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Brain Damage

NEWS
May 9, 2012 | By Mensah M. Dean, Daily News Staff Writer
DURING HIS closing argument Tuesday in the trial of Sabina Rose O'Donnell's alleged killer, a city prosecutor seized on DNA evidence that linked Donte Johnson to her 2010 rape and murder. A defense attorney, for his part, said that the "feeble-minded" Johnson may have been "one can short of a sixpack" but that he was not guilty. The arguments, delivered to a packed Philadelphia courtroom, were followed by jury instructions from Common Pleas Judge Glenn Bronson. The jury deliberated for about two hours before going home for the day. Johnson, 20, is accused of stalking the 20-year-old Northern Liberties waitress as she rode a borrowed bicycle home on Girard Avenue early on June 2, 2010.
NEWS
May 8, 2012 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Donte Johnson is 20 years old, but the way he thinks, communicates, and copes with problems is more in line with the mind of child, according to a forensic neuropsychologist who testified in Johnson's murder trial Monday. Johnson, accused in the June 2010 rape and slaying of Sabina Rose O'Donnell, has an IQ in the 70s, which places him on the borderline of what is considered "mentally retarded," said Gerald Cooke, who administered a series of tests to Johnson this year. "He's basically in that 11- to 12-year-old range in terms of his intellectual functioning," Cooke said.
NEWS
May 1, 2012 | By Mensah M. Dean, Daily News Staff Writer
In a low but steady voice, Donte Johnson on Monday rejected an offer from the District Attorney's Office to plead guilty and receive a life-without-parole prison sentence in the June 2010 rape and murder of Sabina Rose O'Donnell, the 20-year-old Northern Liberties woman whose slaying behind her apartment building rocked the trendy community. Johnson, 20, of 11th Street near Poplar, rejected the same offer in December 2010, when city prosecutors were talking about seeking the death penalty against him. They've since opted not to pursue the death penalty, which means Johnson, ironically, would face a life sentence if a jury finds him guilty of first-degree murder.
NEWS
April 28, 2012
William Lawlis Pace, 103, who held the Guinness World Record for living the longest with a bullet in his head, died in his sleep Monday at a Turlock, Calif., nursing home. His death came 94 years and six months after his older brother accidentally shot him with their father's .22-caliber rifle in 1917. Mr. Pace learned in 2006 that he had been crowned the world record-holder in the category of unwanted cranial ammunition. His son told a newspaper during a birthday party for his father last year that doctors in Mr. Pace's native Texas left the bullet in place because they worried that surgery might cause brain damage.
NEWS
February 25, 2012
Prime minister in Haiti resigns PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti - Haitian Prime Minister Garry Conille abruptly resigned Friday after less than five months on the job in a political setback for President Michel Martelly, whose struggle to fill the top government post has hampered earthquake reconstruction and other development efforts. The government announced Conille's resignation in a brief statement and said Martelly would address the nation in televised speech. The president did not immediately announce his proposed replacement for the top administrative post in the government.
NEWS
February 22, 2012 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 2006, when John Whyte first started studying the remarkable effect that the sleep medicine Ambien can have on people with severe brain damage, he hoped the drug might be a miracle treatment. Six years later, Ambien's ability to rouse some people from oblivion remains tantalizingly mysterious. But Whyte, director of the Moss Rehabilitation Research Institute in Elkins Park, no longer sees the drug as a potentially dramatic improvement in care. Now he sees something far more complex.
SPORTS
February 4, 2012
Sorry, Los Angeles. The only NFL expansion happening anytime soon is to next season's schedule of Thursday night games. During his annual Super Bowl news conference, Commissioner Roger Goodell said Friday there hasn't been any discussion about adding to the league's 32 teams, and indicated he's not too keen about the idea of shifting a franchise, either. "I don't see that in the foreseeable future," Goodell said. "We want to keep our teams where they are. We believe that's healthier for the league in the long term.
NEWS
October 4, 2011 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Insisting he stabbed his ex-girlfriend in the throat "by accident" and police were "lying through their teeth," a North Philadelphia man was found guilty today of first-degree murder and sentenced to life in prison for a 2008 murder witnesses called a "scene from a horror movie. " "I don't see how the evidence added up to the way it added up to, but it don't seem right," Solomon Carter told Philadelphia Common Pleas Court Judge Jeffrey P. Minehart before he was sentenced. Minehart, after a 1-1/2-day nonjury trial, found Carter guilty of first-degree murder in the Oct. 12, 2008 slaying of ex-girlfriend Karimah Ballard, 32. Trial witnesses testified that Carter, 31, was intoxicated and using the illegal stimulant PCP at 3 a.m. when he erupted in rage after Ballard ordered him to leave her apartment in the 1600 block of North 16th Street.
SPORTS
May 23, 2011
Cut back the interleague series High&Inside always has been a big fan of interleague play, considering the games against the Yankees and Red Sox (and this weekend, the Rangers) a valuable tool for gauging the Phillies abilities against the AL contenders. For example, it's instructive to note that every NL East team lost to an AL counterpart on Sunday. But most observers think there are too many interleague games. So here's a suggestion: Cut it from 18 games to six against real rivals, and play them all immediately before the all-star break.
SPORTS
May 3, 2011 | Associated Press
With its players again barred from work, the NFL told a federal appeals court Monday the fight over whether the lockout is legal won't get in the way of the 2011 season. The rest of the labor fight? That's anyone's guess. The league filed an 18-page brief with the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit in St. Louis, arguing that the lockout should remain in effect permanently while appeals play out. The appeals court put U.S. District Judge Susan Richard Nelson's order lifting the 45-day lockout on hold temporarily last week.
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