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Brain Tissue

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NEWS
November 28, 2011 | By Mitchell Hecht, For The Inquirer
Question: For years, I've had a glass of warm milk to help me fall asleep. I think it works as well as a sleeping pill, but it's a lot safer and is natural - which I like. Is it the tryptophan in the milk that causes me to feel sleepy? Answer: Warm milk at bedtime definitely can have a calming effect, but despite popular belief, it's probably not caused by the effect of the amino acid tryptophan on the brain. In order for tryptophan or any sleep-promoting drug to work, it must cross the "blood-brain barrier" and get from the bloodstream into the brain tissue.
NEWS
April 25, 2012 | By Peter Mucha, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The man who handled a rabid red fox in Wayne on Monday has been found, according to the state Health Department. He seems to be fine, said spokeswoman Holli Senior. He wasn't bitten, which is the usual method of transmission. Saliva getting into an open wound would also be a worry. A pre-determination isn't feasible, since the only reliable test uses brain tissue. But a series of injections can prevent the disease from being fatal if begun within about 48 hours of infection.
LIVING
November 12, 1997 | By Lini S. Kadaba, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When a baby dies from shaking, the act isn't just a gentle jostle or a bounce - but something so forceful that brain tissue tears and blood vessels rip apart. "This is not the kind of injury that is trivial," said Cindy Christian, a pediatrician and director of Child Abuse Services at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. "It's extreme violence against a baby. " Called shaken baby syndrome, it is the type of child abuse at the heart of the highly publicized case of British au pair Louise Woodward.
NEWS
September 12, 1988 | Marc Schogol and including reports from Ladies' Home Journal magazine and Inquirer wire services
BRAIN SWAP. In an operation once considered nearly impossible, French scientists claim to have transplanted brain tissue from one species to another. In a study in the journal Science, the researchers report implanting into the brains of five chicken fetuses tissue taken from parts of the brains of Japanese quails. The resulting chickens made the call of the Japanese quail, not normal chicken sounds. INFANT TEST. A test of how long infants look at patterns and faces can help identify children at risk of showing mental disability by age 3, a researcher says.
LIVING
December 7, 1998 | By Faye Flam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Researcher Solomon Snyder is so soft-spoken that people need to stand close to hear him. But his work has a way of getting noticed - especially his research on a long underappreciated substance called nitric oxide. His 1994 paper titled "Nitric oxide as a mediator in penile erection" attracted widespread attention. Soon after it was published, a group at Pfizer Inc. realized why some patients taking an experimental heart drug - a drug designed to help the body release nitric oxide - were experiencing an odd and not altogether unwanted side effect.
SPORTS
September 2, 2015 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
WE'RE CALLING BS on the NFL. Yesterday, in response to the release of a trailer for the film "Concussion" starring Will Smith, the league issued the following statement: "We are encouraged by the ongoing focus on the critical issue of player health and safety. We have no higher priority. We all know more about this issue than we did 10 or 20 years ago. As we continue to learn more, we apply those learnings to make our game and players safer. " What a crock. The film stars Smith as Dr. Bennet Omalu, who discovered chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE, while doing an autopsy on the brain of Steelers center Mike Webster in 2002.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2012 | By Mitchell Hecht, For The Inquirer
Question: Can you comment on a report that chronic Ambien users are three times more likely to die of a heart attack? Answer: That's not exactly what the online-only British Medical Journal study reported. It reported that researchers compared the medical records of 10,529 people who received Ambien, Restoril, Lunesta, a sedating antihistamine like Benadryl, or some other sedative like Xanax for sleep with 23,676 who did not receive any sleeping pill over an average period of 21/2 years.
NEWS
January 7, 1988 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Three of four adults may be vulnerable to deadly diphtheria even if they have been vaccinated as children against the disease. The warning, published in today's edition of the New England Journal of Medicine, was issued by two Vanderbilt University doctors, who say that the medical community should work to have all adults revaccinated regularly. The concern has come after a diphtheria outbreak in Scandinavia, where virtually all of the people had been vaccinated as children.
NEWS
May 3, 1991 | by Marianne Costantinou, Daily News Staff Writer
Little Tyler Olson is clinging precariously to life. The toddler, who underwent emergency brain surgery Wednesday night, remained in critical condition in a coma this morning, said Dr. Leonard Graziani, director of pediatric neurology at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. "He has not awakened, nor is he alert," Graziani said. "He's still in a coma. "We would all have been delighted if Tyler had opened his eyes and looked around. But given all that Tyler has been through, it would be perhaps too much to ask. " While the four-hour brain surgery removed the immediate threat to Tyler's life, the boy's general condition "really is largely unchanged," Graziani said.
NEWS
November 19, 1990 | By Marc Schogol Compiled from reports from Inquirer wire services
MALLOPHOBIA You know how crowded shopping malls are now that the holiday season is here? Well, they would be even more crowded, except for the fact that thousands of Americans won't drive, shop at the mall or even venture out of the house because of fear they'll suffer a panic attack. "They're real afraid of being trapped and having this panic attack happen in front of a bunch of people, where they can't get out," says William T. Riley, co-director of the Anxiety Disorders Clinic at the Medical College of Virginia.
