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Brain Development

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NEWS
May 20, 2011 | By Faye Flam, Inquirer Staff Writer
It may not have been survival of the smartest but of the keenest sniffers that pushed the brains of early mammals to grow far bigger and more complex than those of their reptilian ancestors. A group of paleontologists announced Friday that they had used CT scanning to analyze the skulls of ancient creatures on the evolutionary path to becoming mammals, and found most of the brain growth occurred in the smell center - the olfactory bulb. "We associate the brain's primary function with thinking," said Zhe-Xi Luo, a paleontologist at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History in Pittsburgh, who was part of the team.
LIVING
March 6, 2000 | By Susan FitzGerald, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Classical music for babies. Foreign language tapes for toddlers. Today's parents are trying all sorts of things to stimulate their children in the hopes of maximizing brain power in the critical period right after birth. But do experiences in the early years - listening to Mozart or not - really determine how a child fares in the long run? In his 1999 book, The Myth of the First Three Years: A New Understanding of Early Brain Development and Lifelong Learning, child-education expert John Bruer debunks the popular notion that the most important period of brain development occurs before the age of 3. Bruer, who heads the James S. McDonnell Foundation in St. Louis, will join a panel of Philadelphia experts to discuss the "zero-to-three" theory at a symposium next Monday from 1 to 3:30 p.m. at Temple University.
NEWS
December 12, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The scenes are too common for comfort: A mother grabs her daughter's arm roughly on the bus. A father at a Wawa growls coarsely into his son's ear. Not legally defined as child abuse, it's known as harsh or authoritarian parenting. Regardless of race or income level, mothers and fathers everywhere are capable of it. But low-income parents who struggle with stresses from overwhelming issues such as hunger, or lack of a job or adequate housing, seem to engage in harsh parenting more often, researchers have concluded.
LIVING
August 21, 2000 | Kelly Woo, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Doctors often look for what is wrong in their patients. Now a new study will look at what is right. In the fall, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia will participate in a comprehensive six-year national study - the first of its kind - of normal brain development in children, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The seven sites in the study, funded by the National Institutes of Health, will pool data from 500 children of all ages to establish standard anatomical measurements of normal, developing brains.
NEWS
July 3, 2012 | By Dana DiFilippo and Daily News Staff Writer
TYRONE JONES was 16 when, police say, he shot another boy in a gang-related execution in North Philadelphia. Jones is now 56 and one of the longest-serving of Pennsylvania's juvenile lifers, having spent his entire adult life behind bars. On Monday, he became among the first in the state to seek a new sentence under last week's landmark Supreme Court decision declaring mandatory life-in-prison sentences unconstitutional for juveniles. "What [the high court's ruling]
NEWS
February 20, 2012
The behavioral symptoms that define disorders on the autism spectrum sometimes start to emerge as early as 12 months of age. But often, a firm diagnosis is not made until a child is 2 or older. What if you could predict autism when a child was just 6 months old? New research using sophisticated brain scans suggests this may one day be possible, enabling high-risk infants to be targeted for early intervention and treatment. The research, conducted by scientists at seven institutions, including Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, was published online last week in the American Journal of Psychiatry.
NEWS
May 21, 2014
RE: "TAPPED OUT" series: I know about poverty. I was a caseworker for a few years in the 1970s. No one gets rich off welfare. Reagan spun this myth in the 1960s to get ignorant people comfortable with their prejudices and bigotry, and it still works. Those of us who are working are fortunate in this economy. We could easily be in a desperate situation. Great series - hopefully, some people can be influenced. Larry Levine Philadelphia Education is critical to ending poverty, and the most important place it starts is in the home.
NEWS
September 12, 2011
Researchers have shown previously that maternal stress during pregnancy may have negative consequences for the fetus, both in humans and laboratory animals. A new study from the University of Pennsylvania suggests that in mice, such impacts - namely, an increased sensitivity to stress - are passed along even to the fetus' children. The finding, published in the Journal of Neuroscience, is an example of epigenetics: the study of how genes can be switched on or off in ways that may be inherited by future generations.
NEWS
April 27, 2011 | By Mark Kennedy, Associated Press
Phoebe Snow, 60, a bluesy singer, guitarist, and songwriter who had a defining hit of the 1970s with "Poetry Man" but then largely dropped out of the spotlight to care for her disabled daughter, has died. Ms. Snow, nominated for best new artist at the 1975 Grammys, died Tuesday morning in Edison, N.J., from complications of a brain hemorrhage she suffered in January 2010, said Rick Miramontez, her longtime friend and public relations representative. Known as a folk guitarist who made forays into jazz and blues, Ms. Snow put her stamp on soul classics such as "Shakey Ground," "Love Makes a Woman," and "Mercy, Mercy, Mercy" in a recording career of more than a half-dozen albums.
