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Brain Injury

NEWS
March 26, 2016 | By Natalie Pompilio, For The Inquirer
At a coffee shop, Brian Mottolo will allow other customers to go ahead of him. He'll wait in the back, practicing his order in his head. When it's all clear, he'll approach the counter and say, "Medium dark roast. Cream and sugar. " When Mottolo, 52, shared that story during a meeting at Magee Rehab recently, his audience lauded him. "You've been practicing!" speech language pathologist Sarah Lantz said. "That's good. That's real good. " Mottolo has aphasia, the loss of the ability to use language because of damage to the brain.
NEWS
May 22, 1999 | By Linda Loyd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A 7-year-old Oregon boy left blind and unable to speak or walk after a heart operation six years ago won a $15.2 million judgment yesterday against Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, his surgeon and a technician who assisted. Alec Sears was born in a Portland suburb with a heart defect. Mark and Vicki Sears brought their son to Children's Hospital for a series of heart operations when he was one week old, six months old and 13 months old. The procedure had been pioneered at Children's Hospital, although by 1993 the surgery was being performed at medical centers around the country.
NEWS
August 24, 2000 | by Yvonne Latty , Daily News Staff Writer
Three years ago David Caruso Jr. was a charismatic young man who was engaged and working toward a future in the music industry. He walked into Neumann Medical Center in Fishtown feeling weak and suffering from what he thought were flu symptoms. A few days later, a series of mistakes by doctors and a nurse left him brain-damaged. Now, he can't speak or move. He has no control over his bowels and bladder. He can only open his mouth wide enough to have his teeth brushed. On Tuesday, a civil court jury awarded Caruso $49 million in the largest medical malpractice judgment ever in Pennsylvania, according to his attorney, Shanin Specter.
NEWS
October 21, 2012 | By Robert Barr, Associated Press
LONDON - The British hospital treating a Pakistani teenager shot in the head by the Taliban raised hopes for her recovery Friday when doctors said she was able to stand with some help and to write. Malala Yousufzai, 15, appeared with her eyes open and alert as she lay in a hospital bed, in the first photographs released by the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham since she arrived from Pakistan on Monday. It was a series of positive developments since the shooting, which was a brazen bid by the Taliban to silence Yousufzai, who has been an outspoken advocate for girls' right to education.
SPORTS
April 4, 2016 | By Phil Anastasia, Staff Writer
Someday, Mike Shinske might take up golf. Someday, he might buy himself a set of clubs and settle into a weekend routine of a relaxing 18. Someday, he might look back and laugh at his reaction at this time last year when a well-meaning doctor suggested he might want to take up the sport. "Golf?" Shinske remembers saying in the hospital room. "I hate golf. " In time, Shinske might grow to appreciate the challenge of chasing that little white ball around the course. For now, he'll stick with lacrosse.
NEWS
March 21, 2001 | By Mary Anne Janco INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A Philadelphia man pleaded guilty yesterday to sexually assaulting a 17-year-old girl while she was being treated for a severe brain injury in the pediatrics ward of Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital in Darby Borough. Joseph Cash, 37, of the 4500 block of North 18th Street, pleaded guilty to aggravated indecent assault. Under a negotiated agreement, he faces three to six years in prison. He is free on bail and will be sentenced June 22 by Delaware County Court Judge Robert C. Wright. According to Assistant District Attorney Michelle Rotella, Cash knew the girl before she was hit by a tractor-trailer in 1998 and sustained severe injuries, including brain damage.
NEWS
April 1, 2012 | By Melissa Dribben, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ten years ago on April 5, Lauren Bilski was on the edge of her 12th-row seat next to her dad watching her beloved Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins play, when a hockey puck hurtled off the ice, slammed her in the mouth, fractured her jaw and knocked out three teeth. Her father, Joe, remembers hearing the sickening thud of the impact, and turning to see his shocked daughter holding her face. Lauren, who was 10 at the time, remembers the blood drenching her favorite Penguins jersey which had been signed by all the team's players.
NEWS
July 10, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
In an accelerated project announced Wednesday by the research arm of the Pentagon, University of Pennsylvania scientists will lead a complex national effort to treat memory impairment by delivering very small doses of electricity to the brain. The agency is funding the $22.5 million, four-year effort to seek treatments for the thousands of returning veterans who have suffered traumatic brain injury. A similar $15 million project is to be led by the University of California, Los Angeles.
NEWS
August 20, 2012 | By Monica Yant Kinney, Inquirer Columnist
To explore the spare bedrooms that have become Ric Owens' unlikely studio and gallery is both exhausting and invigorating. Rare is the confined space that documents a man's evolution in real time. Every turn reveals how art is speaking to - shouting at, really - someone who never even doodled before being hit by an 18-wheeler and suffering a concussion that rewired his brain. On the bench of a repurposed Bowflex machine sit stacks of geometric ink drawings. These inaugural sketches led to subtle watercolors that, in turn, inspired an acrylic, three-dimensional explosion.
NEWS
November 1, 1997 | By Jere Downs, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A New Jersey woman who emerged from childbirth at Temple University Hospital severely brain-damaged was awarded $8 million yesterday by a jury of the Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas. Rose Arnold, 34, a former securities examiner who has an MBA from Rutgers University, suffered brain damage when she was denied oxygen for several minutes during the 1994 cesarean-section delivery of her first child, said her lawyer, Daniel Weinstock. "She was an educated, intelligent woman," Weinstock said.
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