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Brain

NEWS
March 2, 2012 | By Susan Reimer, Baltimore Sun (MCT)
Dementia and its evil twin, Alzheimer's, may have moved ahead of cancer on the list of most feared diseases, especially among baby boomers, who have begun to believe it is their inescapable fate if they have the bad luck to live too long. So we grasp at any news about aging, hoping that medical science has indeed found a way to preserve that most essential part of who we are - our memories. Do we protect our minds by doing the New York Times crossword puzzle or by doing aerobics?
NEWS
November 2, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
One woman has devoted her career to understanding the brain of an animal that measures just 1 millimeter in length. Another explores the brains of creatures with billions of neurons, whose ability with languages sets them apart from all other living things. The two will have the chance for a pretty interesting conversation in April. Cornelia Bargmann, who studies the brain of a type of roundworm, and Elissa Newport, a prominent expert on how humans learn language, are among nine new winners of awards from the Franklin Institute, given each year to recognize achievement in the sciences and engineering.
NEWS
March 28, 2011 | By Art Carey, Inquirer Columnist
David Brooks, the witty New York Times columnist, is a local boy (he grew up in Wayne and went to Radnor High) who has written a sensational new book, The Social Animal: The Hidden Sources of Love, Character, and Achievement. The book is appealing in many ways, not the least of which is Brooks' ability to synthesize vast amounts of research and present it in a fashion that calls to mind the hilarious social satire of Tom Wolfe. The gist of the book in two words: Emotion rules.
NEWS
August 12, 1992 | by Steve Lowery, Los Angeles Daily News
Just think of the possibilities if Michael Raleigh and his colleagues are right. Presidential candidates simply could be asked to roll up their sleeves, give a little blood and, when the serotonin results were counted . . . It's a brave new world to be imagined, one where serotonin, a chemical of the brain, rules because it tells us who is best to rule. The UCLA psychiatry professor believes that serotonin, known by scientists to be involved in the clotting of blood, also may determine a person's potential for leadership.
NEWS
November 18, 2011 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than five decades after the brain of Albert Einstein was preserved, partitioned, and distributed to the private collections of various hospitals and researchers, a set of the precious samples is now on public display. On Thursday, Lucy Rorke-Adams, a prominent neuropathologist at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, donated 46 slides containing Einstein's gray matter to the Mütter Museum of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia. "They are a very important part of medical history," said Rorke-Adams, 82, who received the slides from a colleague in the mid-1970s.
NEWS
July 20, 2015 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Nothing about Lucy RorkeAdams is retiring. Not her crowded office in Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, lined with medical texts and stacks of professional journals, two microscopes at the ready. Certainly not her manner - forthright and candid, ready to provide detailed answers to every question posed. And yet, this month, Rorke-Adams, 86, senior pediatric neuropathologist at CHOP and clinical professor of pathology and laboratory medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, will retire after a career spanning more than a half-century at Children's and the old Philadelphia General Hospital, where she served her internship and residency.
NEWS
August 28, 1992 | By Walter F. Roche Jr., INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
This much is certain: Emanuel Johnson was shot dead in early January of last year outside a West Philadelphia bar. It's what happened to his brain - and 24 others - that is now in dispute. In a lawsuit filed in Philadelphia, Johnson's mother, Emeline Buell, has charged that her 23-year-old son's body was taken to the city Medical Examiner's Office. There, the suit charges, his brain was cut from his skull, treated in a chemical preservative and shipped to the University of Pennsylvania for use by medical students in an anatomy course.
NEWS
May 6, 1994 | By Walter F. Roche Jr., INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If he were still alive, Thomas Seabron would have celebrated his 29th birthday this spring. But there was no party. Instead a small army of lawyers will soon head for a small town in North Carolina to watch the exhumation of his body from a family plot in the Silver Hill Cemetery. "It's time for the truth to come out," said his mother, Doris Jackson, in an interview this week. The exhumation of Thomas Seabron's body is but the latest chapter in a battle between several Philadelphia families and the city's Medical Examiner's Office.
NEWS
August 31, 1994 | By Walter F. Roche Jr., INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Doris Jackson said she couldn't rest until the truth came out. Yesterday it did. Five hours after her son's body was exhumed from the grave, doctors at the University of North Carolina Medical Center declared that Thomas Jeffrey Seabron's brain had been buried with his body all along. The exhumation and the autopsy mark the apparent end of a mystery that has plagued Jackson since her son's death in a motorcycle accident more than three years ago. Shortly after her son died, Jackson was told by the funeral director that her son's brain was missing from his body when he picked it up at the Philadelphia Medical Examiner's Office in 1991.
LIVING
October 8, 1995 | By Carlin Romano, INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC
EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE By Daniel Goleman Bantam. 352 pp. $23.95 A 9-year-old goes on a rampage, soaking his school's computers and printers in paint because his third-grade classmates called him a "baby. " A shoving match outside a Manhattan rap club leaves eight people wounded when one of the affronted pulls out a .38-caliber handgun. A burglar, warned by one of two tied-up victims that she will identify him afterward to police, grabs a soda bottle, beats her and her roommate, then stabs them to death with a kitchen knife.
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