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NEWS
May 22, 1999 | By Linda Loyd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A 7-year-old Oregon boy left blind and unable to speak or walk after a heart operation six years ago won a $15.2 million judgment yesterday against Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, his surgeon and a technician who assisted. Alec Sears was born in a Portland suburb with a heart defect. Mark and Vicki Sears brought their son to Children's Hospital for a series of heart operations when he was one week old, six months old and 13 months old. The procedure had been pioneered at Children's Hospital, although by 1993 the surgery was being performed at medical centers around the country.
NEWS
August 24, 2000 | by Yvonne Latty , Daily News Staff Writer
Three years ago David Caruso Jr. was a charismatic young man who was engaged and working toward a future in the music industry. He walked into Neumann Medical Center in Fishtown feeling weak and suffering from what he thought were flu symptoms. A few days later, a series of mistakes by doctors and a nurse left him brain-damaged. Now, he can't speak or move. He has no control over his bowels and bladder. He can only open his mouth wide enough to have his teeth brushed. On Tuesday, a civil court jury awarded Caruso $49 million in the largest medical malpractice judgment ever in Pennsylvania, according to his attorney, Shanin Specter.
NEWS
October 21, 2012 | By Robert Barr, Associated Press
LONDON - The British hospital treating a Pakistani teenager shot in the head by the Taliban raised hopes for her recovery Friday when doctors said she was able to stand with some help and to write. Malala Yousufzai, 15, appeared with her eyes open and alert as she lay in a hospital bed, in the first photographs released by the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham since she arrived from Pakistan on Monday. It was a series of positive developments since the shooting, which was a brazen bid by the Taliban to silence Yousufzai, who has been an outspoken advocate for girls' right to education.
NEWS
December 7, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
For decades, researchers have been seeking a blood test that could diagnose a concussion and tell whether it is severe enough to cause lasting brain damage. In a big step toward that holy grail, University of Pennsylvania scientists have found that a blood protein called SNTF surged and stayed elevated in professional hockey players with persistent concussion symptoms, but not in players who recovered within a few days. "These results show that SNTF has promise as a blood biomarker for sports-related concussion," said Robert Siman, a research professor of neurosurgery at Penn and lead author of the study in last month's Journal of Neurotrauma.
NEWS
November 24, 2013 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Most people who get a concussion seem to regain normal brain function within a month or two at most. But doctors have no way to predict which patients are in that group and which will suffer long-term cognitive problems. A team from the University of Pennsylvania and Baylor College of Medicine seeks to solve that riddle with a simple blood test. In a new study in the journal Frontiers in Neurology, the team reported that a protein called SNTF is a promising indicator of which patients with concussions are likely to experience chronic brain deficits.
NEWS
March 21, 2001 | By Mary Anne Janco INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A Philadelphia man pleaded guilty yesterday to sexually assaulting a 17-year-old girl while she was being treated for a severe brain injury in the pediatrics ward of Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital in Darby Borough. Joseph Cash, 37, of the 4500 block of North 18th Street, pleaded guilty to aggravated indecent assault. Under a negotiated agreement, he faces three to six years in prison. He is free on bail and will be sentenced June 22 by Delaware County Court Judge Robert C. Wright. According to Assistant District Attorney Michelle Rotella, Cash knew the girl before she was hit by a tractor-trailer in 1998 and sustained severe injuries, including brain damage.
NEWS
April 1, 2012 | By Melissa Dribben, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ten years ago on April 5, Lauren Bilski was on the edge of her 12th-row seat next to her dad watching her beloved Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins play, when a hockey puck hurtled off the ice, slammed her in the mouth, fractured her jaw and knocked out three teeth. Her father, Joe, remembers hearing the sickening thud of the impact, and turning to see his shocked daughter holding her face. Lauren, who was 10 at the time, remembers the blood drenching her favorite Penguins jersey which had been signed by all the team's players.
NEWS
June 4, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
Delorian Davis was just 18 months old when a carjacked Ford Explorer plowed into a group of people on a North Philadelphia sidewalk, killing her 4-year-old sister, Lucretia, and putting her into a coma. Almost 20 years later, on Jan. 10, 2013, Davis died in the Philadelphia home where her mother and teams of nurses had cared for her, so well that the pathologist who did the autopsy said the young woman's body did not have a single bedsore or scar. Now, the two convicted carjackers, each serving 26- to 52-year sentences for third-degree murder in Lucretia Davis' death, will be tried on charges of third-degree murder in Delorian Davis' case.
NEWS
October 5, 2010 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Four Eagles games, four concussions - the latest two suffered by wide receiver Riley Cooper and cornerback Asante Samuel on Sunday. Coach Andy Reid said Monday that their injuries "seem to be mild," but that word seem is telling. From a scientific perspective, no one really knows. Physicians can see when someone's outward symptoms have returned to normal, as most do within a few weeks. But there is no lab test to measure internal damage from a concussion and no medicine to treat it. "Absolutely nobody knows when it's safe to go back in," said Douglas H. Smith, director of the University of Pennsylvania's Center for Brain Injury and Repair.
NEWS
November 1, 1997 | By Jere Downs, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A New Jersey woman who emerged from childbirth at Temple University Hospital severely brain-damaged was awarded $8 million yesterday by a jury of the Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas. Rose Arnold, 34, a former securities examiner who has an MBA from Rutgers University, suffered brain damage when she was denied oxygen for several minutes during the 1994 cesarean-section delivery of her first child, said her lawyer, Daniel Weinstock. "She was an educated, intelligent woman," Weinstock said.
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