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Brain Injury

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NEWS
May 27, 2010 | By Laura S. Lorenz
The wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have drawn more attention to the plight of brain-injury survivors, as has the NFL's recent acknowledgment that some of its players are suffering neurological consequences from repeated concussions. But our health policies and treatment practices have yet to catch up to the staggering toll of this complex and insidious condition. Five million Americans are living with disabilities from brain injuries. There are 80,000 to 90,000 new long-term disabilities from brain injuries each year, and a new traumatic brain injury is sustained every 23 seconds.
NEWS
February 10, 2002 | By Rosalee Rhodes FOR THE INQUIRER
The Bancroft NeuroHealth Institute for Professional Development and Research will hold "The ABCs of ABI," a conference on acquired brain injury, from 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. April 26 at the Cherry Hill Hilton on Route 70. The conference is designed to provide those who work with children with brain injuries knowledge about acquired brain injury assessment and how to handle behavioral, cognitive and clinical needs. Training sessions will be held on a variety of topics on pediatric brain injuries, including the mechanics of brain injury, characteristics that affect learning and behavior, and key teaching strategies.
NEWS
June 5, 1986 | By Jim Haner, Special to The Inquirer
Calling the Bryn Mawr Rehabilitation Hospital in Malvern "one of the best I've seen in the world," Michael Bond, a pioneer in the field of rehabilitative medicine, toured the hospital's new $13.7 million brain-injury unit Tuesday. "It's the only facility I've ever visited in the U.S. or abroad where the people responsible for treating the severely disabled also had a hand in designing the hospital," he said. "To my mind, that's the way it should be, but it really is quite unusual.
NEWS
June 26, 1994 | By Karla Haworth, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
From the outside, it looks like any other suburban home. A white minivan is parked in the driveway of the spacious four-bedroom rancher in the Richwood section of town, and the house is surrounded by peach orchards, a covered patio and an above-ground pool - and sometimes by the footprints left in the grass by resident Joyce Toy as she paces outside, chatting to family members on a cordless phone. Inside, Toy bustles by the list of chores taped to the kitchen wall, bantering with her three housemates as they eat breakfast and crowd the kitchen counter to make their lunches before heading off to vocational training for the day. It is not the home's appearance but Toy and her housemates who make the house unique.
NEWS
April 2, 2001 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Research by University of Pennsylvania scientists is shedding some light on why brain damage progresses long after a traumatic injury. The work also suggests possible treatments. Scientists have previously shown that head trauma damages nerve fibers - axons - that connect nerve cells in the brain. These fibers are meant to stretch during normal activity, but a fast blow to the brain can snap or stretch them too far, said Douglas Smith, an associate professor in Penn's department of neurosurgery.
NEWS
July 25, 2011
Researchers have suspected for a while that people who sustain a single traumatic brain injury are more likely to develop Alzheimer's-like symptoms later in life. Now a University of Pennsylvania scientist has helped bolster that theory with some hard evidence: irregular protein deposits in samples of human brain. The brains came from 39 people who had had a moderate or severe traumatic brain injury at some point but died from another cause, anywhere from one to 47 years later.
NEWS
October 4, 2000 | by April Adamson, Daily News Staff Writer
Cathy Crimmins misses her husband. He didn't die, but the man she married continues on a long road to recovery from a traumatic brain injury. She calls it an "incomplete death. " "You've lost a person, or parts of that person, but he's still there," Crimmins says. Crimmins was on an idyllic lakeside vacation in Canada in July 1996 when a speedboat navigated by a teen-ager struck her husband and injured his head, damaging the frontal lobes that control speech, movement and personality, and sparking a four-year journey from hospital to rehabilitation center.
NEWS
March 13, 2016 | By Stacey Burling, Staff Writer
Like so many who had come to the recent Mind Your Brain conference at Penn Medicine, Janine Kirby wanted to talk about hope. Hers was hard-earned. After a series of concussions from soccer, "life stuff," and boxing, the blow that turned her into a brain injury survivor came at work on 12/12/12, a rare string of numbers that she can remember. A steel beam crashed into her head. From there, she rode a helicopter to Penn. Eighteen months into her recovery, she started having seizures so severe that doctors had to remove her entire right temporal lobe because it was crippled by scar tissue.
NEWS
June 13, 2012 | By John F. Morrison and Daily News Staff Writer
No degree of adversity could stop Thelma Renee Stevens from living life to the fullest.   Thelma suffered from a brain injury that caused seizures throughout her life, but her spirit never wavered. "She was a fighter," said an aunt, Patricia Fletcher. "She never gave up. " Thelma Stevens, who worked as a teacher's aide at a day-care center and as a housekeeper, died after a seizure on May 31. She was 25 and lived in West Philadelphia. Despite her physical problems, Thelma's death was unexpected and shocked the family.
NEWS
December 19, 1986 | By EDWARD MORAN, Daily News Staff Writer
Thomas Loyden, a Northeast Philadelphia man who suffered brain damage when he was hit on the head with a police nightstick while being arrested April 2, was found not guilty yesterday of charges that he assaulted a police officer and resisted arrest. "I heard him right, didn't I?" asked a tearful Mary Loyden, Loyden's mother, after Municipal Judge Michael Conroy pronounced Loyden "not quilty of all charges. " "There is some justice after all," Mary Loyden said. "The wrong people were on trial today," she said.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 28, 2016 | By Caitlin McCabe, Staff Writer
By sheer logistics, Ruth Donnelly and Dorothy Johnson-Speight might have never met. In 2001, Johnson-Speight was 52, living in the Mount Airy section of Philadelphia, working as a mental health therapist. Donnelly was 43, living in Olney, and working in education. Five miles separated them. They lived in different worlds. But profound tragedy - and coincidence - linked the two: Both lost their sons to murder. Both sons were killed by the same man, just five months - and two blocks - apart.