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SPORTS
September 2, 2015 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
WE'RE CALLING BS on the NFL. Yesterday, in response to the release of a trailer for the film "Concussion" starring Will Smith, the league issued the following statement: "We are encouraged by the ongoing focus on the critical issue of player health and safety. We have no higher priority. We all know more about this issue than we did 10 or 20 years ago. As we continue to learn more, we apply those learnings to make our game and players safer. " What a crock. The film stars Smith as Dr. Bennet Omalu, who discovered chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE, while doing an autopsy on the brain of Steelers center Mike Webster in 2002.
NEWS
January 19, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
The darkened room at Drexel University contains a 120-inch projection screen, a bunch of high-end 3-D glasses, and a custom-built computer with enough memory to make your laptop seem like a toaster oven. State-of-the-art equipment, in other words, for racing through a fantasy world to gun down virtual foes. Andrew R. Cohen and Eric Wait use it for something they find much more interesting: traveling through the brain of a mouse. The Drexel engineers and their colleagues have applied video-game technology to let biologists analyze and watch movies of the formation of brain cells - though the phrase "watch movies" hardly does it justice.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2012 | By Mitchell Hecht, For The Inquirer
Question: Can you comment on a report that chronic Ambien users are three times more likely to die of a heart attack? Answer: That's not exactly what the online-only British Medical Journal study reported. It reported that researchers compared the medical records of 10,529 people who received Ambien, Restoril, Lunesta, a sedating antihistamine like Benadryl, or some other sedative like Xanax for sleep with 23,676 who did not receive any sleeping pill over an average period of 21/2 years.
NEWS
April 25, 2012 | By Peter Mucha, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The man who handled a rabid red fox in Wayne on Monday has been found, according to the state Health Department. He seems to be fine, said spokeswoman Holli Senior. He wasn't bitten, which is the usual method of transmission. Saliva getting into an open wound would also be a worry. A pre-determination isn't feasible, since the only reliable test uses brain tissue. But a series of injections can prevent the disease from being fatal if begun within about 48 hours of infection.
NEWS
November 28, 2011 | By Mitchell Hecht, For The Inquirer
Question: For years, I've had a glass of warm milk to help me fall asleep. I think it works as well as a sleeping pill, but it's a lot safer and is natural - which I like. Is it the tryptophan in the milk that causes me to feel sleepy? Answer: Warm milk at bedtime definitely can have a calming effect, but despite popular belief, it's probably not caused by the effect of the amino acid tryptophan on the brain. In order for tryptophan or any sleep-promoting drug to work, it must cross the "blood-brain barrier" and get from the bloodstream into the brain tissue.
SPORTS
September 29, 2010 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Staff Writer
BOSTON - The first time Chris Nowinski asked for the brain of a dead athlete, he wrote out a script. That wasn't an easy call he was about to make to the family of Andre Waters after the former Eagles safety committed suicide in 2006. Nowinski believed that if he said one word wrong - "if I paused wrong" - the answer would be no. Since that phone call, which resulted in Nowinski obtaining access to some of Waters' brain tissue, the former Harvard football player and professional wrestler has joined with a research team at Boston University School of Medicine that is studying chronic traumatic encephalopathy or CTE, a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated head trauma.
NEWS
September 14, 2010 | By Mike Jensen and Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writers
A study of the brain tissue of Owen Thomas, a University of Pennsylvania football captain who committed suicide in April, reportedly revealed the beginning stages of a degenerative disease that is believed to be caused by repeated head trauma. A brain autopsy of Thomas showed chronic traumatic encephalopathy, the same disease found in more than 20 deceased NFL players, including former Eagles safety Andre Waters, who committed suicide in 2006 and was found to have suffered from late stages of the disease.
SPORTS
April 9, 2009 | By MARK KRAM, kramm@phillynews.com
UNDERSTANDABLY, it was not a subject he was eager to contemplate. Keith Primeau still is a young man at age 37. Too old and too battered for hockey, given the physical punishment he endured as a player, he has a wife, Lisa, four children, and years still unlived. But it seemed as if it was something he should do, a way he could contribute to the betterment of society. So he pondered it. He discussed it with Lisa. And he agreed to do it: The former Flyers star will bequeath his brain to the Center of Traumatic Encephalopathy at the Boston University School of Medicine.
NEWS
January 13, 2009 | By Marie McCullough INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Taking hormones after menopause appears to accelerate loss of brain tissue in women over 64, which may explain why the therapy had previously been linked to an increased risk of dementia and mental decline in elderly women. The brain-volume findings, published in today's issue of Neurology, are the latest from the Women's Health Initiative, a landmark government study of postmenopausal women. Over the last six years, it has firmly established that, contrary to decades of conventional wisdom, the risks of hormone therapy outweigh the benefits.
SPORTS
June 16, 2007 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Boston Bruins general manager Peter Chiarelli said yesterday that Dave Lewis had been relieved as head coach after just one season and would be reassigned within the organization. Lewis was 35-41-6 in his lone season on the Bruins' bench. He also was the head coach in Detroit from 2002 to '04, where he had a 96-41-21-6 record. The Associated Press said more than 7,000 season-ticket deposits were made Thursday in Hamilton, Ontario, the first day of sales to fans anticipating that the Nashville Predators will be relocated to the Canadian city.
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