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Brain Injury

NEWS
May 6, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
While preparing to remove a malignant tumor from the Rev. Michael Prewitt's brain, neurosurgeon Steven Brem of the University of Pennsylvania worried that the surgery could affect his patient's ability to speak or move. As surgeons have for decades, he studied an MRI that showed the tumor in Prewitt's left parietal lobe. But he also examined a type of scan you've probably never heard of: diffusion tensor imaging. It shows bundles of the fibers that transmit messages from parts of the brain to one another and the brain stem.
NEWS
March 21, 2013 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
A former babysitter was sentenced Tuesday to 10 to 20 years in prison and five years of probation for the December 2011 death of a toddler in her care. Heather Hess, 25, of Upper Chichester, was convicted in January of third-degree murder and involuntary manslaughter for the death of 2 1/2-year-old David Miller Jr. When police responded to Hess' Hewes Avenue residence on a report of a child in respiratory distress, paramedics were trying to treat the boy. According to a criminal complaint, Hess told officers that she had been cooking when she went into the family room and found the boy unconscious.
NEWS
January 12, 2013 | By Kathleen Tinney, Inquirer Staff Writer
Every year, 1.7 million Americans suffer traumatic brain injuries, the result of car accidents, sports, gunshots, and mishaps as seemingly minor as a slip and fall. The rehabilitative path on which many embark was paved in part by Dr. Irwin W. Pollack. A professor of psychiatry and neurology at New Jersey's Robert Wood Johnson Medical School from 1968 to 1998, Dr. Pollack was among the pioneers of an integrated therapy now standard in the field. Where disabilities once were treated piecemeal, he marshaled myriad specialties in a team effort to give head-injury patients if not their old lives back, then new lives.
NEWS
January 11, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
DR. IRWIN W. POLLACK gave hope when there seemed to be no hope. A heartbroken parent would come to him and say, "This is my son, but he isn't anybody I know. " A wife would say, "This is my husband, but he's a different person. " These were victims of devastating brain injuries, struck down in accidents, muggings and other trauma. Their injuries often rendered them unable to function. They sat in dark rooms, lost in the underworld of cognitive emptiness. But to Dr. Pollack there was always hope.
NEWS
January 4, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
For a problem that has no doubt been around as long as humans have been falling on hard objects and bashing one another's skulls with clubs, brain injuries are still surprisingly mysterious. Scientists, including a cadre at the University of Pennsylvania, are lifting the veil, though, and what they're seeing is already "dramatically" changing American sports, said Douglas Smith, who heads Penn's Center for Brain Injury and Repair. Everyone from parents to pro athletes to military leaders is suddenly paying more attention to "mild" brain injuries, or concussions, and their long-term consequences.
NEWS
November 25, 2012 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than seven months since he was nearly killed by a hit-and-run driver, 17-year-old David Silva lay Wednesday in a hospital bed set up in his family's dining room in Tacony, where a nurse makes sure he doesn't rip out the tube that helps him breathe. He reached his left arm over his head and pulled open his right eyelid, watching as a reporter entered the room. At his mother's instruction, he waved. "I know my son's still there," Dorothy Robbins said. But "with brain injuries, there's really nothing they can tell you. " Though David is making progress, Robbins doesn't know how long it could take her son, who is semiconscious and cannot speak, to recover.
SPORTS
November 19, 2012
LANDOVER, Md. – Turn off the searchlights. No superhero is coming down from the skies to rescue these Eagles. No miracle is coming along to save Andy Reid and his dreadful football team. At this point, Reid can only hope the Mayans were right and the world ends before the regular season. It has gone beyond embarrassing, past sad and is on the way to scary. It is bad enough the present is tarnishing Reid's past accomplishments as a head coach. But now we've reached the stage where the present dysfunction is also threatening the future.
NEWS
November 16, 2012 | By Kevin Turner
Football has always been a big part of my life. It's a game of toughness and character that teaches important lessons about teamwork and responsibility. But I believe it's my duty to speak out about what has happened to me and many other football players. As I continue to battle amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig's disease, I hope to draw attention to the problem of concussions in professional football. I am just one of many former players who suffer from devastating brain and other neurological injuries - injuries that could have been prevented if the NFL had been honest about the risks.
SPORTS
November 13, 2012 | By Phil Sheridan, Inquirer Columnist
In dealing with his latest quarterback conundrum, Eagles coach Andy Reid has to follow the lead of an unlikely person. Marcus Vick. That doesn't mean Reid should trade Michael Vick, as Vick's younger brother implored in a Twitter rant during the seven-sack debacle in New Orleans. That tweet got all the attention. Everyone overlooked this one: "I don't want to see brother with brain problems by the time he 45. Everybody have a job to do so do it. They all professionals" In answering questions about his quarterbacks Monday afternoon, Reid was like a (not especially graceful)
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