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Brain Injury

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NEWS
May 27, 2010 | By Laura S. Lorenz
The wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have drawn more attention to the plight of brain-injury survivors, as has the NFL's recent acknowledgment that some of its players are suffering neurological consequences from repeated concussions. But our health policies and treatment practices have yet to catch up to the staggering toll of this complex and insidious condition. Five million Americans are living with disabilities from brain injuries. There are 80,000 to 90,000 new long-term disabilities from brain injuries each year, and a new traumatic brain injury is sustained every 23 seconds.
NEWS
February 10, 2002 | By Rosalee Rhodes FOR THE INQUIRER
The Bancroft NeuroHealth Institute for Professional Development and Research will hold "The ABCs of ABI," a conference on acquired brain injury, from 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. April 26 at the Cherry Hill Hilton on Route 70. The conference is designed to provide those who work with children with brain injuries knowledge about acquired brain injury assessment and how to handle behavioral, cognitive and clinical needs. Training sessions will be held on a variety of topics on pediatric brain injuries, including the mechanics of brain injury, characteristics that affect learning and behavior, and key teaching strategies.
NEWS
June 5, 1986 | By Jim Haner, Special to The Inquirer
Calling the Bryn Mawr Rehabilitation Hospital in Malvern "one of the best I've seen in the world," Michael Bond, a pioneer in the field of rehabilitative medicine, toured the hospital's new $13.7 million brain-injury unit Tuesday. "It's the only facility I've ever visited in the U.S. or abroad where the people responsible for treating the severely disabled also had a hand in designing the hospital," he said. "To my mind, that's the way it should be, but it really is quite unusual.
NEWS
June 26, 1994 | By Karla Haworth, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
From the outside, it looks like any other suburban home. A white minivan is parked in the driveway of the spacious four-bedroom rancher in the Richwood section of town, and the house is surrounded by peach orchards, a covered patio and an above-ground pool - and sometimes by the footprints left in the grass by resident Joyce Toy as she paces outside, chatting to family members on a cordless phone. Inside, Toy bustles by the list of chores taped to the kitchen wall, bantering with her three housemates as they eat breakfast and crowd the kitchen counter to make their lunches before heading off to vocational training for the day. It is not the home's appearance but Toy and her housemates who make the house unique.
NEWS
April 2, 2001 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Research by University of Pennsylvania scientists is shedding some light on why brain damage progresses long after a traumatic injury. The work also suggests possible treatments. Scientists have previously shown that head trauma damages nerve fibers - axons - that connect nerve cells in the brain. These fibers are meant to stretch during normal activity, but a fast blow to the brain can snap or stretch them too far, said Douglas Smith, an associate professor in Penn's department of neurosurgery.
NEWS
July 25, 2011
Researchers have suspected for a while that people who sustain a single traumatic brain injury are more likely to develop Alzheimer's-like symptoms later in life. Now a University of Pennsylvania scientist has helped bolster that theory with some hard evidence: irregular protein deposits in samples of human brain. The brains came from 39 people who had had a moderate or severe traumatic brain injury at some point but died from another cause, anywhere from one to 47 years later.
NEWS
October 4, 2000 | by April Adamson, Daily News Staff Writer
Cathy Crimmins misses her husband. He didn't die, but the man she married continues on a long road to recovery from a traumatic brain injury. She calls it an "incomplete death. " "You've lost a person, or parts of that person, but he's still there," Crimmins says. Crimmins was on an idyllic lakeside vacation in Canada in July 1996 when a speedboat navigated by a teen-ager struck her husband and injured his head, damaging the frontal lobes that control speech, movement and personality, and sparking a four-year journey from hospital to rehabilitation center.
NEWS
October 22, 2008
Brian Forsyth is a lifelong Phillies fan who lives in Havertown The Phillies saved my life. Well, technically, a bicycle helmet saved my life. (Wear a helmet, everyone.) But the Phillies have helped heal the traumatic brain injury I suffered in a traffic accident in August 2007. The physical and emotional scars of that accident have required massive amounts of therapy. A lot of it has taken place at Citizens Bank Park. I attended the clinching 2007 season finale in a wheelchair, and I had to leave the game early due to overstimulation.
NEWS
June 13, 2012 | By John F. Morrison and Daily News Staff Writer
No degree of adversity could stop Thelma Renee Stevens from living life to the fullest.   Thelma suffered from a brain injury that caused seizures throughout her life, but her spirit never wavered. "She was a fighter," said an aunt, Patricia Fletcher. "She never gave up. " Thelma Stevens, who worked as a teacher's aide at a day-care center and as a housekeeper, died after a seizure on May 31. She was 25 and lived in West Philadelphia. Despite her physical problems, Thelma's death was unexpected and shocked the family.
NEWS
December 19, 1986 | By EDWARD MORAN, Daily News Staff Writer
Thomas Loyden, a Northeast Philadelphia man who suffered brain damage when he was hit on the head with a police nightstick while being arrested April 2, was found not guilty yesterday of charges that he assaulted a police officer and resisted arrest. "I heard him right, didn't I?" asked a tearful Mary Loyden, Loyden's mother, after Municipal Judge Michael Conroy pronounced Loyden "not quilty of all charges. " "There is some justice after all," Mary Loyden said. "The wrong people were on trial today," she said.
