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Brain Damage

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SPORTS
February 6, 2004 | Daily News Wire Services
Jockey Michael Rowland was in critical condition yesterday, 1 day after being involved in a three-horse spill at Turfway Park in Florence, Ky. Rowland's agent, Mike Greenfield, said he was told by the jockey's family that Rowland was in a coma and had brain damage. "It's not looking good," Greenfield said. "But from what I've heard, even the best-case scenario is not going to be really good. " Rowland had surgery Wednesday night, but the extent of his injuries was not immediately known, a track spokesman said.
NEWS
October 24, 1989 | By Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
When asked in a recent psychiatric interview who was president and who was mayor, demolition contractor and reputed mob associate Ralph "Big Ralph" Costobile replied, Ronald Reagan and Frank Rizzo. Nor could the 46-year old contractor, who owns Big Ralph's Saloon on Passyunk Avenue, remember his age or address, his psychiatrist reported. With Costobile facing trial for racketeering and the defense contending he suffers from brain damage stemming from an infected foot, the psychiatrist's report yesterday led to an unusual joint request by Strike Force prosecutor Barry Gross and Costobile's defense attorney, Edward Reif.
SPORTS
February 29, 2000 | Daily News Wire Services
Former heavyweight champion Riddick Bowe should receive a reduced sentence because he was brain-damaged when he pleaded guilty to abducting his wife and five children, attorney Johnnie Cochran told a judge yesterday in Charlotte, N.C. Under the plea agreement, Bowe faces a sentence of 18 to 24 months in prison. Cochran told Mullen Bowe, 32, suffers from a mental disorder caused by blows to the head during his years of fighting. He said Bowe and his defense lawyers were unaware of his mental problems when he agreed to plead guilty.
NEWS
November 22, 2000 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
Karen Burton-Lister's obstetrician went on vacation the day before she went into labor in October 1990. Two of his partners apparently weren't aware of her need for a Caesarean section birth, said attorneys Gustine J. Pelagatti and Alisa Marion yesterday. They should have checked the records, the lawyers said. Burton-Lister's daughter was born with brain damage. The mother sued. A jury has awarded Burton-Lister $2 million on behalf of her daughter, now 10. The panel deliberated about two hours before returning the verdict to Common Pleas Judge Mary D. Colins.
NEWS
February 25, 2000 | By Faye Flam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Philadelphia neurologist has invented a vaccine aimed at preventing brain damage from stroke. Matthew During of Thomas Jefferson University and a team of scientists report in today's issue of Science that when they gave the vaccine to rats and then induced a stroke, it appeared to reduce the death of brain tissue by about 70 percent. The vaccine is not designed to prevent strokes but is meant to protect the brain against some of the permanent damage that often leaves people paralyzed or impaired in their speech or memory.
NEWS
May 4, 2010
The Philadelphia Housing Authority will pay the family of a girl $9.68 million to settle a lawsuit prompted by brain damage she sustained when mold in her public housing apartment triggered an asthma attack. Ebony Gage, now 16, was 12 when the episode occurred at the apartment in Frankford. Attorneys for the family claimed that PHA was aware of the condition, continued to pay the landlord full rent, and required the family to give 30 days' notice before it could vacate the apartment. It was during that time Gage had the asthma attack.
NEWS
April 26, 1987 | By Jodi Spiegel, Special to The Inquirer
Two-year-old Jonathan Braccio needs a lot of help. It became apparent four months after his birth in February 1985 that the brown-haired, brown-eyed Cherry Hill child had suffered severe brain damage. Now, in an effort to remedy the damage, Jonathan is undergoing patterning therapy - a series of repeated exercises designed to teach the undamaged portions of his brain to take over for the parts that previously controlled his sight, movement, sensation and coordination. The therapy is being provided entirely by his family and volunteers.
NEWS
September 12, 2000 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
Child counselor Maria Rosa Primus, 25, wanted to show a young boy she cared. So Primus left her Northeast Philadelphia home shortly before 7 p.m. on Aug. 9, 1999, and drove toward a roller skating rink to be with the boy she was counseling. But on the way, a car driven by a drunken driver plowed into her car on Roosevelt Boulevard near Comly Road and almost killed her. Primus, of Summerdale Avenue near Hartel, suffered brain damage and remains in a vegetative state at a nursing home, said Assistant District Attorney Guy Garant.
BUSINESS
February 23, 1987 | By Ron Wolf, Inquirer Staff Writer
A potential drug identified by researchers at Merck Sharp & Dohme laboratories in West Point might be useful in reducing damage to the brain caused by an interruption in the supply of oxygen. Such damage most often occurs when a heart attack or stroke disrupts the flow of blood to the brain. The substance, known as MK-801, originally was considered as a possible anti-convulsive agent for the control of epilepsy. That prospect was dampened, however, when tests conducted by Merck researchers indicated that the substance could not be administered orally.
NEWS
August 29, 1990 | BY LARRY MCMULLEN
Evelyn Donley got chills when she read about Rachel Tierney and Kristen Daniels. It was her son Peter's story all over again. Rachel, Kristen and Peter each suffered brain damage as babies after running a high fever and falling into a coma. In all three cases, doctors never could explain what caused the virus that led to the fever. The only real difference is that Rachel Tierney and Kristen Daniels still are babies. Peter Donley is 16 years old. His case goes back to 1978.
