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NEWS
November 18, 2011 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than five decades after the brain of Albert Einstein was preserved, partitioned, and distributed to the private collections of various hospitals and researchers, a set of the precious samples is now on public display. On Thursday, Lucy Rorke-Adams, a prominent neuropathologist at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, donated 46 slides containing Einstein's gray matter to the Mütter Museum of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia. "They are a very important part of medical history," said Rorke-Adams, 82, who received the slides from a colleague in the mid-1970s.
NEWS
October 26, 2015 | By Michael Vitez, For The Inquirer
Jackie Lithgow got out of his wheelchair at the starting line and began walking. He didn't think about the steps he was taking last weekend at the Flyers Charities 5K race. He just walked, and looked like anybody else walking, flanked by his parents and sister and grandmother and other family and friends, and that was the beauty of it. After a first few steps, the 20-year-old stopped to do a little dance move - what his parents might call the twist - right there in the middle of Pattison Avenue because he was happy and because he could.
NEWS
July 20, 2015 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Nothing about Lucy RorkeAdams is retiring. Not her crowded office in Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, lined with medical texts and stacks of professional journals, two microscopes at the ready. Certainly not her manner - forthright and candid, ready to provide detailed answers to every question posed. And yet, this month, Rorke-Adams, 86, senior pediatric neuropathologist at CHOP and clinical professor of pathology and laboratory medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, will retire after a career spanning more than a half-century at Children's and the old Philadelphia General Hospital, where she served her internship and residency.
NEWS
August 28, 1992 | By Walter F. Roche Jr., INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
This much is certain: Emanuel Johnson was shot dead in early January of last year outside a West Philadelphia bar. It's what happened to his brain - and 24 others - that is now in dispute. In a lawsuit filed in Philadelphia, Johnson's mother, Emeline Buell, has charged that her 23-year-old son's body was taken to the city Medical Examiner's Office. There, the suit charges, his brain was cut from his skull, treated in a chemical preservative and shipped to the University of Pennsylvania for use by medical students in an anatomy course.
NEWS
May 6, 1994 | By Walter F. Roche Jr., INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If he were still alive, Thomas Seabron would have celebrated his 29th birthday this spring. But there was no party. Instead a small army of lawyers will soon head for a small town in North Carolina to watch the exhumation of his body from a family plot in the Silver Hill Cemetery. "It's time for the truth to come out," said his mother, Doris Jackson, in an interview this week. The exhumation of Thomas Seabron's body is but the latest chapter in a battle between several Philadelphia families and the city's Medical Examiner's Office.
NEWS
August 9, 2013
YOU MIGHT not call him a brainiac, but Dr. Neal Barnard is certainly brainy. He takes care of his gray matter and wants you to take care of yours. He'll be at the Ethical Society Friday night to talk about it. Power Foods for the Brain (Hachette) is Barnard's latest book, and his thinking on food and health is worth paying attention to. Not just because he's a best-selling author, does nutrition research, teaches medicine at George Washington University School of Medicine and runs the nonprofit Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, all of which take mental acuity.
NEWS
August 31, 1994 | By Walter F. Roche Jr., INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Doris Jackson said she couldn't rest until the truth came out. Yesterday it did. Five hours after her son's body was exhumed from the grave, doctors at the University of North Carolina Medical Center declared that Thomas Jeffrey Seabron's brain had been buried with his body all along. The exhumation and the autopsy mark the apparent end of a mystery that has plagued Jackson since her son's death in a motorcycle accident more than three years ago. Shortly after her son died, Jackson was told by the funeral director that her son's brain was missing from his body when he picked it up at the Philadelphia Medical Examiner's Office in 1991.
LIVING
October 8, 1995 | By Carlin Romano, INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC
EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE By Daniel Goleman Bantam. 352 pp. $23.95 A 9-year-old goes on a rampage, soaking his school's computers and printers in paint because his third-grade classmates called him a "baby. " A shoving match outside a Manhattan rap club leaves eight people wounded when one of the affronted pulls out a .38-caliber handgun. A burglar, warned by one of two tied-up victims that she will identify him afterward to police, grabs a soda bottle, beats her and her roommate, then stabs them to death with a kitchen knife.
NEWS
August 1, 2002 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Scientists have known for years that the brain makes substances almost identical to the active ingredient in marijuana, but the function of these "cannabinoids" remained mysterious. Now, a group of researchers says the substances help to extinguish traumatic memories. These findings may help scientists develop drugs to treat anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder and phobias. "In certain situations, being able to forget is very important for emotional survival," said George Kunos, a neurobiologist at the National Institutes of Health.
NEWS
July 4, 2010 | By Lisa Scottoline, Inquirer Columnist
There was an article in the newspaper the other day that scared me to death. No, it wasn't about carbohydrates. It was about our brains, and the gist was that by going online and cruising lots of websites, we're actually changing the wiring in our brains, and this will result in an inability to concentrate and . . . Huh? Where was I? What? Uh-oh. This is bad news. Let me stay on point, which could be tough because I admit that five minutes ago, I was supposed to be working, but I took a break to go online.
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