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NEWS
June 26, 2015 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
BOSTON - Johanna Hantel got up Wednesday morning and went for a half-hour run around Boston Commons. It seemed appropriate. The Malvern woman was in Boston to speak for the runners. Hantel was 10 feet from the first bomb, closer than almost any other runner, when it exploded April 15, 2013, killing three and injuring 254. A police officer later died in a shootout with the bombers. One of the proudest days of Hantel's life was the first time she qualified for Boston. Wednesday was even prouder.
NEWS
June 10, 2015 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
JOSHUA GUTIERREZ showed no remorse yesterday as he pleaded guilty to third-degree murder in the death two years ago of his baby daughter and to numerous other crimes. When Common Pleas Judge Lillian Ransom asked if he wanted to say anything, Gutierrez, 24, simply said "no. " Under a negotiated plea deal, Gutierrez was sentenced to 25 to 55 years in state prison. Assistant District Attorney Nicholas Liermann said that on June 21, 2013, Gutierrez, who was "in and out of the picture" when it came to his daughter, Amarianna Gutierrez, then 5 months, 22 days old, offered to babysit her. The child's mother had just gotten a job, but didn't have a babysitter on this day. She lived with her father on Mulberry Street near Foulkrod in Frankford.
NEWS
June 4, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
Delorian Davis was just 18 months old when a carjacked Ford Explorer plowed into a group of people on a North Philadelphia sidewalk, killing her 4-year-old sister, Lucretia, and putting her into a coma. Almost 20 years later, on Jan. 10, 2013, Davis died in the Philadelphia home where her mother and teams of nurses had cared for her, so well that the pathologist who did the autopsy said the young woman's body did not have a single bedsore or scar. Now, the two convicted carjackers, each serving 26- to 52-year sentences for third-degree murder in Lucretia Davis' death, will be tried on charges of third-degree murder in Delorian Davis' case.
NEWS
May 22, 2015 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
THE AMTRAK engineer driving Train 188 when it crashed last week in Frankford, killing eight and injuring more than 200, used his cellphone the day of the deadly derailment, the National Transportation Safety Board announced yesterday. But investigators haven't yet determined whether engineer Brandon Bostian made calls, sent texts and otherwise used his data plan while he was at the train's controls. Bostian, who was injured in the May 12 nighttime disaster, has told investigators he doesn't remember anything in the minutes before or during the crash.
NEWS
January 22, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
Years of "chair shots," "flying head butts," "facebreakers," and "cobra clutch slams" have left former professional wrestlers with long-term brain injuries to which the sport's dominant circuit has continuously turned a blind eye, two ex-wrestlers allege in a proposed class-action suit filed in Philadelphia. The plaintiffs in the suit filed late last week - who include a cross-dressing Italian who wrestled under the name Skull von Krush - say Stamford, Conn.-based World Wrestling Entertainment encouraged them to take risks it knew could permanently affect their well-being while offering them no health or disability insurance.
NEWS
December 17, 2014 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
BLOOMSBURG, Pa. - Calling it "a boorish, brazen, savage intrusion," Columbia County Court Judge Gary E. Norton sentenced Angel Cruz to 22 to 36 months in prison Monday for the Feb. 23 punch that devastated Jackie Lithgow's life. Cruz, 22, was one of four Kutztown University football players who crashed a fraternity party at Bloomsburg University, starting a fight when they refused to leave. When Lithgow, then 18, a Bloomsburg freshman, tried to make peace, Cruz hit Lithgow, who fell back, his head hitting the pavement, and sustained severe brain injury.
NEWS
December 7, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
For decades, researchers have been seeking a blood test that could diagnose a concussion and tell whether it is severe enough to cause lasting brain damage. In a big step toward that holy grail, University of Pennsylvania scientists have found that a blood protein called SNTF surged and stayed elevated in professional hockey players with persistent concussion symptoms, but not in players who recovered within a few days. "These results show that SNTF has promise as a blood biomarker for sports-related concussion," said Robert Siman, a research professor of neurosurgery at Penn and lead author of the study in last month's Journal of Neurotrauma.
NEWS
October 24, 2014 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Is she dead or isn't she? Jahi McMath, 13, was declared brain-dead in December after her heart temporarily stopped during a tonsillectomy in Oakland, Calif. The tragedy drew national attention when the girl's mother, Nailah Winkfield, persuaded a judge in January to allow her to remove the body from the hospital, still on life support. The mother brought the girl to New Jersey, where the law allows a family to refuse to remove life support from brain-dead patients for religious reasons.
NEWS
October 3, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tracy Morgan's future bleak? The brain injury that comic Tracy Morgan , 45, suffered as a result of a June 7 crash with a Walmart tractor-trailer may leave him unable to work. Morgan is in a wheelchair and may not be able to walk for several months, his doctors have said. His lawyer, Benedict Morelli , tells the New York Post that Morgan has been working hard to rehab his body and mind - and has a good deal of work to do on his cognitive and linguistic faculties. Will he ever perform again?
NEWS
September 18, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
"Are you sure you have the right person?" Danielle S. Bassett asked. The University of Pennsylvania brain researcher is just 32, one year into her first faculty position. So when the MacArthur Foundation people called her last week, Bassett figured they were planning to award one of their coveted $625,000 grants to an older colleague, and wanted to ask her opinion. No, they wanted Bassett. The foundation named her and 20 others Wednesday as the winners of its annual fellowships, informally dubbed the "genius grants" by the media in 1981, the first year they were awarded.
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