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Brain Disorders

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BUSINESS
January 6, 1988 | By Ron Wolf, Inquirer Staff Writer
Frank Baldino gave up a top-level research job at Du Pont Co. three months ago. Now, working from a borrowed office in Malvern, he is assembling a team of scientists that will seek new treatments for some of humanity's most debilitating diseases. "This is a big game we're playing," said Baldino, president and scientific director of Cephalon Inc. A group of venture capitalists lured Baldino, a neuroscientist, from Du Pont to head Cephalon, a new biotechnology firm. Cephalon's financial backers want Baldino to apply recent breakthroughs in biotechnology to Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and other degenerative brain disorders.
NEWS
July 2, 1998 | By Shankar Vedantam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For the first time ever, doctors have implanted artificial brain cells into a human, a 62-year-old stroke patient in Pittsburgh, opening the possibility of eventually treating people with brain disorders ranging from Parkinson's disease to Alzheimer's. The experimental procedure was fueled by research at the University of Pennsylvania, where neuroscientists John Trojanowski and Virginia Lee figured out a way to take certain cancer cells and turn them into brain cells. Scientists don't know yet whether transplanting brain cells - neurons - can reverse damage caused by stroke or any other brain disease.
NEWS
July 27, 2006
THE CONCEPT of lying is even more pervasive than illustrated in the July 5 op-ed by Jim Castagnera. Apart from the examples of "Scooter" Libby and President Clinton, we know that politicians in general lie when they consistently promise what they can't deliver. Men consistently lie to seduce women. Advertisers lie when they bury significant information about their products in the fine print. From the medical viewpoint, people may lie because they just can't help it. Like compulsive gambling, there is a medical disorder called pathological lying.
LIVING
March 31, 1997 | By Shankar Vedantam, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Scientists are increasingly finding that mental disorders may only be malfunctions of the physical brain, much like a broken ankle, and, perhaps, equally curable. The brain is highly specialized, and mental maladies are rooted in specific areas of the brain. Anxiety disorders may affect areas of the brain that govern emotion; schizophrenia, areas that govern hearing and sight. "By knowing where in the brain things may go wrong in mental disorders, we can target rationally designed treatments," said Steven Hyman, director of the National Institute of Mental Health.
NEWS
September 13, 1990 | By Marc Shogol Compiled from reports from Inquirer wire services
THIS SLUG'S FOR YOU You may already know that slugs have a fatal attraction for beer - and that you can rid your garden of them by setting out a container of beer, into which they will crawl and die. But what brand of beer do they like best? In a Colorado State University researcher's taste test, Budweiser was the slugs' choice, by a 5-1 ratio, the Wall Street Journal reports. However, don't expect Anheuser-Busch to replace Spuds Mackenzie with Slugs Mackenzie. CRACK-BRAINED If you needed it, here's another reason not to smoke crack: Its use appears to be causing a rash of strokes among young adults, says a report in the New England Journal of Medicine, which describes 28 people who suffered strokes within 72 hours of smoking crack.
NEWS
June 15, 1993 | by Kitty Caparella, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writer Cynthia Burton contributed to this report
The neurosurgeon who led the six-person team that removed a two-inch benign brain tumor from U.S. Sen. Arlen Specter yesterday was Dr. Eugene S. Flamm, known as "the best of the best. " Flamm, 56, the Charles Harrison Frazier Professor of Neurosurgery and chair of the neurosurgery department at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania since 1988, has performed thousands of brain operations during his 31-year career. Specter was "in very good hands," said Dr. Michael Sisti, assistant professor of neurosurgery at Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center, who knew Flamm when he worked in New York.
NEWS
June 4, 2001 | By Dennie G. Baker
The Bucks County Mental Health system is in crisis. One major cause is the inability of mental health service providers to recruit and retain trained staff because of unrealistically low salaries. Without enough staff, the safety net for people with mental illnesses will unravel. Low salaries affect everyone in the system, from residential staff to psychiatrists. The range of services affected spans the entire system: residential housing, walk-in and mobile crisis services, adult and children's outpatient care, adult partial hospitalization, substance-abuse specialists, case management, children's wraparound treatment (in home and school)
NEWS
February 15, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Raymond P. Hill Jr., 27, of Havertown, a former research assistant at the University of Pennsylvania, died Wednesday, Jan. 9, in San Francisco of an overdose of prescribed medication. A lively man who showed great promise, Mr. Hill had struggled with depression and addiction for several years, his family said. On Dec. 31, he went to California on a spiritual journey to clear his head, he told his family in an e-mail. He planned to enter a Caron Foundation drug-rehab center in January, said his mother, Cass.
NEWS
June 24, 1992 | By Carolyn Acker, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You are relaxing to the hypnotic sounds of the ocean, when suddenly you hear a car crash followed by screams. Your muscles tense, pulse quickens and pupils dilate. Your breathing becomes rapid and shallow. The limbic system of your brain is now in command. A primitive part of the brain, the limbic system triggers the body's "fight or flight" response - physiological changes that prepare the body to face danger. But the danger this time is brought to you by tape-recorded sounds - just one way that an ambitious million-dollar exhibit at the Franklin Institute helps you to get inside your head.
