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Brain Injury

SPORTS
June 4, 2012 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Staff Writer
Doug Smith has studied brain trauma for 20 years. For most of that time, the Penn professor of neurosurgery said, injuries such as concussions were called the silent epidemic. Doctors knew of their consequences, but the brain injuries were often shrugged off as part of sports, something to be shaken off so athletes could return to play. No longer. The issue has exploded into the national discussion, gaining steam as evidence piles up about the potentially devastating effects of concussions, particularly in football, America's most popular sport.
NEWS
September 28, 2005 | By Stewart L. Cohen
I am a pro football fan, a lifelong Eagles fan, so I fully appreciate that the all-popular sport can bring attention to social issues in a way that few other things can. On its Sept. 18 Sportscenter program, ESPN televised a report about two football players who also have an interest in riding motorcycles. One of them, Jamie Henderson, a former defensive back for the New York Jets, was in a motorcycle accident in April 2004. Despite his injuries, he is now conditioning himself to get back into pro football.
NEWS
May 22, 1999 | By Linda Loyd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A 7-year-old Oregon boy left blind and unable to speak or walk after a heart operation six years ago won a $15.2 million judgment yesterday against Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, his surgeon and a technician who assisted. Alec Sears was born in a Portland suburb with a heart defect. Mark and Vicki Sears brought their son to Children's Hospital for a series of heart operations when he was one week old, six months old and 13 months old. The procedure had been pioneered at Children's Hospital, although by 1993 the surgery was being performed at medical centers around the country.
NEWS
August 24, 2000 | by Yvonne Latty , Daily News Staff Writer
Three years ago David Caruso Jr. was a charismatic young man who was engaged and working toward a future in the music industry. He walked into Neumann Medical Center in Fishtown feeling weak and suffering from what he thought were flu symptoms. A few days later, a series of mistakes by doctors and a nurse left him brain-damaged. Now, he can't speak or move. He has no control over his bowels and bladder. He can only open his mouth wide enough to have his teeth brushed. On Tuesday, a civil court jury awarded Caruso $49 million in the largest medical malpractice judgment ever in Pennsylvania, according to his attorney, Shanin Specter.
NEWS
October 21, 2012 | By Robert Barr, Associated Press
LONDON - The British hospital treating a Pakistani teenager shot in the head by the Taliban raised hopes for her recovery Friday when doctors said she was able to stand with some help and to write. Malala Yousufzai, 15, appeared with her eyes open and alert as she lay in a hospital bed, in the first photographs released by the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham since she arrived from Pakistan on Monday. It was a series of positive developments since the shooting, which was a brazen bid by the Taliban to silence Yousufzai, who has been an outspoken advocate for girls' right to education.
NEWS
March 21, 2001 | By Mary Anne Janco INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A Philadelphia man pleaded guilty yesterday to sexually assaulting a 17-year-old girl while she was being treated for a severe brain injury in the pediatrics ward of Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital in Darby Borough. Joseph Cash, 37, of the 4500 block of North 18th Street, pleaded guilty to aggravated indecent assault. Under a negotiated agreement, he faces three to six years in prison. He is free on bail and will be sentenced June 22 by Delaware County Court Judge Robert C. Wright. According to Assistant District Attorney Michelle Rotella, Cash knew the girl before she was hit by a tractor-trailer in 1998 and sustained severe injuries, including brain damage.
NEWS
April 1, 2012 | By Melissa Dribben, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ten years ago on April 5, Lauren Bilski was on the edge of her 12th-row seat next to her dad watching her beloved Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins play, when a hockey puck hurtled off the ice, slammed her in the mouth, fractured her jaw and knocked out three teeth. Her father, Joe, remembers hearing the sickening thud of the impact, and turning to see his shocked daughter holding her face. Lauren, who was 10 at the time, remembers the blood drenching her favorite Penguins jersey which had been signed by all the team's players.
NEWS
October 13, 2012 | By Joe Trinacria, Inquirer Staff Writer
Henry Walter Isenberg, 88, a survivor of Hitler's pre-World War II Nazi Germany, died from a brain injury on Friday, Oct. 5, at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Mr. Isenberg immigrated to the United States in 1936 at age 12, leaving his family in their hometown, Magdeburg. He was one of the many Jewish children rescued before the start of World War II. In the United States, Mr. Isenberg was taken in by a foster family in Terre Haute, Ind., where he learned English and attended school.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2012 | Dear Abby
DEAR ABBY: My two children were in a terrible car accident and were both airlifted to a children's hospital. My son was released two weeks later, but my daughter is still there, suffering from traumatic brain injury. Abby, I was driving the car. Why is she being punished and not me? — Anguished Mother DEAR ANGUISHED: You're asking a question that philosophers have pondered for centuries — why bad things happen to good people. In many cases the answer is simply "fate.
NEWS
July 10, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
In an accelerated project announced Wednesday by the research arm of the Pentagon, University of Pennsylvania scientists will lead a complex national effort to treat memory impairment by delivering very small doses of electricity to the brain. The agency is funding the $22.5 million, four-year effort to seek treatments for the thousands of returning veterans who have suffered traumatic brain injury. A similar $15 million project is to be led by the University of California, Los Angeles.
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