NEWS
January 23, 1997 | By Mary Blakinger, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Matt Carey just started his second year of foreign-language classes. But he won't be taking college placement exams any time soon. Matt is only 2 1/2. He and sister Maggie, 4, join other preschoolers each week in singing, counting and playing games in French and Spanish. Called Kinderlingua, the program was devised and is taught by Susan C. de Botton of Merion and Dominique de Botton-Reiff of Gladwyne, friends who are distantly related. Classes are in rented quarters at Gladwyne United Methodist Church.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 21, 2014
RE: "TAPPED OUT" series: I know about poverty. I was a caseworker for a few years in the 1970s. No one gets rich off welfare. Reagan spun this myth in the 1960s to get ignorant people comfortable with their prejudices and bigotry, and it still works. Those of us who are working are fortunate in this economy. We could easily be in a desperate situation. Great series - hopefully, some people can be influenced. Larry Levine Philadelphia Education is critical to ending poverty, and the most important place it starts is in the home.
NEWS
December 12, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The scenes are too common for comfort: A mother grabs her daughter's arm roughly on the bus. A father at a Wawa growls coarsely into his son's ear. Not legally defined as child abuse, it's known as harsh or authoritarian parenting. Regardless of race or income level, mothers and fathers everywhere are capable of it. But low-income parents who struggle with stresses from overwhelming issues such as hunger, or lack of a job or adequate housing, seem to engage in harsh parenting more often, researchers have concluded.
NEWS
March 20, 2013 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jenny Roca sat with her legs dangling off the stage as she urged 300 educators to close their eyes, clear their minds, and pay attention to their bodies. In the span of minutes, the teacher from Arise Academy Charter High School in Philadelphia hoped, those attending a summit Monday on the impact of poverty and violence on children's ability to learn would better understand how the body is stimulated and reacts. Children can learn to recognize physiological changes to fear, anger, or other emotions, Roca said.
NEWS
July 3, 2012 | By Dana DiFilippo and Daily News Staff Writer
TYRONE JONES was 16 when, police say, he shot another boy in a gang-related execution in North Philadelphia. Jones is now 56 and one of the longest-serving of Pennsylvania's juvenile lifers, having spent his entire adult life behind bars. On Monday, he became among the first in the state to seek a new sentence under last week's landmark Supreme Court decision declaring mandatory life-in-prison sentences unconstitutional for juveniles. "What [the high court's ruling]
NEWS
February 20, 2012
The behavioral symptoms that define disorders on the autism spectrum sometimes start to emerge as early as 12 months of age. But often, a firm diagnosis is not made until a child is 2 or older. What if you could predict autism when a child was just 6 months old? New research using sophisticated brain scans suggests this may one day be possible, enabling high-risk infants to be targeted for early intervention and treatment. The research, conducted by scientists at seven institutions, including Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, was published online last week in the American Journal of Psychiatry.
NEWS
January 8, 2012
Free Will and the Science of the Brain By Michael S. Gazzaniga Ecco. 272 pp. $27.99 Reviewed by John Rooney Are we free to choose as we will, or are we biological machines whose actions are determined by the same physical laws that apply to the rest of the universe? Michael S. Gazzaniga, a psychologist at the University of California, Santa Barbara and a leading authority in cognitive neuroscience, starts his book with that puzzle, which has intrigued philosophers and scientists over the ages.
NEWS
September 12, 2011
Researchers have shown previously that maternal stress during pregnancy may have negative consequences for the fetus, both in humans and laboratory animals. A new study from the University of Pennsylvania suggests that in mice, such impacts - namely, an increased sensitivity to stress - are passed along even to the fetus' children. The finding, published in the Journal of Neuroscience, is an example of epigenetics: the study of how genes can be switched on or off in ways that may be inherited by future generations.
NEWS
May 20, 2011 | By Faye Flam, Inquirer Staff Writer
It may not have been survival of the smartest but of the keenest sniffers that pushed the brains of early mammals to grow far bigger and more complex than those of their reptilian ancestors. A group of paleontologists announced Friday that they had used CT scanning to analyze the skulls of ancient creatures on the evolutionary path to becoming mammals, and found most of the brain growth occurred in the smell center - the olfactory bulb. "We associate the brain's primary function with thinking," said Zhe-Xi Luo, a paleontologist at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History in Pittsburgh, who was part of the team.
NEWS
April 27, 2011 | Associated Press
NEW YORK - It wasn't long after the release of "Poetry Man," the breezy, jazzy love song that would make Phoebe Snow a star, that the singer experienced another event that would dramatically alter her life. In 1975, she gave birth to a daughter, Valerie Rose, who was found to be severely brain-damaged. Her husband split from her soon after the baby was born. And, at a time when many disabled children were sent to institutions, Snow decided to keep her daughter at home and care for the child herself.
NEWS
April 27, 2011 | By Mark Kennedy, Associated Press
Phoebe Snow, 60, a bluesy singer, guitarist, and songwriter who had a defining hit of the 1970s with "Poetry Man" but then largely dropped out of the spotlight to care for her disabled daughter, has died. Ms. Snow, nominated for best new artist at the 1975 Grammys, died Tuesday morning in Edison, N.J., from complications of a brain hemorrhage she suffered in January 2010, said Rick Miramontez, her longtime friend and public relations representative. Known as a folk guitarist who made forays into jazz and blues, Ms. Snow put her stamp on soul classics such as "Shakey Ground," "Love Makes a Woman," and "Mercy, Mercy, Mercy" in a recording career of more than a half-dozen albums.
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