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Brain

NEWS
August 31, 1994 | By Walter F. Roche Jr., INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Doris Jackson said she couldn't rest until the truth came out. Yesterday it did. Five hours after her son's body was exhumed from the grave, doctors at the University of North Carolina Medical Center declared that Thomas Jeffrey Seabron's brain had been buried with his body all along. The exhumation and the autopsy mark the apparent end of a mystery that has plagued Jackson since her son's death in a motorcycle accident more than three years ago. Shortly after her son died, Jackson was told by the funeral director that her son's brain was missing from his body when he picked it up at the Philadelphia Medical Examiner's Office in 1991.
LIVING
October 8, 1995 | By Carlin Romano, INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC
EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE By Daniel Goleman Bantam. 352 pp. $23.95 A 9-year-old goes on a rampage, soaking his school's computers and printers in paint because his third-grade classmates called him a "baby. " A shoving match outside a Manhattan rap club leaves eight people wounded when one of the affronted pulls out a .38-caliber handgun. A burglar, warned by one of two tied-up victims that she will identify him afterward to police, grabs a soda bottle, beats her and her roommate, then stabs them to death with a kitchen knife.
NEWS
August 1, 2002 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Scientists have known for years that the brain makes substances almost identical to the active ingredient in marijuana, but the function of these "cannabinoids" remained mysterious. Now, a group of researchers says the substances help to extinguish traumatic memories. These findings may help scientists develop drugs to treat anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder and phobias. "In certain situations, being able to forget is very important for emotional survival," said George Kunos, a neurobiologist at the National Institutes of Health.
NEWS
July 4, 2010 | By Lisa Scottoline, Inquirer Columnist
There was an article in the newspaper the other day that scared me to death. No, it wasn't about carbohydrates. It was about our brains, and the gist was that by going online and cruising lots of websites, we're actually changing the wiring in our brains, and this will result in an inability to concentrate and . . . Huh? Where was I? What? Uh-oh. This is bad news. Let me stay on point, which could be tough because I admit that five minutes ago, I was supposed to be working, but I took a break to go online.
NEWS
April 23, 1986 | BY DAVE BARRY
Have you ever really embarrassed yourself? Don't answer that, stupid. It's a rhetorical question. Of course you've embarrassed yourself. Everybody has. I'll bet the pope has. If you were to say to the pope: "Your Holy Worshipfulness, I bet you've pulled some blockheaded boners in your day, huh?", he'd smile that warm, knowing, fatherly smile he has, and then he'd wave. He can't hear a word you're saying, up on that balcony. But my point is that if you've ever done anything humiliating, you've probably noticed that your brain never lets you forget it. This is the same brain that never remembers things you should remember.
NEWS
July 13, 2011 | By Jeremy Roebuck, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An excised portion of a killer's brain could reveal whether he had a terminal disease when he attacked a family in its Douglass Township home this month. The Delaware County Medical Examiner's Office said Wednesday that it had removed Mark Geisenheyner's pituitary gland during an autopsy and sent it for testing. The move came days after reports emerged that the Pottstown man had told several people that inoperable tumors had been diagnosed shortly before his rampage. Geisenheyner, 51, died July 4 in a standoff with police in Trainer, two days after he opened fire on a family in its Montgomery County vacation home.
NEWS
October 26, 1993 | By Walter F. Roche Jr., INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They wouldn't let her see her son's body at the morgue, so Doris Jackson went to the funeral home. That's when she found out that someone had taken the brain from the body of her 26-year-old son. Now, more than two years later, she and her lawyer are still trying to find out where the brain is and why it was removed. "I still have nightmares," Jackson said in a recent interview. She also has a lot of questions. The case of Thomas Seabron is now unfolding in a lawsuit in Philadelphia Common Pleas Court.
LIVING
September 9, 1996 | By John J. Fried, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You are cruising along when, suddenly, another driver pulls alongside. His face is red. He is shouting curses you can't hear because your windows are closed. He alternately pumps his fist at you and makes obscene gestures. He swerves as if to hit you, then speeds away, his tires squealing. A teenage boy gets word that his SAT scores put him in the upper 1 percent of those who took the exam. A young woman commits suicide. Seemingly unrelated events. And yet, the driver's exaggerated reaction to your failure to signal a lane change, the teenager's intellectual success, the young woman's death have one thing in common: They are the handiwork of neurotransmitters, messenger substances that course through every millimeter of the brain.
NEWS
June 16, 1994 | By Walter F. Roche Jr., INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Margaret Zucoski left her home in the 3100 block of Wellington Street one afternoon in December 1990, she had no idea that such an ordinary day would bring tragedy - and years later a startling revelation. Sometime after she walked off, her 82-year-old husband, Joseph, went up on the roof of their home, apparently to fix a television antenna that had come loose. He lost his balance or slipped, and fell to the ground. A neighbor saw him and called an ambulance. Doctors tried to revive her husband, Zucoski remembers, but the fall proved fatal.
NEWS
February 18, 2007 | By Bonnie L. Cook INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Linda Suter knew something was wrong. Her boss, Moira Shaughnessy, 36, a take-charge Main Line executive, hadn't shown up for work in Ardmore the morning of Jan. 2. Worse, the gregarious Shaughnessy wasn't making sense over the phone. "I kept asking her, 'Where are you? Are you OK?' " Suter said, "and she would answer me with 'Are you OK?' " in an odd, girlish voice. Alarmed, Suter summoned family members, who rushed Shaughnessy to a hospital where alert physicians diagnosed viral encephalitis, a rare, often fatal disease that causes acute brain swelling.
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