CollectionsBrain Damage
IN THE NEWS

Brain Damage

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
February 6, 2004 | Daily News Wire Services
Jockey Michael Rowland was in critical condition yesterday, 1 day after being involved in a three-horse spill at Turfway Park in Florence, Ky. Rowland's agent, Mike Greenfield, said he was told by the jockey's family that Rowland was in a coma and had brain damage. "It's not looking good," Greenfield said. "But from what I've heard, even the best-case scenario is not going to be really good. " Rowland had surgery Wednesday night, but the extent of his injuries was not immediately known, a track spokesman said.
NEWS
October 24, 1989 | By Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
When asked in a recent psychiatric interview who was president and who was mayor, demolition contractor and reputed mob associate Ralph "Big Ralph" Costobile replied, Ronald Reagan and Frank Rizzo. Nor could the 46-year old contractor, who owns Big Ralph's Saloon on Passyunk Avenue, remember his age or address, his psychiatrist reported. With Costobile facing trial for racketeering and the defense contending he suffers from brain damage stemming from an infected foot, the psychiatrist's report yesterday led to an unusual joint request by Strike Force prosecutor Barry Gross and Costobile's defense attorney, Edward Reif.
SPORTS
February 29, 2000 | Daily News Wire Services
Former heavyweight champion Riddick Bowe should receive a reduced sentence because he was brain-damaged when he pleaded guilty to abducting his wife and five children, attorney Johnnie Cochran told a judge yesterday in Charlotte, N.C. Under the plea agreement, Bowe faces a sentence of 18 to 24 months in prison. Cochran told Mullen Bowe, 32, suffers from a mental disorder caused by blows to the head during his years of fighting. He said Bowe and his defense lawyers were unaware of his mental problems when he agreed to plead guilty.
NEWS
November 22, 2000 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
Karen Burton-Lister's obstetrician went on vacation the day before she went into labor in October 1990. Two of his partners apparently weren't aware of her need for a Caesarean section birth, said attorneys Gustine J. Pelagatti and Alisa Marion yesterday. They should have checked the records, the lawyers said. Burton-Lister's daughter was born with brain damage. The mother sued. A jury has awarded Burton-Lister $2 million on behalf of her daughter, now 10. The panel deliberated about two hours before returning the verdict to Common Pleas Judge Mary D. Colins.
NEWS
February 25, 2000 | By Faye Flam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Philadelphia neurologist has invented a vaccine aimed at preventing brain damage from stroke. Matthew During of Thomas Jefferson University and a team of scientists report in today's issue of Science that when they gave the vaccine to rats and then induced a stroke, it appeared to reduce the death of brain tissue by about 70 percent. The vaccine is not designed to prevent strokes but is meant to protect the brain against some of the permanent damage that often leaves people paralyzed or impaired in their speech or memory.
NEWS
May 4, 2010
The Philadelphia Housing Authority will pay the family of a girl $9.68 million to settle a lawsuit prompted by brain damage she sustained when mold in her public housing apartment triggered an asthma attack. Ebony Gage, now 16, was 12 when the episode occurred at the apartment in Frankford. Attorneys for the family claimed that PHA was aware of the condition, continued to pay the landlord full rent, and required the family to give 30 days' notice before it could vacate the apartment. It was during that time Gage had the asthma attack.
NEWS
April 26, 1987 | By Jodi Spiegel, Special to The Inquirer
Two-year-old Jonathan Braccio needs a lot of help. It became apparent four months after his birth in February 1985 that the brown-haired, brown-eyed Cherry Hill child had suffered severe brain damage. Now, in an effort to remedy the damage, Jonathan is undergoing patterning therapy - a series of repeated exercises designed to teach the undamaged portions of his brain to take over for the parts that previously controlled his sight, movement, sensation and coordination. The therapy is being provided entirely by his family and volunteers.
NEWS
February 1, 2015 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
A CLINICAL neuropsychologist testified yesterday that charter school founder Dorothy June Brown has mild brain damage consistent with early stages of Alzheimer's disease. Dr. Barbara Malamut's testimony contradicted that of three court-appointed mental-health experts who took the stand earlier in the week during a competency hearing to determine whether Brown, 77, is fit to stand retrial for allegedly defrauding four schools of $6.3 million and conspiring with other administrators to conceal the crimes.
NEWS
September 12, 2000 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
Child counselor Maria Rosa Primus, 25, wanted to show a young boy she cared. So Primus left her Northeast Philadelphia home shortly before 7 p.m. on Aug. 9, 1999, and drove toward a roller skating rink to be with the boy she was counseling. But on the way, a car driven by a drunken driver plowed into her car on Roosevelt Boulevard near Comly Road and almost killed her. Primus, of Summerdale Avenue near Hartel, suffered brain damage and remains in a vegetative state at a nursing home, said Assistant District Attorney Guy Garant.
