CollectionsBrain Drain
IN THE NEWS

Brain Drain

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
November 6, 2000 | by Michael Hinkelman, Daily News Staff Writer
John P. Tedesco, Jr. knows that at a startup company, success depends upon the CEO's ability to marshal resources - and a lot of those resources are available only if you're in the right location. But when it came time for the 29-year-old entrepreneur to hatch his venture - an online bill-management company called PayMyBills.com - Philly didn't have the right stuff. Tedesco, a finalist in the 1999 Wharton School Business Plan competition at the University of Pennsylvania, wanted to get to market quickly.
NEWS
January 29, 1992 | BY JACK MCKINNEY
It seems a lot of noses are out of joint over the prospect of a "brain drain" of Soviet nuclear scientists. The way the scare goes, now that the Soviet Union is no more, what's to prevent its former nuke experts from peddling their lethal know-how to such third-world despots as Libya's Moammar Gadhafi, Syria's Hafez Assad and even to Iraq's amazingly resilient Saddam Hussein? As Yogi Berra said, "It's deja vu all over again. " Does "Operation Paper Clip" ring a bell with any readers out there?
NEWS
September 17, 1991 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Where have all the Pennsylvanians gone? To Florida. And Maryland, Virginia, California and Texas. Anywhere, it seems, where the jobs are more plentiful and the sun shines more warmly. The state lost about 300,000 residents to out-migration in the last decade, census figures show, as more people moved out than moved in, continuing almost half a century of flight from Pennsylvania. And a state legislative subcommittee meeting here yesterday in one of the hardest-hit areas, Schuylkill County, said the people who were leaving were the state's youngest, brightest and richest.
NEWS
December 10, 2000 | By Jennifer Moroz, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Having watched New Jersey companies clamber for workers trained in science and technology as thousands of potential candidates flee the state every year, legislators are proposing giving the state's best and brightest more incentive to stay home. A bipartisan bill, proposed last month by state Assembly leaders, would establish the Garden State New Millennium Scholarship Program, offering academic scholarships of up to $10,000 a year to state residents majoring in science and technology at colleges in the state.
NEWS
October 20, 2002 | By Thomas Fitzgerald INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
Pennsylvania recently ran TV ads featuring the "fairy job mother" - a pudgy, winged guy in a pink tutu and construction boots who stops a computer hot shot from moving west by extolling the state's quality of life. Airing on the cable channels MTV, Comedy Central and ESPN2, the campaign was designed to grab the attention of the jaded digital generation. It was part of the Schweiker administration's $12 million effort to persuade some of the 5,000 recent college graduates who leave Pennsylvania each year to settle here.
NEWS
January 25, 1987 | By Robert Glass, Associated Press
Frustrated by a chronic shortage of research money, hundreds of British scientists are leaving the country each year to work in the United States. Critics call it an alarming new "brain drain. " Not just recent graduates, but many renowned researchers have joined the exodus, compounding concern over Britain's ability to retain its historic place at the leading edge of science. According to the U.S. National Science Foundation, about 1,000 British scientists settle in the United States annually - as many as from all other Western European countries combined.
NEWS
May 20, 2002
Concern is growing about Pennsylvania's brain drain. Many of our brightest young residents and college graduates leave the state. Give us the best sales pitch you could make to a bright 25-year-old graduate of a Pennsylvania campus to persuade him or her to stay in Pennsylvania. Bob Casey Jr. Help us write the next exciting chapter in the history of this great commonwealth. My vision for Pennsylvania includes a strong system of public education, high-paying jobs, quality and affordable health care, and a clean and safe environment.
NEWS
December 26, 2000 | Daily News Staff Report
Need a new job, now that the Christmas bills are coming in? The Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce will host its annual SCT Operation Native Talent job fair tomorrow and Thursday at the Pennsylvania Convention Center from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Admission is free. The chamber says its job fair - the largest in the region and in its 35th year - is an effort to stop the "brain drain" that sucks talent out of the region. It offers not only over 150 recruiters but also information for job seekers, including the opportunity to meet one-on-one with career counselors.
BUSINESS
March 11, 1999 | By Leslie J. Nicholson, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Unisys Corp. wants to help plug the brain drain. The Blue Bell company said yesterday it will offer an unspecified number of internships as part of Gov. Ridge's proposed SciTech Scholars program. The program's aim is to keep college graduates with high-technology skills from leaving Pennsylvania. SciTech - part of Ridge's proposed 1999-2000 budget - would give scholarships of up to $3,000 a year for three years to science and technology students at Pennsylvania colleges and universities.
