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Brain Injury

SPORTS
January 12, 2014 | By Tim McManus, Inquirer Staff Writer
Greg Merril held a lacrosse helmet above his head Friday afternoon at the Convention Center. A crowd had gathered around his booth at the US Lacrosse National Convention, and the founder and CEO of Brain Sentry was explaining what would happen if he let it drop. Affixed to its rear, the helmet had a small impact sensor, made by his company, Brain Sentry. When the helmet registers the kind of shock powerful enough to cause a concussion - such as being dropped from a height - the device emits a strong red LED light visible from 30 yards away in bright sunlight.
NEWS
June 23, 2009 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Matt Miller was determined to resume his life where he'd left off - even completing his fall semester as a junior at the University of Virginia. Matt left the hospital Nov. 26, sooner than anyone had expected, and a few days later scheduled a physics midterm for Dec. 8. The 20-year-old from St. Davids, training for a triathlon, had broken every bone in his face and suffered brain injury on Nov. 2, when he lost control of his bike and smashed, face-first, into a car going 40 miles an hour.
NEWS
April 3, 2012 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Ten years ago on April 5, Lauren Bilski was on the edge of her 12th-row seat next to her father watching her beloved Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins play, when a hockey puck hurtled off the ice, slammed her in the mouth, fractured her jaw, and knocked out three teeth. Her father, Joe, remembers hearing the sickening thud of the impact and turning to see his shocked daughter holding her face. Lauren, 10 at the time, remembers the blood drenching her favorite Penguins jersey, which all the team's players had signed.
NEWS
December 3, 2009
The National Football League needs to move beyond its incremental steps to combat player brain injuries. Two concussion-injured Super Bowl quarterbacks had to sit out games last Sunday, and yet another Eagles player suffered a game-ending blow to the head. But the best NFL officials could do was leak to the press another tidbit about their safety moves. That's a bad message about player safety that filters down to every kid in college, high school, or even younger who plays football.
NEWS
July 25, 1996 | By Eddie Olsen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An internationally known forensic pathologist testified yesterday that 4-year-old Chentele Marie Stenger suffered an immediate "brain death" in her fatal 1993 fall and couldn't have been saved even if it had happened in "a hospital setting. " Werner U. Spitz, 70, former medical examiner of Wayne County, Mich., and the author of a widely used reference book on forensic pathology, testified in the murder trial of Matthew Roncone that the injuries suffered by Stenger were consistent with those suffered in an accidental fall.
NEWS
November 17, 1993 | By Linda Loyd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Huntingdon Valley man was sentenced to 11 to 40 years in prison yesterday after pleading guilty to abducting five teenage girls and raping a woman in various incidents in Northeast Philadelphia. Christopher Toland, a former Widener University student, was arrested Jan. 30, shortly after the last abduction attempt. He was picked up at Comly Street and Harbison Avenue about 15 minutes after he tried to abduct a 13-year-old girl on Algard Street. The girl, like the other victims, fought her way free.
NEWS
November 24, 2013 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Most people who get a concussion seem to regain normal brain function within a month or two at most. But doctors have no way to predict which patients are in that group and which will suffer long-term cognitive problems. A team from the University of Pennsylvania and Baylor College of Medicine seeks to solve that riddle with a simple blood test. In a new study in the journal Frontiers in Neurology, the team reported that a protein called SNTF is a promising indicator of which patients with concussions are likely to experience chronic brain deficits.
SPORTS
May 4, 2012 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sadness and another round of concern over head injuries in football followed reports of Junior Seau's suicide Wednesday. "Tough to hear the news about Junior Seau. One of the best LBs to play the game," Eagles linebacker Casey Matthews wrote on Twitter. "Had his throwback USC #55 jersey. 1 of the reasons I was 55. " Matthews grew up near USC and wore 55 in college. "Saddened to hear the news about Seau. Thoughts and prayers are with his family," Eagles linebacker DeMeco Ryans posted on Twitter.
NEWS
April 27, 2012 | By Joelle Farrell, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
It took six years, political pressure, and an online petition signed by 80,000 in a matter of days. But Thursday, Key Bank finally forgave the student loan for a Marlton student who died from a traumatic brain injury in 2006. "They said, ‘Effective immediately the remaining balance is forgiven,' " said Ryan Bryski, whose brother Christopher died after a fall. In a phone call Wednesday evening, an employee from Key Bank told the Bryskis, "We don't want to put you through any more undue hardship," Ryan said.
NEWS
March 23, 1989 | By Ellen Pulver, Special to The Inquirer
An attempted-homicide charge was filed against a 14-year-old Collingdale boy after borough police found him kicking a 13-year-old boy Sunday while two other youths looked on, police said. The victim, a student at Elwyn Institute, was identified as David Stahl, of the 700 block of Spruce Street, Collingdale. He was listed in serious condition yesterday in the intensive-care unit of Mercy Catholic Medical Center's Fitzgerald Mercy Division, a hospital spokeswoman said. Collingdale Police Officer Robert Adams gave the following account.
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