BUSINESS
February 23, 1987 | By Ron Wolf, Inquirer Staff Writer
A potential drug identified by researchers at Merck Sharp & Dohme laboratories in West Point might be useful in reducing damage to the brain caused by an interruption in the supply of oxygen. Such damage most often occurs when a heart attack or stroke disrupts the flow of blood to the brain. The substance, known as MK-801, originally was considered as a possible anti-convulsive agent for the control of epilepsy. That prospect was dampened, however, when tests conducted by Merck researchers indicated that the substance could not be administered orally.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 31, 2015 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Three million Americans have some form of epilepsy; in 68 percent of the cases the cause remains unknown. More than a third of patients with uncontrollable seizures are not effectively treated with current therapies, which are often prescribed on a trial-and-error basis. Now, the Epilepsy Genetic Initiative will offer a project to uncover the causes, develop precision treatments, and design possible cures for epilepsies at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and seven other academic medical centers.
NEWS
February 11, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
Recanting critical parts of a statement he made to detectives as a 16-year-old, the son of accused child-killer Margarita Garabito told a Philadelphia jury on Monday that his mother never hit or raised her voice at her 10-year-old stepdaughter. According to his signed statement of Oct. 21, 2009, to homicide detectives, Omar Jose Lorenzo said he heard the sound of "slapping" coming from Charlenni Ferreira's bedroom after his mother went in to discipline the girl. Lorenzo's statement also says he told detectives he saw his mother take a broom into Charlenni's bedroom to discipline her and then heard the girl crying.
NEWS
February 5, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ten-year-old Charlenni Ferreira died more than five years ago, but the only thing that's certain is that her life was a living hell of beatings and sexual abuse. On Tuesday, a Philadelphia Common Pleas Court jury began hearing evidence to decide whether she was killed by her stepmother, her father, or both. Seated at the defense table is the girl's stepmother, Margarita Garabito, 48, who a prosecutor said hated her new husband's child. "She hated this child and she wanted this child dead and out of her life," Assistant District Attorney Andrew Notaristefano told the jury of seven men and five women in his opening statement.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2015
RECENTLY, football has become a hot topic among some of my mom friends. Many can't wait to sign up their 5- and 6-year-old sons to play the game. Much to everyone's surprise, when I was asked about when my son, Darius, would start playing football, I responded with an emphatic, "No, nada, nope. Not happening. Not on my watch. " "What, Miss Fitness?" someone said, with a tinge of sarcasm. "And just why don't you want your son to play football?" Well, for starters, I parried back: "Why in the world would I consciously encourage my son to participate in the most violent sport in the world, which, by the way, also has a high probability of leaving him broke, broken and brain damaged?"
NEWS
February 1, 2015 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
A CLINICAL neuropsychologist testified yesterday that charter school founder Dorothy June Brown has mild brain damage consistent with early stages of Alzheimer's disease. Dr. Barbara Malamut's testimony contradicted that of three court-appointed mental-health experts who took the stand earlier in the week during a competency hearing to determine whether Brown, 77, is fit to stand retrial for allegedly defrauding four schools of $6.3 million and conspiring with other administrators to conceal the crimes.
SPORTS
November 21, 2014 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
With the NFL and the ex-players who support its nearly $1 billion settlement on the defense Wednesday and those seeking its rejection on the attack, the ongoing legal skirmish over the league's concussion agreement headed into overtime. The long day of testimony in Courtroom 7-B of Philadelphia's federal courthouse was aimed at determining the fairness of the settlement. Senior U.S. District Court Judge Anita Brody, who granted conditional approval this summer after the NFL agreed to lift its cap on damages, has yet to decide on the agreement's fate.
NEWS
November 8, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ellen Lieber, 54, of Medford, who survived brain surgery when she was 6, and subsequent disability, to work as a teacher's assistant at Tots Cooperative Nursery School in Moorestown from 1980 to 2005, died of a stroke Wednesday, Nov. 5, at her home. "She was an unusually brilliant child," her mother, Marlene, said, "but when she started school, she started having problems - falling, dropping things. "I took her to a psychologist and he said, 'Her IQ is 140 and she has organic brain damage.' " "After surgery and radiation," Marlene Lieber said, "they told me there was no hope and there was three months to live.
NEWS
October 24, 2014 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Is she dead or isn't she? Jahi McMath, 13, was declared brain-dead in December after her heart temporarily stopped during a tonsillectomy in Oakland, Calif. The tragedy drew national attention when the girl's mother, Nailah Winkfield, persuaded a judge in January to allow her to remove the body from the hospital, still on life support. The mother brought the girl to New Jersey, where the law allows a family to refuse to remove life support from brain-dead patients for religious reasons.
NEWS
July 26, 2014 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian and Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writers
The family of a pregnant Fairhill woman who died in 2012 after a fall at her parents' home sued the city Thursday, contending her death and her child's severe brain damage resulted from paramedic malpractice and defective equipment. The suit was filed in Common Pleas Court by Eriberto Rodriguez, widower of Joanne Rodriguez; their 21-month-old son, Xavier; and maternal grandmother Daisy Morales. "My wife should be alive today. My son should be healthy, growing, playing, laughing.
NEWS
April 14, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Donna didn't expect that things would be easy after her husband Richard suffered the double whammy of a blood infection and a stroke a year ago. But it was a surprise that the emotional damage from the stroke was more disturbing than his physical disabilities. He could no longer plan his days and didn't fully understand his limitations. What hurt her most, though, was that her feelings seemed to mean nothing to him. "I think a 5-year-old probably had more empathy than he did," said Donna, 56, of Rosemont.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|