NEWS
July 3, 2016 | Susan A. Masino, FOR THE INQUIRER
Susan A. Masino, the Vernon Roosa Professor of Applied Science at Trinity College, studies links among metabolism, brain activity, and behavior. Brain disorders are expensive, and their costs to families and society can never be calculated fully. As a neuroscientist, I know that despite heroic research efforts our current medical treatments rarely cure neurological problems - and often can't treat them effectively. Devastating and complex problems with our fragile and amazing nervous system span all ages.
NEWS
June 20, 2016 | By Stephanie Farr, Staff Writer
THE CAVANAUGHS have raised their son twice. They taught him to speak, twice. They taught him to walk, twice. Jack Sr. even taught Jack Jr. to ride a bicycle, twice. Jack Cavanaugh Jr. was 21 in August 2013 when he fell 12 feet from an indoor balcony at his parents' cabin in the Poconos. The fall caused a traumatic brain injury that left him comatose for a month. When he awoke, he couldn't walk, communicate, or swallow. His body was a strange machine he couldn't control. Cavanaugh had played soccer and run track at Cardinal O'Hara High School in Springfield, Delaware County.
NEWS
May 9, 2016 | By Kellie Patrick Gates, Staff Writer
Hello there On a warm November Sunday in 2009, some friends decided the weather was just right for softball. At that game, played on the field of their former high school, Heidi first noticed Jack, and Jack first noticed Heidi. She was Hatboro-Horsham Class of 2003, he was Class of 2004. Though their social circles overlapped a little, they never really spoke back then. They didn't speak on the ball field, either. A week or two later, Jack and friends walked into the Brick House Tavern.
SPORTS
April 25, 2016 | By Aaron Carter, Staff Writer
Few feats for a lacrosse goalie are more difficult than saving a shot that can't be seen. Just ask Hailey Andress. The junior goaltender for Agnes Irwin missed 10 weeks this season after suffering a dangerous brain injury during a February practice. At the Katie Samson Laxfest on Saturday, however, Andress, who has battled vision, balance, and spatial-awareness problems, stopped a career-high 16 shots in the Owls' 14-8 victory over Great Valley at Radnor High. "This was great," Andress said.
SPORTS
April 4, 2016 | By Phil Anastasia, Staff Writer
Someday, Mike Shinske might take up golf. Someday, he might buy himself a set of clubs and settle into a weekend routine of a relaxing 18. Someday, he might look back and laugh at his reaction at this time last year when a well-meaning doctor suggested he might want to take up the sport. "Golf?" Shinske remembers saying in the hospital room. "I hate golf. " In time, Shinske might grow to appreciate the challenge of chasing that little white ball around the course. For now, he'll stick with lacrosse.
NEWS
March 26, 2016 | By Natalie Pompilio, For The Inquirer
At a coffee shop, Brian Mottolo will allow other customers to go ahead of him. He'll wait in the back, practicing his order in his head. When it's all clear, he'll approach the counter and say, "Medium dark roast. Cream and sugar. " When Mottolo, 52, shared that story during a meeting at Magee Rehab recently, his audience lauded him. "You've been practicing!" speech language pathologist Sarah Lantz said. "That's good. That's real good. " Mottolo has aphasia, the loss of the ability to use language because of damage to the brain.
NEWS
March 13, 2016 | By Stacey Burling, Staff Writer
Like so many who had come to the recent Mind Your Brain conference at Penn Medicine, Janine Kirby wanted to talk about hope. Hers was hard-earned. After a series of concussions from soccer, "life stuff," and boxing, the blow that turned her into a brain injury survivor came at work on 12/12/12, a rare string of numbers that she can remember. A steel beam crashed into her head. From there, she rode a helicopter to Penn. Eighteen months into her recovery, she started having seizures so severe that doctors had to remove her entire right temporal lobe because it was crippled by scar tissue.
NEWS
March 13, 2016
Ex-Chicago Bears quarterback Jim McMahon (who also spent time with the Eagles) calls himself "old school," including his use of marijuana both during and after his career. His self-medicating could be ahead of its time. Johns Hopkins researchers will test whether a compound found in hemp - and its cousin, cannabis - is as good at treating brain injuries as testimonials say. Some ex-players believe cannabidiol, or CBD, could aid millions who suffer brain injuries, including chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative disease caused by repeated concussions and found in many ex-NFL players whose brains were autopsied.
NEWS
February 21, 2016 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
Concern over the Zika virus - by now, the U.S. has had more than 50 cases, all associated with travel - has brought new focus to a birth defect that has been linked to the illness. It is microcephaly, which already affects about five in 1,000 children. David Bearden, a clinical instructor at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, has focused much of his research on congenital infections that can cause microcephaly. Bearden, also medical director of the International Program for Neurology at CHOP, spoke to us recently about the condition.
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