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Brain Injury

NEWS
June 10, 2015 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
JOSHUA GUTIERREZ showed no remorse yesterday as he pleaded guilty to third-degree murder in the death two years ago of his baby daughter and to numerous other crimes. When Common Pleas Judge Lillian Ransom asked if he wanted to say anything, Gutierrez, 24, simply said "no. " Under a negotiated plea deal, Gutierrez was sentenced to 25 to 55 years in state prison. Assistant District Attorney Nicholas Liermann said that on June 21, 2013, Gutierrez, who was "in and out of the picture" when it came to his daughter, Amarianna Gutierrez, then 5 months, 22 days old, offered to babysit her. The child's mother had just gotten a job, but didn't have a babysitter on this day. She lived with her father on Mulberry Street near Foulkrod in Frankford.
NEWS
May 22, 1999 | By Linda Loyd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A 7-year-old Oregon boy left blind and unable to speak or walk after a heart operation six years ago won a $15.2 million judgment yesterday against Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, his surgeon and a technician who assisted. Alec Sears was born in a Portland suburb with a heart defect. Mark and Vicki Sears brought their son to Children's Hospital for a series of heart operations when he was one week old, six months old and 13 months old. The procedure had been pioneered at Children's Hospital, although by 1993 the surgery was being performed at medical centers around the country.
NEWS
August 24, 2000 | by Yvonne Latty , Daily News Staff Writer
Three years ago David Caruso Jr. was a charismatic young man who was engaged and working toward a future in the music industry. He walked into Neumann Medical Center in Fishtown feeling weak and suffering from what he thought were flu symptoms. A few days later, a series of mistakes by doctors and a nurse left him brain-damaged. Now, he can't speak or move. He has no control over his bowels and bladder. He can only open his mouth wide enough to have his teeth brushed. On Tuesday, a civil court jury awarded Caruso $49 million in the largest medical malpractice judgment ever in Pennsylvania, according to his attorney, Shanin Specter.
NEWS
October 21, 2012 | By Robert Barr, Associated Press
LONDON - The British hospital treating a Pakistani teenager shot in the head by the Taliban raised hopes for her recovery Friday when doctors said she was able to stand with some help and to write. Malala Yousufzai, 15, appeared with her eyes open and alert as she lay in a hospital bed, in the first photographs released by the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham since she arrived from Pakistan on Monday. It was a series of positive developments since the shooting, which was a brazen bid by the Taliban to silence Yousufzai, who has been an outspoken advocate for girls' right to education.
NEWS
March 21, 2001 | By Mary Anne Janco INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A Philadelphia man pleaded guilty yesterday to sexually assaulting a 17-year-old girl while she was being treated for a severe brain injury in the pediatrics ward of Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital in Darby Borough. Joseph Cash, 37, of the 4500 block of North 18th Street, pleaded guilty to aggravated indecent assault. Under a negotiated agreement, he faces three to six years in prison. He is free on bail and will be sentenced June 22 by Delaware County Court Judge Robert C. Wright. According to Assistant District Attorney Michelle Rotella, Cash knew the girl before she was hit by a tractor-trailer in 1998 and sustained severe injuries, including brain damage.
NEWS
April 1, 2012 | By Melissa Dribben, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ten years ago on April 5, Lauren Bilski was on the edge of her 12th-row seat next to her dad watching her beloved Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins play, when a hockey puck hurtled off the ice, slammed her in the mouth, fractured her jaw and knocked out three teeth. Her father, Joe, remembers hearing the sickening thud of the impact, and turning to see his shocked daughter holding her face. Lauren, who was 10 at the time, remembers the blood drenching her favorite Penguins jersey which had been signed by all the team's players.
NEWS
April 23, 2014
A year ago, the Boston Marathon became a terrorist target chosen with what seemed like horrible precision. The bombing killed three, injured hundreds, and marred an iconic sporting event that resists security by its sprawling nature. The life of a metropolis was paralyzed as the perpetrators were hunted down. A year later, however, the marathon stands as a fortress of civic will. Athletes who train to run 26.2 miles heedless of typical human limitations - and, this being the Boston Marathon, some of the best among them - are not easily cowed by one more obstacle.
NEWS
July 10, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
In an accelerated project announced Wednesday by the research arm of the Pentagon, University of Pennsylvania scientists will lead a complex national effort to treat memory impairment by delivering very small doses of electricity to the brain. The agency is funding the $22.5 million, four-year effort to seek treatments for the thousands of returning veterans who have suffered traumatic brain injury. A similar $15 million project is to be led by the University of California, Los Angeles.
NEWS
June 4, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
Delorian Davis was just 18 months old when a carjacked Ford Explorer plowed into a group of people on a North Philadelphia sidewalk, killing her 4-year-old sister, Lucretia, and putting her into a coma. Almost 20 years later, on Jan. 10, 2013, Davis died in the Philadelphia home where her mother and teams of nurses had cared for her, so well that the pathologist who did the autopsy said the young woman's body did not have a single bedsore or scar. Now, the two convicted carjackers, each serving 26- to 52-year sentences for third-degree murder in Lucretia Davis' death, will be tried on charges of third-degree murder in Delorian Davis' case.
NEWS
October 24, 2014 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Is she dead or isn't she? Jahi McMath, 13, was declared brain-dead in December after her heart temporarily stopped during a tonsillectomy in Oakland, Calif. The tragedy drew national attention when the girl's mother, Nailah Winkfield, persuaded a judge in January to allow her to remove the body from the hospital, still on life support. The mother brought the girl to New Jersey, where the law allows a family to refuse to remove life support from brain-dead patients for religious reasons.
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