NEWS
March 8, 2001 | by Earni Young Daily News Staff Writer
For the first time, the presidents of as many as 18 Philadelphia-area colleges and universities are meeting as a group, talking over issues of common interest such as economic growth in the region. The group - which has met twice so far - includes the presidents of the University of Pennsylvania, Moore College of Art and Design, Bryn Mawr College, and the Community College of Philadelphia, as well as Temple, La Salle, St. Joseph's and Lincoln universities. Many others have attended one of the two meetings; as many as 25 have been invited.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 25, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Gov. Christie vowed to rein in government spending when he took office in 2010, and one of his most controversial first-term initiatives was setting a cap on salaries for school district superintendents. Anecdotes of seemingly exorbitant pay for school administrators became a symbol of the government excess Christie had pledged to rid from Trenton. Four years after Christie set his own salary - $175,000 - as a maximum base for superintendents, Democratic lawmakers and school boards say the regulation has resulted in high turnover and made the state less competitive in attracting the best administrators.
NEWS
February 19, 2014 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rutgers University will try to entice New Jersey's best and brightest to stay in-state with a new undergraduate merit scholarship that president Robert L. Barchi announced Monday. The Henry Rutgers Merit Scholarship will be awarded to 100 undergraduates a year for each of the next four years in an attempt to reduce the flow of more than 30,000 students who leave the Garden State annually for college elsewhere. The scholarships will be available to freshmen entering in the fall of 2014.
NEWS
March 5, 2013
S TEPHEN GILL AND Zachary Robbins, both 26 and of Center City, cofounded Leadnomics in 2007 while classmates at Rowan University in Glassboro, N.J. The company, now based in the Cira Centre next to 30th Street Station, generates leads for banks and insurance companies with online advertising campaigns. The fast-growing company employs 35. I spoke with Gill. Q: How's the business model work? A: We own a portal, a micro-content website for auto insurance. Cheapquotesdirect.com is one such site.
FOOD
August 16, 2012 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Columnist
The morning of March 27, 2011, smoke and flames drove brothers Andrew and David Wallace and Andrew's girlfriend from their apartments above the family-owned Churchville Inn , a landmark in Southampton, Bucks County. "There were three walls left standing," said their father, Jeff, last week, as the landmark reopened (1500 Bustleton Pike, Southampton, 215-357-3967). The main dining room is spruced up with a mural, crafted from barn wood by Murrie Gayman, that depicts historic events and people from Bucks County history.
NEWS
July 13, 2012 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Colin Kerr is what you'd call a creature of the city. He grew up in Powelton Village, went to Masterman, then Drexel, which he walked to from his parents' rowhouse. He was so good at computer programming that by the time he graduated in 2007, dream jobs awaited. He picked Bentley Systems, a family-owned software company in Exton, and this presented a problem for a guy who's never owned a car. Kerr figured out that, by taking his customized 27-speed bicycle on Regional Rail, he could make it to the office in two hours if he left his house at 5:30 a.m. He knew the commute was getting to him when he began sleeping under his desk on those nights when he worked so late that the trains ran infrequently.
NEWS
October 17, 2011 | By Quan Nguyen, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Erica Hawthorne, a spoken-word artist, has thrived in Philadelphia. "I've grown creatively here," said Hawthorne (a.k.a. "RhapsoE"), a city resident of nine years and a member of the Spoken Soul 215 Collective. "I released my first CD here, built a creative support system, and supported other meaningful creative and socially conscious endeavors. " But retaining such talent has been a challenge that Claire Robertson-Kraft, board chair of Young Involved Philadelphia (YIP)
NEWS
September 19, 2011
EVERYBODY remembers where they were on 9/11, but it was the day after that I remember most. I worked the night shift on 9/11 after watching TV all day. On 9/12, there was no noise, nobody running for the bus, no children going to school, no airplane noise. People were walking around in a daze, some crying. It reminded me of the day JFK was killed when I was a kid. My father used to tell me about Pearl Harbor, and what Americans felt. I understand now, because on 9/12, I felt the same way. I wanted to go to war and make the people who did this pay. We all felt so helpless.
NEWS
June 2, 2010
By Claire Robertson-Kraft and Matt Goldfine Philadelphia is the city that goes to sleep early, as young people from other big cities can tell you. And if City Council goes ahead with a nightlife crackdown now under consideration, we'll be going to bed even earlier, making the city less attractive to young people. Many of us remember the brain drain. Several years ago, studies showed that Philadelphia's universities brought in almost 50,000 freshmen a year, but retained less than half that population after graduation.
NEWS
July 29, 2008 | By Jeff Hurvitz
While driving a taxi during my college years in the early 1970s, I would regularly take a temperature on new arrivals to our area. Invariably, upon driving from the airport, passengers would ask me to identify the letters PSFS and PNB that adorned the skyline. Upon being told that they were monikers for banking institutions, a tacit sign of approval was then met by: "Where's the best place to eat here?" and "How are those Phillies doing?" There were no major markers identifying our great institutions of higher education, our wonderful teaching hospitals or most of our major industries.
NEWS
December 7, 2006 | By Will Hobson FOR THE INQUIRER
Chester County, like much of Pennsylvania, suffers from what has been termed the "brain drain. " The county's brightest minds, students who travel to colleges across the country to earn their degrees, all too often don't find the Pennsylvania job market plentiful enough. College internships in the cities where they go to school often lead to job opportunities there, and Chester County misses out on the contributions of its homegrown talent: people who instead find success in New York, Boston or Washington.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|