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Brain Injury

NEWS
November 16, 2012 | By Kevin Turner
Football has always been a big part of my life. It's a game of toughness and character that teaches important lessons about teamwork and responsibility. But I believe it's my duty to speak out about what has happened to me and many other football players. As I continue to battle amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig's disease, I hope to draw attention to the problem of concussions in professional football. I am just one of many former players who suffer from devastating brain and other neurological injuries - injuries that could have been prevented if the NFL had been honest about the risks.
SPORTS
November 13, 2012 | By Phil Sheridan, Inquirer Columnist
In dealing with his latest quarterback conundrum, Eagles coach Andy Reid has to follow the lead of an unlikely person. Marcus Vick. That doesn't mean Reid should trade Michael Vick, as Vick's younger brother implored in a Twitter rant during the seven-sack debacle in New Orleans. That tweet got all the attention. Everyone overlooked this one: "I don't want to see brother with brain problems by the time he 45. Everybody have a job to do so do it. They all professionals" In answering questions about his quarterbacks Monday afternoon, Reid was like a (not especially graceful)
NEWS
October 21, 2012 | By Robert Barr, Associated Press
LONDON - The British hospital treating a Pakistani teenager shot in the head by the Taliban raised hopes for her recovery Friday when doctors said she was able to stand with some help and to write. Malala Yousufzai, 15, appeared with her eyes open and alert as she lay in a hospital bed, in the first photographs released by the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham since she arrived from Pakistan on Monday. It was a series of positive developments since the shooting, which was a brazen bid by the Taliban to silence Yousufzai, who has been an outspoken advocate for girls' right to education.
NEWS
October 18, 2012 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer
This obituary has been corrected. BOB REHL was up every day at the crack of dawn to whip up eggs and pancakes for his family's breakfast. Bob was a stay-at-home dad after suffering a debilitating injury as a police officer in 1969, and he was devoted to the care and maintenance of his children, including serving as a taxi service whenever anyone needed to get somewhere. Robert J. Rehl Sr., a Philadelphia Police officer from 1965 to 1969, a determined man who fought his disabilities to remain active, a man who cherished his friends and family and liked nothing better than watching the local sports teams on TV with a beer and good fellowship, died in his sleep Oct. 14. He was 70 and was living in the Quakertown Center Nursing Home.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2012 | By Lini S. Kadaba, For The Inquirer
Candace Gantt bends over her Trek handlebars, her back racer-flat. She's concentrating on the stretch of pavement ahead as she negotiates the gentle hills and valleys of the narrow, two-lane road in Willistown Township. Biking is one of her fondest joys. Two weeks earlier, this tall and tanned 48-year-old, with a resting heart rate of 48, had completed her first Half Ironman at Lake Placid, N.Y. On this clear day, July 21, 2005, while daughters Carter, 11, and Morgan, 4, are at camp, Gantt and her training buddy Mary Wood are four miles into a new 15-mile route.
NEWS
October 13, 2012 | By Joe Trinacria, Inquirer Staff Writer
Henry Walter Isenberg, 88, a survivor of Hitler's pre-World War II Nazi Germany, died from a brain injury on Friday, Oct. 5, at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Mr. Isenberg immigrated to the United States in 1936 at age 12, leaving his family in their hometown, Magdeburg. He was one of the many Jewish children rescued before the start of World War II. In the United States, Mr. Isenberg was taken in by a foster family in Terre Haute, Ind., where he learned English and attended school.
SPORTS
September 13, 2012
The Reds are giving fireballing closer Aroldis Chapman a few days off to rest his tired pitching shoulder. The lefthander struggled with his control and hit only 96 m.p.h. on the radar gun Monday night during a 14-inning, 4-3 win over Pittsburgh. Normally, his heat is more in the range of 98 to 101 m.p.h. Chapman walked three of the five batters he faced in the 10th inning and had to be taken out during an inning for the first time this season. Afterward, he was examined and a tired shoulder was diagnosed.
SPORTS
September 6, 2012 | DAILY NEWS WIRE REPORTS
A WOMAN HAS sued Nebraska coach Bo Pelini's foundation and offensive coordinator Tim Beck, alleging she suffered a traumatic brain injury while participating in a drill at a football clinic put on by the foundation 2 years ago. Beverly Morgan, 66, of Lincoln said in the lawsuit filed Tuesday in Lancaster County Court that she fell and hit the back of her head during a drill in which a gauntlet of women struck her with blocking pads. The fall caused her cap and earrings to fly off, according to the lawsuit.
NEWS
August 20, 2012 | By Monica Yant Kinney, Inquirer Columnist
To explore the spare bedrooms that have become Ric Owens' unlikely studio and gallery is both exhausting and invigorating. Rare is the confined space that documents a man's evolution in real time. Every turn reveals how art is speaking to - shouting at, really - someone who never even doodled before being hit by an 18-wheeler and suffering a concussion that rewired his brain. On the bench of a repurposed Bowflex machine sit stacks of geometric ink drawings. These inaugural sketches led to subtle watercolors that, in turn, inspired an acrylic, three-dimensional explosion.
SPORTS
August 3, 2012 | By Les Bowen and Daily News Staff Writer
BETHLEHEM – Wednesday was Chad Hall's third Military Day with the Eagles at Lehigh. Two years ago, when Hall was a rookie, a couple of months removed from his 2-year active-duty stint as an Air Force second lieutenant, he would discover close connections with the 300 or so service personnel invited onto the field after training-camp practice – they had friends in common, maybe places they'd served. That might not be as true now, as Hall's time as the 421st Fighter Squadron's assistant commander for maintenance fades into the past, but many of Hall's classmates in the Air Force Academy of 2008 remain in harm's way. He emails and talks regularly with people who have been affected by the war. It is never far from his mind, even though an NFL locker room is about as far away from Tikrit or Kabul as you can get, in so many ways.
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