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NEWS
October 24, 2014 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Is she dead or isn't she? Jahi McMath, 13, was declared brain-dead in December after her heart temporarily stopped during a tonsillectomy in Oakland, Calif. The tragedy drew national attention when the girl's mother, Nailah Winkfield, persuaded a judge in January to allow her to remove the body from the hospital, still on life support. The mother brought the girl to New Jersey, where the law allows a family to refuse to remove life support from brain-dead patients for religious reasons.
NEWS
July 26, 2014 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian and Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writers
The family of a pregnant Fairhill woman who died in 2012 after a fall at her parents' home sued the city Thursday, contending her death and her child's severe brain damage resulted from paramedic malpractice and defective equipment. The suit was filed in Common Pleas Court by Eriberto Rodriguez, widower of Joanne Rodriguez; their 21-month-old son, Xavier; and maternal grandmother Daisy Morales. "My wife should be alive today. My son should be healthy, growing, playing, laughing.
NEWS
April 14, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Donna didn't expect that things would be easy after her husband Richard suffered the double whammy of a blood infection and a stroke a year ago. But it was a surprise that the emotional damage from the stroke was more disturbing than his physical disabilities. He could no longer plan his days and didn't fully understand his limitations. What hurt her most, though, was that her feelings seemed to mean nothing to him. "I think a 5-year-old probably had more empathy than he did," said Donna, 56, of Rosemont.
NEWS
February 9, 2014 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA Calling the conduct "unspeakable sexual depravity and brutality," a Philadelphia judge Friday sentenced a Hunting Park man to 50 to 100 years in prison for raping and severely beating a 3-year-old girl and a 2-year-old boy, both the children of his girlfriends. The case of Julio Esquilin, 25, was described as "the worst I've ever seen" by prosecutor James Carpenter, chief of the District Attorney's Office's Family Violence and Sexual Assault Unit. Carpenter said sexual offenders who assault toddlers are rare, and rarer still are those who also beat their victims.
NEWS
February 9, 2014 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-568-8278
JULIO ESQUILIN had nothing to say in court yesterday before a Philadelphia judge sentenced him to 50 to 100 years in state prison for savagely raping and beating two young children. Esquilin, 25, of Frankford, attacked the children in fall 2011, sending them to the hospital in critical condition. Both were the children of his two girlfriends. In September that year, Esquilin victimized a 3-year-old girl, knocking her front teeth out and raping her so severely that she suffered massive bleeding, Assistant District Attorney James Carpenter told Common Pleas Judge Denis P. Cohen during a sentencing hearing.
NEWS
January 23, 2014 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
WEST CHESTER A Chester County Court jury has awarded $32.8 million to a 4-year-old girl, concluding that she suffered brain damage at birth because nurses at Phoenixville Hospital failed to alert doctors about changes in her condition. After a two-week trial, the jury on Friday found two nurses were negligent when they waited 13 minutes to tell doctors that Lilly Ciechoski's heart rate had dropped, the family's lawyer said. The same jury found that a third nurse and the hospital were not to blame for the girl's injuries.
SPORTS
November 10, 2013 | By Stan Hochman, Daily News Columnist
RON JAWORSKI faded back to pass. Peered downfield waiting for a sliver of daylight between receiver and defender. Drifted right, still searching. Thousand-and-two, thousand-and-three, thousand-and- pow ! This was Oct. 26, 1980, against the Bears, at Veterans Stadium. Jaworski never saw Mike Hartenstine. Never heard him, never sensed him. In boxing, the punches that do the most damage are the ones you don't see coming. Pow! Hartenstine speared Jaworski from behind, planting his helmet in the middle of the 7 on Jaworski's back.
SPORTS
November 1, 2013 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
JRUE HOLIDAY was traded to the Pelicans in the offseason but he'll always be a Sixer at heart. We know that because on Wednesday night he made a bit of a gaffe while warming up the crowd before New Orleans' home opener against the Pacers. "Yo, how you doing Pelicans fans?" asked Holiday. "On behalf of myself and the Sixers we want to welcome you all to the first Pelicans game this year. Yo, let's turn it up. We have a great city and we're so excited so let's turn up. C'mon!" You could tell he wasn't in Philly because the Pelicans fans still gave him a thunderous ovation.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2013 | By Ellen Gray
* FRONTLINE. LEAGUE OF DENIAL: THE NFL'S CONCUSSION CRISIS. 9 tonight, WHYY12.   HALL OF FAMER Harry Carson has a 3-year-old grandson who won't be playing football if Carson has anything to say about it. "I've told his mom, my daughter, that he's not going to play football. And his father has bought in," the retired New York Giants linebacker told reporters this summer during a news conference in Beverly Hills, Calif., for PBS' "Frontline" investigation "League of Denial: The NFL's Concussion Crisis.
NEWS
July 1, 2013 | By Dr. Daniel Taylor, For The Inquirer
Recently, a frantic mother brought her 18-month-old son to our clinic with a fever of 103. Her anxiety over the child's fever was palpable, yet the boy's demeanor and his normal physical exam portrayed the opposite. After explaining that his fever was his body's normal response and that he probably did not need antibiotics, his mother looked at me pensively and said, "But he still has a fever. He's going to get a seizure. What are you going to do about it?" Raise your hand if you think a fever of 105 can cause brain damage.
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