NEWS
February 7, 1996 | by Don Russell, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writer Bob Warner contributed to this report
John E. du Pont, the oddball millionaire with a fondness for poking and squeezing on the wrestling mat, will get a taste of his own medicine today. He'll be examined and probed by a team of University of Pennsylvania physicians, conducting a battery of court-ordered neurological tests. The alleged killer's lawyers want to determine whether he has any brain disorders that might be the cause of his widely reported bizarre behavior. The tests, along with psychological examinations, could provide du Pont's attorneys with the basis for an insanity defense, psychiatric experts say. Du Pont faces first-degree murder charges in the Jan. 26 slaying of Olympic wrestler Dave Schultz at du Pont's 800-acre Foxcatcher Farm.
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NEWS
February 15, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Raymond P. Hill Jr., 27, of Havertown, a former research assistant at the University of Pennsylvania, died Wednesday, Jan. 9, in San Francisco of an overdose of prescribed medication. A lively man who showed great promise, Mr. Hill had struggled with depression and addiction for several years, his family said. On Dec. 31, he went to California on a spiritual journey to clear his head, he told his family in an e-mail. He planned to enter a Caron Foundation drug-rehab center in January, said his mother, Cass.
SPORTS
November 17, 2009
I AM NOT a neurologist, nor do I play one in print or on television. But if "the No. 1 thing is Brian's health," as Andy Reid said yesterday, then there really is only one thing for Brian Westbrook to do: Retire. Immediately. "Obviously we're going to check with experts and make sure that we listen to them like we did before," Reid said at his Monday press conference. Note to staff: Find some other experts. If the No. 1 thing really is Brian's health. Find ones with no links to the NFL, to the Eagles.
SPORTS
June 19, 2007 | By PAUL DOMOWITCH, pdomo@aol.com
CHICAGO - As the overseer of America's most violent sport, it disturbs NFL commissioner Roger Goodell that many people think his league has turned a blind eye to the issue of concussions. "The thing that troubles me most is people think we've had our head in the sand [about concussions] and we haven't," Goodell told the Daily News late last week. "We've been studying this issue for 13 years. I think we've been very responsible. "On the other hand, we don't have all the answers.
BUSINESS
November 12, 2006 | By Jane M. Von Bergen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The only thing good that career salesman Alan Currie could say about himself on the day he accepted a high-stakes sales job five years ago was that at least he managed to sell himself into a job. He didn't deserve it, he told himself. "I'm a complete fraud. " Currie's self-denigrating song is typical of adults with ADHD, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. They replay it as they count their offenses - office disaster zones of haphazard piles, misplaced documents, and lost phone numbers, or the wrong thing said at the wrong time.
NEWS
July 27, 2006
THE CONCEPT of lying is even more pervasive than illustrated in the July 5 op-ed by Jim Castagnera. Apart from the examples of "Scooter" Libby and President Clinton, we know that politicians in general lie when they consistently promise what they can't deliver. Men consistently lie to seduce women. Advertisers lie when they bury significant information about their products in the fine print. From the medical viewpoint, people may lie because they just can't help it. Like compulsive gambling, there is a medical disorder called pathological lying.
NEWS
June 16, 2001 | By Ralph Vigoda INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Massachusetts truck driver who caused a fiery, 13-vehicle crash in September on the Schuylkill Expressway that killed three young people will not be charged with a crime, Montgomery County District Attorney Bruce L. Castor Jr. said yesterday. Castor said an investigation had shown that Walter Seifert, 64, was unaware that he had a brain disorder that clouded his judgment at the time of the accident. He did not identify the type of disorder. "The MRI revealed brain damage in his recent past that resulted from a lack of oxygen," Castor said.
NEWS
June 4, 2001 | By Dennie G. Baker
The Bucks County Mental Health system is in crisis. One major cause is the inability of mental health service providers to recruit and retain trained staff because of unrealistically low salaries. Without enough staff, the safety net for people with mental illnesses will unravel. Low salaries affect everyone in the system, from residential staff to psychiatrists. The range of services affected spans the entire system: residential housing, walk-in and mobile crisis services, adult and children's outpatient care, adult partial hospitalization, substance-abuse specialists, case management, children's wraparound treatment (in home and school)
NEWS
July 2, 1998 | By Shankar Vedantam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For the first time ever, doctors have implanted artificial brain cells into a human, a 62-year-old stroke patient in Pittsburgh, opening the possibility of eventually treating people with brain disorders ranging from Parkinson's disease to Alzheimer's. The experimental procedure was fueled by research at the University of Pennsylvania, where neuroscientists John Trojanowski and Virginia Lee figured out a way to take certain cancer cells and turn them into brain cells. Scientists don't know yet whether transplanting brain cells - neurons - can reverse damage caused by stroke or any other brain disease.
LIVING
June 22, 1998 | By Shankar Vedantam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was a moment during World War II in Europe that the American soldier would remember the rest of his life: There was an explosion and flying shrapnel. A shard whipped past his face, cutting his forehead. And it killed the soldier standing next to him, his best friend. Decades later, the soldier, Edward, would wake at night in a panic and a shiver, and be transported from his Philadelphia-area home back to that awful battlefield. So when he was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, his wife, Dorothy, was never quite sure whether the doctors were right.
LIVING
March 31, 1997 | By Shankar Vedantam, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Scientists are increasingly finding that mental disorders may only be malfunctions of the physical brain, much like a broken ankle, and, perhaps, equally curable. The brain is highly specialized, and mental maladies are rooted in specific areas of the brain. Anxiety disorders may affect areas of the brain that govern emotion; schizophrenia, areas that govern hearing and sight. "By knowing where in the brain things may go wrong in mental disorders, we can target rationally designed treatments," said Steven Hyman, director of the National Institute of Mental Health.
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