific perspective, no one really knows. Physicians can see when someone's outward symptoms have returned to normal, as most do within a few weeks. But there is no lab test to measure internal damage from a concussion and no medicine to treat it. "Absolutely nobody knows when it's safe to go back in," said Douglas H. Smith, director of the University of Pennsylvania's Center for Brain Injury and Repair.
NEWS
June 5, 2010
AS BABIES, kids engage in an ongoing terror campaign that is designed to drive their parents insane. They employ an ingenious array of weapons that includes bed-wetting, regurgitation and, in the case of boys, projectile urination. It's all very disgusting, but they are so cute that we love them anyway. As kids grow older, their techniques change, but their goal is the same: They are intent on diminishing their parents' mental capacity. By doing so, they set up a dynamic that will someday allow them to go buck wild as their parents sit drooling in a corner.
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